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#41 Madseasongirl

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:58 AM

As long as it isn't out of the box to use grandma and grandpa, I think that's what I'll stick with.  We use nana and pop-pop, but it isn't the norm around here. So if there really isn't a "norm", grandpa and grandma it shall be!

 

Thanks!


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#42 patskywriter

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 11:32 PM

Sometimes families have to come up with alternatives to "Grandma" and "Granddad" (or "Grandpa") if the great-grandparents are alive. That's how I've seen "Pop-pop," "Meemaw," "Nana," and "Big Momma" (or "Big Mama") come into play.

 

This is old-school Southern: To make the distinction between sets of grandparents, the last name will be used. We used to say "Grandma Harris" when referring to my maternal grandmother. We didn't bother to say "Granddad Harris" because my dad's father was deceased. (I'm not sure if whites do this; this might be a black 'thang.')


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#43 Lanette Kauten

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 05:50 PM

Sometimes families have to come up with alternatives to "Grandma" and "Granddad" (or "Grandpa") if the great-grandparents are alive. That's how I've seen "Pop-pop," "Meemaw," "Nana," and "Big Momma" (or "Big Mama") come into play.

 

This is old-school Southern: To make the distinction between sets of grandparents, the last name will be used. We used to say "Grandma Harris" when referring to my maternal grandmother. We didn't bother to say "Granddad Harris" because my dad's father was deceased. (I'm not sure if whites do this; this might be a black 'thang.')

 

Not a black thing. We white people did that too. My kids didn't. My daughter distinguished her grandmothers by the color of their hair, and my son followed suit years later when he came along. So instead of Grandma Harris and Grandma Kanton, it's Red Grandma and Yellow Grandma.



#44 Madseasongirl

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 06:51 AM

LOL that's cute Lanette.

 

She only has one set of grandparents in her life, and no great-gps, so that's not going to be an issue....although I do like the red and yellow grandmas. :laugh:


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#45 A M Pierre

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 11:41 AM

I didn't see anyone specifying how to use the "bless his heart" add-on (apologies if I missed it), but I always heard people use it as a "get out of jail free pass."

 

That is, you say something mean about someone, then add on "bless his/her heart" to the end of it to make it all right.

 

Ex:  "That man didn't just get hit with the ugly stick, he was beaten black and blue - bless his heart."



#46 Tom Bradley

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 12:19 PM

I lived in Texas for three years and found--as Lanette observed--accents and colloquialisms varied from region to region, i.e., folks i knew from Lubbock had a distinctly different way of talking (a high-plains drawl) compared to those from Houston (more of a Southern bayou twang) or San Antonio, where I lived. So, yes, I heard the "y'all" and "all y'all" quite often, as well as the word Coke used to describe a soft drink, no matter the brand, i.e.:

 

"Y'all want a Coke?"

"Yeah."

"What kind?"

"Dr Pepper."

 

Have you Googled applicable slang terms and/or colloquialisms? My stories are set in Hawaii so I rely on Hawaiian pidgin dictionaries for words to pepper some characters' dialog. Also, in my current WIP, one of my characters is from rural Louisiana; while he's not in full-on Cajun mode, his father--with whom he speaks often on the phone--does drop an occasional localized slang term in his speech.



#47 Madseasongirl

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 04:37 PM

Thanks AM! I think "bless his/her heart" was mentioned but it never hurts to mention it again!

 

And yes Tom, I've Googled til I was purple in the face, but you guys have been so much more helpful, so thanks, thanks, and thanks some more :)

 

It's kind of hard to pin down certain things, since she has moved around so much, so I've just been sticking with the constants.


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#48 tabs

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:18 PM

This is just my experience, but the Southern whites I encountered while living in Chicago were made to feel self-conscious about their accents—probably due to the movies and television's depiction of them as dumb/unsophisticated.

 

this is a huge thing that most people that leave their country/southern towns for the big cities or other states do that most people dont realize.  i'm from WV and most people are surprised to find that out because i dont sound like their stereotypical expectations.  of course, as soon as i say where im from anyone not from 'the south' immediately runs off at the mouth with some tired, cliched joke about inbred hillbillies, rednecks, etc.  i'd imagine lots of southerners experience both of these things, and it could be a nice little touch to your character.

 

i'd say your best bet is to keep it simple and stick to ain't, ya'll, etc.  you could get away with more, but if youre tying her to a particular place anyone from that place will immediately be able to point it out as not right due to the extreme differences among all the subsets.  of course that could also mean that the rest of the people NOT from there would chalk it up to just being the local slang.  but IMHO unless youre setting it IN the south, keep it light



#49 A M Pierre

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 08:58 AM

I don't really sound Southern unless I get really excited/angry.  It's like the louder I get, the more the "ain't's" and such come out, and the accent creeps in.

 

On the Sci-Fi show Farscape, the main character had a slight Southern accent, but it always got stronger when his character was loud/yelling/angry/emotional.   I remember thinking, "I bet he really is from the South, 'cuz most people faking that accent would have it be the same (read: over-the-top) all the time." 

 

I met him once - Yep, he was  :smile:

 

(Odd/Bizarre fact: I had a very strong Southern accent until I was 7, when I watched a video of a family reunion.  I heard how strong my drawl was on the tape, and even at that age I knew how people often stereotype that type of accent as dumb or uneducated.  So I made a conscious decision and changed it.  For various reasons, I'm glad that I did, but kinda sad that I felt I had to :sad: )



#50 LucidDreamer

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:15 AM

Just remembered another funny saying I heard a lot as a kid:

 

"She/he looks like something the cat drug in and refused to eat."



#51 Madseasongirl

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 07:56 PM

I only have one character from the south, but I never thought to depict her as being self-conscious about it. My BF is from WV and I used to tease him about pronouncing "creek" as "crick", so I'm sure it's true that a lot of southerners had to overcome harsh stereotypes. She's a lesbian who hasn't come out to anyone, so I sort of have her grappling with that, I don't know if it will be too much to have her dealing with that as well. Definitely something to think about.

 

A M, it is kind of sad you felt that way at 7, but yeah, people can be cruel, especially kids.

 

LOL @ Lucid I'll have to add that to my list (yes, I really made a list :D)


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#52 tabs

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:20 PM

here's another thing thats probably inherently southern:  when you said your BF was from WV my initial thought was "i wonder where from?" not because i had any hope of knowing him, but if he were from anywhere local (which is a very broad term) im sure we could have found some common ground on other people we know. 

 

"oh, so youre from jackson county?  do you know the lockharts down in ripley?  yeah?  well i went to school with one of their cousins over in blah blah blah." 

 

you simply dont have that in most other parts of the country.

 

but for your character, i think the more important part of her identity will be the sexuality, not her speech.  good luck working them both in there though



#53 Madseasongirl

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:00 AM

Thanks tabs, and thanks to everyone else too. You've all been a tremendous help. If...no, WHEN I get published, I'll definitely have to give a shout out to AQC because this community is awesome :smile:


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#54 pen&pencil

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 02:55 PM

Well if you're going to use texting in your book, little or no capitalization or proper punctuation. Unless she's a picky sort of character or simply just likes proper grammar.

 

For words/phrases, I think southern and northern teens speak similarly (except the accent).

 

Text:

abbreviations, most can be looked up

haha

rly

ugg

idk

ikr

emoticons (-.- , 9.9 ) can be looked up

 

List: (common phrases):

"That sucks."

"Legit." - not many say this anymore

"Literally." (used for exaggeration. ex "He was literally bigger than a mountain."

"Seriously?"

"dude" -  not as much any more but not limited to guys. Girls do say this to girls. Also can be used to make others think you're serious about something. (Dude, that's not good.)

Or excited. (Dude, look at that.) It's multi-purpose.

"dope" - guy thing usually. Not used often, but it's there. Usually if they're trying to act cool.

"definitely."

"He/She's such a..." - insult

"OMG or oh my god." Teens do say both. Some say lol without saying the letters. It's annoying.

"She's so pretty."

"He's cute/hot."

"No way."

"I'm so pissed."

"What the heck or f****""

"Badass." (ex. if someone does something awesome, it's badass."

"Awesome."

 

If insulting, curses are common.   Among other words..

 

There's a lot of exaggeration. Like talking about a teacher "Oh, I hate her."

 

For mannerisms:

 

Rolling eyes. (accompanied by ugg) (girls usually with occasional guys)

Crossing arms. (girls mostly)

The finger (joking with a friend or angry at someone) (also some nail polish is a nice addition)

Laziness: (some) slumping, burping, resting head on hands

Sass (some, not many, mostly girls)

 

I suggest watching mean girls. (though many of the actions and cliques/jocks are over exaggerated and stereotypical)

Before I fall- Lauren Oliver (book)

 

Also, I was just skimming through some of what people had put and umm..

 

"What in tarnation" (unless for an adult but still unlikely) is something teens definitely do not say. I can see it used maybe as a joke.

 

***************Do not use any of these in excess, especially the phrases. It makes the teen seem like a stereotype.*****************



#55 Temperance Elisabeth

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 11:47 AM

Hmmm... Texas is not my area of expertise. (I actually don't consider Texas the South. I just consider it -- Texas  :smile:)  I think the accents there are quite different than say, Virginia, the Carolinas, or Georgia.

 

As for expressions -- if this is contemporary, I can't really think of expressions that would be different than the typical teen. With TV and all the social media, it seems like everyone uses the current expressions that are common across the country. I know the kids around here do, and so do my niece and nephew in Virginia.  (And there's no difference in their use of expressions than in those used by my nieces in California).

 

My grandparents and mother used some "mountain" expressions, and I know some, but the next generation -- nope.

 

I also don't consider Texas part of the "South". I was raised and lived in Virginia all my life up until 3 years ago. To most, mind you not all, Southerners the "South" consists of Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama,  and Louisiana. Some also include Florida, Tennessee and Kentucky, but I don't.

 

The area of Virginia I grew up in runs along the Blue Ridge Mountains, near Fredericksburg, and Culpeper. I have never heard anyone in that area use terms like "warsh" or "worsh". We do not call soda "pop", it's soda, or Coke. When you get closer to the southern part of Virginia, close to Bluefield West Virginia, they do use the term "pop". 

 

Also, one thing that my Grandmother taught me, as part of being a good southern belle, were these simple rules: 

1. Girls never sweat - they glisten.

2. Girls never "pass gas".

3. Girls never go #2. NEVER. IT DOES NOT HAPPEN.

4. Girls never burp, chew with their mouths open, or spit.

 

These are the "rules", according to my Gran.

 

Oh, and it's y' all, or you'ins. And, one last thing - as for me, when my temper flares my accent rages out of control and the twang takes over!


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#56 jadah

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 03:31 PM

I also don't consider Texas part of the "South". I was raised and lived in Virginia all my life up until 3 years ago. To most, mind you not all, Southerners the "South" consists of Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama,  and Louisiana. Some also include Florida, Tennessee and Kentucky, but I don't.

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#57 Madseasongirl

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 04:58 PM

Thanks pen&pencil and Temperance! Even though my character currently lives in TX, she's moved around a lot between the southern states, so I think I'm okay....I think... :smile:

 


Also, I was just skimming through some of what people had put and umm..

 

"What in tarnation" (unless for an adult but still unlikely) is something teens definitely do not say. I can see it used maybe as a joke.

 

 I actually love that phrase. Of course it's not something a typical teen would say, but my character is close to her grandparents and is currently being raised by them, so I think old southern phrases blended with teen "speak" would be pretty awesome to use.

 

I know my thread asks for teenage lingo but the topic kind of took a turn, and in turn, transformed my character into someone totally different and hopefully, unique. That's why I love this site :biggrin:


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#58 Temperance Elisabeth

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 05:11 PM

DON'T FORGET ARKANSAS! My lovely homestate full of corn and cows.

 

Oh lord no. Arkansas is definitely not part of the South. It's the mid-west, all the way!


"A house built on certainty is the first to crumble.  Certainty is sand.  It shifts by increments which are indiscernible to the resident, unnoticed until the final collapse, the edifice tumbling into the sea." Dallas Mullican

 

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"I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity." - Edgar Allen Poe

 

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#59 jadah

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 04:00 PM

Agree to disagree! Haha.

 

In Re: of Southernisms again, my mom called me to complain about my dad the other day. He hit her in the head with the oven door and she said, "I told him where to go and how fast to get there!" Typical southern attitude. I think it's hilarious.


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#60 January11555

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 04:08 PM

I have lived in Texas most of my life - we do have a tendency to say 'fixin to' a lot. :smile:


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