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Fantasy "Elements"


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#1 TyUnglebower

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 12:41 PM

My novel takes place mostly in a community theatre in a medium sized town. It's the real world, and it's present day. The production is in shambles and the actor is disillusioned. He doesn't want to do this anymore.

 

But his friends begin to encounter mysterious, helpful strangers. He himself runs into a Greek God, with whom he has a few conversations over the course of the story. The God only appears occasionally  and the mysterious strangers originate in another world, of sorts. But both the strangers and the God have only a few scenes dedicated to them. Most of the scenes and actions in the play center around fully human people doing human things of their own power. The God performs a bit of "magic" once or twice, to nudge some things along, but otherwise is more of an adviser.

 

It's not literary, because there is a specific plot, though it is a bit of a character piece at times.

 

I've been told there isn't enough of a fantasy component for it to be fantasy. Urban fantasy doesn't work, because the action is in a town, not a big urban environment. I hesitate to call it "commercial fiction" because that makes it appear more run of the mill than it is. I'm more okay with "general fiction", though that still seems like a bad fit.

 

"General fiction with fantasy elements" is a term that's been booted around by those who have read my draft. Also "with mythical elements", because of the Greek God thing, but he isn't playing out any of the myths of Ancient Greece, per se. He is just hanging around and chatting with one of the characters here and there.

 

The theme of the book, if that helps, is, in short, "honor your bliss". There are several subplots with other characters that illuminate this as well.

 

Any thoughts?


My short story collection, Thank You for Ten: Short Fiction About a Little Theater is now available for 99 cents on Kindle, Apple devices and from Smashwords

 

The Little Dionysus Playhouse is a different place every day. Sure, its house, green room, lobby, and odd hallway may all look the same day in and day out, but the various people who call the community playhouse home bring different plans, visions, fears and follies into it as soon as they enter. So each day, to each person, it’s somewhere new. In the middle of all of that, art emerges. Eventually. The ten stories in Thank You for Ten: Short Fiction About a Little Theater explore both the drama and the comedy that takes place inside a community playhouse on and off the stage.

 


#2 Fer

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:35 PM

Just fantasy sounds about right to me after reading your post.  :smile:


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#3 Midnight Whimsy

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:52 PM

Look up "magic realism" and see if that applies to your manuscript. My understanding of the term is a novel with limited paranormal or supernatural elements in an otherwise totally mundane, realistic setting.

 

Also, urban fantasy means a modern setting, not necessarily a city.

 

Good luck!

 

M.W



#4 Leigh Teale

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:44 PM

Also, urban fantasy means a modern setting, not necessarily a city.

 

That was my understanding, as well.


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#5 TyUnglebower

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:29 AM

My thanks for your thoughts, and apologies for not getting back to this thread sooner. It was one of those get everything done around the house weekends for me.

 

I have heard of and looked into magical realism, and considered it. But from what I can gather, that genre applies to a world wherein a magical or fantasy element is taken for granted as a normal part of said world. That is to say the element is fantastic to us, but to the characters, it's normal. That could be my misinterpretation of my research, of course. But if not, in my case it may not fit, since the appearance of a God takes the character by surprise. That is, it shouldn't by happening, but there it is.

 

Urban fantasy may in fact be a better choice, if in fact it merely means modern times as opposed to a city per se. But whether urban fantasy or just plain fantasy, (which I don't think I could get away with, as those readers are quite particular), my main concern is the scope of the fantasy elements. It doesn't feel like a straight up fantasy, since the fantasy elements are not the central focus of what happens. The "normal" people are. So I struggle with that.

 

Like I said, I'd hate to waste the time of fantasy agents/fans, as I know that they can be very protective of what should and should not qualify as fantasy.


My short story collection, Thank You for Ten: Short Fiction About a Little Theater is now available for 99 cents on Kindle, Apple devices and from Smashwords

 

The Little Dionysus Playhouse is a different place every day. Sure, its house, green room, lobby, and odd hallway may all look the same day in and day out, but the various people who call the community playhouse home bring different plans, visions, fears and follies into it as soon as they enter. So each day, to each person, it’s somewhere new. In the middle of all of that, art emerges. Eventually. The ten stories in Thank You for Ten: Short Fiction About a Little Theater explore both the drama and the comedy that takes place inside a community playhouse on and off the stage.

 





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