Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

Someone who knows about Midnight Mass?


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:19 PM

I didn't know where else to post this, sorry :(

 

I have a scene in my MS and it includes the main characters going to Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. I really don't know much about it, since my culture is different. Is there anyone who can tell me the step-by-step process of Midnight Mass? Most importantly, what time to get there, when it ends, what you wear, where you go, what you do, etc? And especially, the atmosphere/feeling that is generated during that time. Also: When does it occur? Literally, at Midnight before Christmas or some other time?? Are there other religious events that happen during Christmas (I've been hearing of some 12-day thing)? 

 

Thank you so much guys!


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#2 Darke

Darke

    ~Official AQC Cookie Provider~

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,489 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:I have several short stories published with online magazines such as Bewildering Stories and Aphelion, and part of the 7DS anthology SLAYERS. I have six books in a paranormal series self-published, and as of 2015, I write articles for Gaiam TV. See my blog for more details.

Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:58 PM

It depends on what denomination. My husband is Catholic and I was raised an Anglican, and oddly there are some differences between the two. There are probably slight differences with all the denominations I would assume. What branch is your MC's church? 


~I am neither an author nor a writer; I am a storyteller with good grammar.~

darkes_cover_4_sparkletn.jpg Book2TN.jpg darkescovenwtTN.jpg demonthumbnail.jpg 4311642f-9dfa-4c08-ac6d-a6979476c6ce.jpg

 

 3e1a6d8e-6529-475b-b08d-34d575e93531.jpg


#3 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:13 PM

They're Protestant. (There are branches within that as well, I think; AH! How about German Evangelical? But if there is a 'generic' Protestant branch, that'll work the best :) )


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#4 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 13 June 2013 - 10:37 PM

I'm now thinking, after some Google-ing, that Midnight Masses are only held by Catholic churches. Is that true?


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#5 K McClelland

K McClelland

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,386 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:I've had some poetry published in various poetry books, newspapers, and some online things-I don't remember the specifics though. No novel published, yet. Oh yeah-I have had some articles published in various newspapers as well, but-like the poetry- it's been a while...

Posted 13 June 2013 - 11:02 PM

I'm Episcopal and we have Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. So it's not just Catholic. Maybe just Anglican?


"I don't write. My characters do."

"A good Storyteller is born from imagination; A good Writer is born from passion; A good Author is born from both."

Check out my blog

My Twitter

#6 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 13 June 2013 - 11:20 PM

 

I'm Episcopal and we have Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. So it's not just Catholic. Maybe just Anglican?

 

Ooh, possibly. Is there any way you can tell me sort of the step-by-step process for a person from the time they enter the church for Mass to the time they leave? I'm fumbling over this scene D:


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#7 Charlee Vale

Charlee Vale

    I love tea.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 284 posts
  • Literary Status:industry insider, media
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:My short story 'A Gift of Roses' appears in Elephant Bookshelf Press' new anthology Winter's Regret. (Mar. 2014)

Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:48 AM

The term 'mass' is generally considered to be a Catholic term. There are many protestant churches that hold Christmas eve services, but they aren't mass, and they're not at midnight. I can't help you with the rituals of an actual midnight mass, but thought I'd clear up a little bit of the mist around the rest of it. 

 

CV


"My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears. And true plain hearts do in the faces rest. Where can we find two better hemispheres? Without sharpe North, without declining west. Whatever dies was not mix'd equally. If our two loves be one and thou and I love so alike, that none can slacken, none can die." --John Donne

#8 dennism

dennism

    The World's Foremost Expert

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 71 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self published "Runaway!" in 2011, paperback and Kindle, about a runaway slave boy, aka my petite opus. Publishing pre-experience: Profane Fire at the Altar of the Lord, aka my magnum opus. Nearly complete: a comic raunchy crime noir novella set in south Louisiana, aka my opus ridiculum.

Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:06 AM

Charlee is right.  "Mass" implies Catholic and perhaps Episcopal a/k/a Anglican.  Go to youtube and search "Christmas eve church service" and you will get tons of examples. I'd be surprised if you identified any common ritual. Some churches hold preaching services that are difficult to distinguish from their regular Sunday morning services. Others like musical programs and still others put on little tableaus that reinact the nativity. In my experience, your protagonist is going to find plenty of empty seats at midnight if indeed, the churchhouse isn't already locked up tight.



#9 Jeanne

Jeanne

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut novel, BLOOD OF A STONE (Tuscany Press), was released in March 2015 and received an Independent Publishing Book Award (Bronze) in the national category of religious fiction. My short stories and creative nonfiction have been published Hippocampus, Literary Mama, Museum of Americana, Red Savina Review, Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal, and Barrelhouse, among many others.

Posted 14 June 2013 - 12:53 PM

I'm Episcopalian, and we do indeed have a Christmas midnight mass. The mass involves the use of specific liturgy and follows a certain format that includes Communion as the core of the service. Since you seem to have some confusion about various denominations and how they relate, I'll try to give you a brief overview of the Episcopal, Anglican, and Catholic Churches' histories.

 

The Catholic Church is the mother of all Christian churches. Although many Protestant churches are vastly different in style and function, they come from the original foundation of the Catholic Church that was first institutionalized under the leadership of the Roman Empire. The Anglican Church (also known as the Church of England) was formed by Henry VIII in England in 1534 when the Catholic Church refused to grant him a divorce from his first wife so he could marry his second wife. Henry also wanted the money from the monasteries, but that's another story. The Episcopal Church is an American creation that traces its roots to the Revolutionary War. Originally established as the Church of England in the American colonies, it became officially the Episcopal Church after the conclusion of the Revolutionary War. The Archbishop of Canterbury refused to ordain an American bishop, so the Americans turned to Scotland for the ordination of the first Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church.

 

The head of the Catholic Church is the Pope. The head of the Anglican Church or Church of England is the Archbishop of Canterbury. The head of the Episcopal Church is the Presiding Bishop. All three churches share certain common beliefs and practices:

 

They all believe in one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. In general, baptism is performed on infants or young children.

They all use a liturgical service. In a liturgical service, prayers and excerpts from the Bible are read aloud by the priest and/or congregation throughout the service. The order of these readings is nearly always the same, coming in the same sequence. The Episcopal Church uses the Book of Common Prayer for its liturgy. You will find all of the prayers, psalms, orders of service, and statements of belief in there.

All three churches believe in the Trinity: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. The Father is God. The Son refers to Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost refers to a a spiritual advocate that aids in our communication with God and Jesus.

All three churches believe in apostolic succession. They believe that the leaders, bishops, and priests are ordained in a logical succession inspired directly from the original apostles in the New Testament.

All three churches hold communion as the core of their services. Communion consists of a prayerful partaking of the body and bread, which represents the body and blood of Jesus Christ as his sacrifice to forgive us for our sins.

 

Please note that I'm not a theologian. These are my interpretations of beliefs, but I think they're pretty close, based upon my teaching.

 

Now, let's walk through an Episcopalian midnight Christmas Eve Mass. In my church, we celebrate a high mass, which means we have incense and parts of the liturgy are song, not spoken. I'll take you step-by-step through a midnight mass at my church. Ready?

 

The service usually begins at 11:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve, and yes, people dress up. In the Southwest, where I live, the exterior of the church is adorned with luminarias, but other churches may just have standard creches and Christmas lights outside.

 

Music is playing softly when we enter the church. An usher may escort us to a pew, or we may find seating on our own. We are handed a program for the service before we go in. Inside the church, we kneel briefly for a silent prayer known only to us and God.

 

The organ brings up the music--a cue to rise--and the formal procession begins. The procession includes acolytes (people who help with lighting of the candles and other parts of the service), deacons, priests, and the choir. As the procession enters from the rear of the church, the congregation and choir sing a hymn from the hymnal that is stored in a slot on the backside of the pew in front of us. A favorite hymn for Christmas Eve mass is "O Come, O Come, Emanuel"--all 11? verses! In high mass, the procession is led by the censor who fans incense out on all sides of the aisle. The incense represents the spiritual essence of God.

 

After the hymn, the priest stands at the podium in front and says the Collect for Purity. We then sing the Gloria, a hymn of praise I believe is also used in the Catholic mass. The priest then says a special prayer for the day (in this case, a prayer relative to the Christmas service) and directs the congregation to be seated.

 

Next is a reading from the Old Testament. During Christmas Eve mass, this reading is usually from Isaiah 9:2-7, the portion that talks about the Prince of Peace.

 

After the Old Testament Reading, there is a reading from one of the Psalms. In high mass at my church, the Psalm is sung by a member of the choir. In a more traditional service, the Psalm may be read aloud by the congregation. Sometimes the Psalm is read or sung responsively: One person sings or speaks one verse, and the congregation responds by singing or speaking aloud the verse that follows.

 

Next is a reading from the New Testament, usually from Hebrews. Again, the reading is relevant to the birth of Christ. At the end of the reading, we say, "Praise be to God."

 

Everyone then stands and we sing a few verses from another Christmas carol before the reading from the Gospel. The reading of the Old Testament and the Psalms (if they're read aloud) take place at a lectern at the front of the church. For the reading of the Gospel, the priest walks down the aisle toward the center of the church during the singing of the hymn or carol. After we sing 1-3 verses, he reads from the Book of Luke in the New Testament. At the end of the Gospel reading, we say, "Praise be to Christ."

 

The sermon is next, presented by the priest at the front of the church. For Christmas Eve mass, it tends be short and a reflection about the birth of Christ. We sit during the sermon.

 

Once the sermon is concluded, we stand and recite the Nicene Creed, which is a statement of our beliefs. I think the Catholic church uses the same statement. Then we kneel again while prayers are offered by a lay reader and/or members of the congregation for the world, the departed, and for those who are close to us. When these are concluded, the priest may direct to congregation to stand or kneel while read aloud the general Confession. After the confession, we exchange the Peace. The priest says, "Peace be with you." We respond by offering him peace and turning to our neighbors to greet them and exchange offerings of peace.

 

We sit and the choir sings or another group performs while the collection is taken. A collection plate is passed among the pews and members can choose to place a donation in the plate. We stand again when the offering is brought to the altar. Sometimes a hymn is sung during the presentation of the offering.

 

Still standing, we begin the service of Communion, which starts with a prayer called The Great Thanksgiving. Then we sing the Sanctus (also used in the Catholic Church). We then stand or kneel while the priest recites the story of Jesus of how God sent Jesus for our redemption. This recalls the New Testament story of Jesus sharing the bread and wine, saying, "Take, eat, this is my body, which is given for you." and "Take, drink, this is my blood, which is shed for you and your sins." Afterward, we sing or say the Lord's prayer together. We remain kneeling or standing while the priest calls up to the altar to partake of the bread and wine (Communion). Members of the congregation are led to the altar to kneel and take a Communion wafer and drink the wine (real wine) from a single shared cup. The choir or another musical group performs while this is taking place. Once we receive Communion, we return to our seats.

 

When everyone has received Communion, we read aloud the Prayer of Thanksgiving. During Christmas Eve mass, the lights in the church are lowered then and the congregation sings "Silent Night." Some people kneel. I've also been in churches where candles are passed and lit during the singing of "Silent Night." It's now close to midnight.

 

There is a moment of silence after the singing. The lights are brought up and the priest dismisses us. We sing a final carol, often "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" or "Joy to the World," and the recession of priests, acolytes, choir, etc. leave the church with the congregation following them. That's the end of the service.

 

Although my church doesn't do this, I used to belong to an Episcopal Church that hosted a feast after midnight Mass, which was a lot of fun. The children brought sleeping bags to the parish hall and held their own short service during the mass and then went to sleep. We then woke everyone up at the end of the adult mass and stuffed our faces before going home to bed.

 

Hope that answers your questions. Sorry it was so long!

 

Jeanne



#10 LucidDreamer

LucidDreamer

    Pragmatic Dreamer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,124 posts
  • Literary Status:published, agented
  • LocationUS Southeast
  • Publishing Experience:Author of a five book cozy mystery series -- the Blue Ridge Library Mystery series -- with Crooked Lane Books. Books one, two, and three out now, book four out Jan. 2020. New mystery series -- the Booklovers B&B series -- contracted with Crooked Lane for future publication.

Posted 14 June 2013 - 12:55 PM

Many Protestant churches hold Midnight Services on Christmas Eve. Lutheran, Presbyterian, Episcopal are the most likely to do so, and usually it is larger or more metropolitan churches that go in for the Midnight services. (Smaller, more rural churches are more likely to have Christmas Eve services at 5PM or 8PM or something like that).

 

It would be rare to have communion (Protestant version of mass) at a Christmas Eve service, though.  Usually it is some special musical presentation, special sermon, readings, etc..  Maybe there would be communion with a High Episcopal service.  Never saw that in the Lutheran church. I sang in a lot of Christmas Eve services in Lutheran and Presbyterian churches -- some were at midnight, but none involved communion.



#11 Jeanne

Jeanne

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut novel, BLOOD OF A STONE (Tuscany Press), was released in March 2015 and received an Independent Publishing Book Award (Bronze) in the national category of religious fiction. My short stories and creative nonfiction have been published Hippocampus, Literary Mama, Museum of Americana, Red Savina Review, Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal, and Barrelhouse, among many others.

Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:20 PM

The Episcopal Church celebrates Communion at every full-length service, including funeral services and weddings. I think that is one way they are more like the Catholic Church than other mainstream Protestant churches.

 

Jeanne



#12 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 14 June 2013 - 06:12 PM

Oh wow, dennism, Lucid, and especially Jeanne! Thank you for your long post -- I'm going to come back to this and get the details from it.

 

You guys are awesome. Thank you so much!


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#13 AQCrew

AQCrew

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 2,740 posts
  • Literary Status:industry insider
  • LocationPacific Islands

Posted 09 July 2013 - 01:14 AM

Can't even believe we are contributing to this... but since we were raised by nuns... we have to let Sister Paula interject:

 

[attachment=6394:Sister_Paula_JPG.jpg]

 

 Mass is a Catholic term.  A "mass" implies that the sacrament of Communion has occurred.  And that means that Jesus/God/Holy Spirit literally comes down into the Church and changes the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.  Catholics believe that it literally changes into those things.  Not a metaphor.  Not a representation.  But the actual blood and body of Christ.

 

Technically, you don't have a "mass" without that... and yes, Episcopal Church is the closest Christian religion to Catholicism, and they have Communion, but they do not perform the Sacrament of Communion and they do not believe that the bread and wine are actually the body and the blood, etc.

 

Jeanne -- you can correct that about the Episcopal side... but that is what we learned.  And Catholics technically are supposed to believe that it is actually the body and blood that they are eating and drinking, although if you ask many Catholics, they won't even realize that's what they're supposed to believe.

 

20 years of Catholic church and school.  The nuns didn't mess around with Catholic-lite.

 

But if you call a service a "mass" and there's no Sacrament of Communion, traditional Catholics who know the letter of their faith will gig you for it.



#14 Tom Preece

Tom Preece

    Word Warrior

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Northwest
  • Publishing Experience:Virtually none. Long long ago in college I was published in a couple of student magazines

Posted 09 July 2013 - 01:41 AM

Love it Crew!  Not likely to cross any stuff for me, but thanks for putting it out.  You're not just the boss guy, but you're also part of the community!



#15 Jeanne

Jeanne

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut novel, BLOOD OF A STONE (Tuscany Press), was released in March 2015 and received an Independent Publishing Book Award (Bronze) in the national category of religious fiction. My short stories and creative nonfiction have been published Hippocampus, Literary Mama, Museum of Americana, Red Savina Review, Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal, and Barrelhouse, among many others.

Posted 09 July 2013 - 08:55 AM

Tom, you're right that Episcopalians don't believe in Transubstantiation, but the Episcopal Church does believe that Communion is a Holy Sacrament and the service is referred to as a Mass. There are seven sacraments in the Episcopal Church, defined in the Book of Common Prayer as: "outward and visible signs of inward and spiritual grace." The seven sacraments are:

 

  • Baptism
  • Eucharist (Holy Communion)
  • Reconciliation of a Penitent
  • Matrimony
  • Orders (ordination of deacons, priests, or bishops)
  • Unction (anointing the sick or dying)

I think some of the confusion arises with the fact the Episcopal Church uses much of the same terminology of the Catholic Church but still has slightly different beliefs.

 

Now, I have a question for you, Tom. It used to be true that non-Catholics couldn't receive Communion. Is that still true? The last time I was in a Catholic Church that rule seemed to be no longer enforced. Just wondering...I don't want to cross Sister Paula! :)

 

Jeanne



#16 SC_Author

SC_Author

    Veteran Hufflepuff Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,087 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Some poetry

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:21 AM

Thank you so much Crew! Sister Paula seems like a very smart gal :D


SC_Author on Twitter

and SCWrite.blogspot.com for my blog :)

I am blogging about all things writing and JK Rowling. I also divulge secrets about the craft.

Because writers are insane. Being a writer is misery. And, as we all know, misery loves company :)

#17 AQCrew

AQCrew

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 2,740 posts
  • Literary Status:industry insider
  • LocationPacific Islands

Posted 09 July 2013 - 11:14 AM



 

Now, I have a question for you, Tom. It used to be true that non-Catholics couldn't receive Communion. Is that still true? The last time I was in a Catholic Church that rule seemed to be no longer enforced. Just wondering...I don't want to cross Sister Paula! :)

 

Jeanne

 

[attachment=6400:Sister_Paula_JPG.jpg]

 


 

 

Not only are non-Catholics NOT allowed to receive Communion during a Catholic Mass, if you DO try to sneak through the Communion line as a non-Catholic, you will be immediately struck down by a bolt of lightning when you leave the church and drop dead on site with wafting flames and embers emitting from your burnt body.  A warning to ALL the other "disguised" non-Catholics in the vicinity.

 

 



#18 Jeanne

Jeanne

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut novel, BLOOD OF A STONE (Tuscany Press), was released in March 2015 and received an Independent Publishing Book Award (Bronze) in the national category of religious fiction. My short stories and creative nonfiction have been published Hippocampus, Literary Mama, Museum of Americana, Red Savina Review, Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal, and Barrelhouse, among many others.

Posted 09 July 2013 - 11:38 AM

Gah! Thanks for the warning. (running from the lightning-induced flames!)

 

And Sister Paula is one terrifying nun. I DON"T want her to rap my fingers with a ruler. I'd never type again!

 

Jeanne



#19 mwsinclair

mwsinclair

    Elephant with a trunk full of novels

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,862 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented, media
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Journalist covering U.S. nonprofits, foundations, and life in general. President and Chief Elephant Officer of Elephant's Bookshelf Press, LLC. Since establishing the company in 2012, we have published more than a dozen books, including several short story anthologies and debut novels by several AQC authors including "ScubaSteve" Carman and R.S. Mellette. Midway through 2018, we've already published our first nonfiction title, "Which the Days Never Know," and are putting together an omnibus collection of the Seasons Series of anthologies, with launch expected by the Christmas season. And in 2019, there will be much more, with news to come soon!

Posted 09 July 2013 - 01:37 PM

I had to chuckle. As another (and still practicing) Catholic who not only had a couple nuns as teachers (and too many priests), I also have several nuns as relatives. I don't have much to add to what's already been noted here, but as far as whether one can receive holy communion if not a Catholic, I know that it's taught that non-Catholics cannot (at least not at a Catholic mass), but I also had a friend who felt compelled to do so. He later "confessed" (not literally in confession) to a priest he'd done so and was told by the priest that if he felt compelled in that manner, then he as priest was not going to second guess what struck him as divine intervention. The friend later converted to Catholicism (not because of this one instance, but more likely as a result of his Catholic wife and the several kids they raised as Catholics).

 

As for lightning bolts, a key component of sin is that the sinner knows the action is sinful. If one is ignorant, then in the eyes of God, no sin has been committed. At least that's how I was taught.



#20 Darke

Darke

    ~Official AQC Cookie Provider~

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,489 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:I have several short stories published with online magazines such as Bewildering Stories and Aphelion, and part of the 7DS anthology SLAYERS. I have six books in a paranormal series self-published, and as of 2015, I write articles for Gaiam TV. See my blog for more details.

Posted 09 July 2013 - 02:06 PM

Now, I have a question for you, Tom. It used to be true that non-Catholics couldn't receive Communion. Is that still true? The last time I was in a Catholic Church that rule seemed to be no longer enforced. Just wondering...I don't want to cross Sister Paula! :)

 

 

No, non-Catholics are NOT allowed to take Mass. Some churches (like Husbands) might invite non-Catholics to come up and be blessed by the priest during Communion, but they aren't allowed to participate apart from that. 

 

 

Darke (a pagan who does not burst into flames when she steps into a church) :wink:   


~I am neither an author nor a writer; I am a storyteller with good grammar.~

darkes_cover_4_sparkletn.jpg Book2TN.jpg darkescovenwtTN.jpg demonthumbnail.jpg 4311642f-9dfa-4c08-ac6d-a6979476c6ce.jpg

 

 3e1a6d8e-6529-475b-b08d-34d575e93531.jpg





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users