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Unexpected Gender Bias


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#21 jls4

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 10:35 AM

I've read books, first person, male protag, written by a woman, and it was OBVIOUS the author was female. It's an issue with voice rather than assumptions. I could tell the author was female by HOW she wrote from male MC's POV. 

 

I see your point, although I've read some great books written by women with very male MCs. I think all people "place their opinions" on top of the MC. 


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#22 CheG

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 01:47 PM

I'm not saying women CAN'T write first person from a male POV but it has to be done right to read as a male character, and not a guy that is obviously a woman behind the pen. 

 

It's a tough call. Third person is much more manageable IMHO. I have written lots of men third person.


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#23 jls4

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 07:31 AM

I'm not saying women CAN'T write first person from a male POV but it has to be done right to read as a male character, and not a guy that is obviously a woman behind the pen. 

 

It's a tough call. Third person is much more manageable IMHO. I have written lots of men third person.

No agreed. I think I understood - I guess I was unclear in my answer. In fact on another post recently more information was discussed about this issue.

 

My point was that many times people put their opinions and actually change the way men and/or women act to fit their perspective. For instance in a lot of YA, you get lots of brooding teenage boys, but in reality there's not that many. It's just what many authors have learned young girls are into. So the concept of the male gets changed to "fit" a trope/sterotype.  


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#24 GabeJSz

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 12:33 PM

As I was reading Children of Men, I kept feeling like there was something off about Theo. I remember that at one point Theo kept having homosexual thoughts about anther guy (don't remember who, it's been a while since I read it), which, well, lets just say isn't a casual thought that enters a culturally western male's chain of thought.

Then I looked up PD James and found out that 'he' was actually a 'she'. That explained some of it, but I also think she put that in there to make the character more complex. Didn't work for me as it felt forced.



#25 Niambi

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 12:41 PM

That's an interesting problem and I've come across it with my works as well.  Particularly with naming.

 

Are you guys naming these characters with unisex names?

 

I use West African and Indian names in the worlds that I've built and the names at times are either unisex or feminine.  Many WA names are rooted in the feminine as well.  A name like Adin is unisex, but in my work it's a woman.  

 

My first novels were primarily about women so when I wrote one about a young boy my editors thought he was a she.  Another problem i run into deals with my character traits.  I usually write about characters that don't "act" their genders, in the most basic sense.  I often have confident women leading and encouraging timid men, etc.






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