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Subverting Genre Expectations?


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#1 Ellis Blake

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:43 AM

Hello,

 

I have an idea for a story, but am unsure if I should go through with it. It leans toward a literary style but contains fantastical rather than everyday life elements. The premise being that a man meets an immortal woman claiming to be fate itself and falls in love with her. Sounds like some typical fantasy romance, right? However, the man is oblivious to the woman's sociopathic nature. Not only that, the woman is actually a scientist who discovered immortality and eventually went insane from watching the universe destroy and recreate itself over and over again. It's not one of those stories where someone's psychological issues just disappear because someone falls in love with them, but an in depth look at how immortality could effect a person's psyche and the people around them.

 

Is it alright to trick the audience about what they're reading, aside from common plot twists? Or would it alienate the audience? 



#2 megsue

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:21 PM

I think this could be really great! As someone who is completely unsure into which genre her novel falls, I'd say go with your idea. If you want to trick the audience, make sure it's not out of the blue. Foreshadowing, even if super subtle, is better than suddenly dropping something on your reader that she would never have expected. It brings the reader out of the story and makes them resentful. I've had it happen on more than one occasion. That said, if you do it deftly, I could see this story being really intriguing and unique. Go for it!



#3 Charlee Vale

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:54 PM

I would say don't really worry about the audience while you're writing. Write for YOU. If you do that, you'll be much more happy with your work, trust me. 

 

So that being said, if you love this idea then write it!

 

CV


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#4 LucidDreamer

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

Sounds like this could fall into the "magical realism" genre.



#5 Tom Preece

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:31 PM

I think folks who read Dunsany and Tolkien know fantasy may always be character driven.  Go for it.



#6 Ellis Blake

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:26 PM

Thank you so much for the replies, every one. They really helped me quite a lot.






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