Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

Offer to help: India, Indian culture


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:37 AM

Hello! I live in India. So I can help out with all things Indian - customs, tradition, places, people, including busting any myths out there ;)

 

 


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#2 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 22 September 2013 - 07:18 PM

Hello,

 

I have an obscure question... so I don't know if you can help. Do you happen to know the color of the dirt on the Saryu river in Ayodhya? I asked several people and they didn't know...


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.


#3 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 23 September 2013 - 02:51 AM

Hello,

 

I have an obscure question... so I don't know if you can help. Do you happen to know the color of the dirt on the Saryu river in Ayodhya? I asked several people and they didn't know...

 

Hi, it's the squelchy, very normal brown sort of mud, the kind your feet dig into. At some places, there are weeds and grass growing near, so you see green rather than the brown.


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#4 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:38 AM

Thanks, if you don't mind...

 

Dark brown, medium brown, or light brown? Sorry if I'm being picky. It's just that I've been asking and searching for so long and it's an important detail.

 

I saw in other areas of Ayodhya that it was yellow-brown when dry in photos? Not sure because I couldn't figure which part of the city they belonged to.


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.


#5 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 23 September 2013 - 02:17 PM

Not at all!

 

I'm not sure about when it's dry, because the river flows all year round. If you're talking about the place where devotees go, there's no 'bank' so to speak. Manmade steps kind of descend into the river, sort of like this - http://www.flickr.co...in/photostream/

 

And IN the river, I would imagine that the colour of the mud is like this -  http://commons.wikim...oots_in_mud.jpg

a bland colour rather than yellow-brown. Rivers in India are very polluted. However, I mostly only know about the famous part of the river, the one near Ayodhya, where all the devotees go, so it's possible that another part of the river which flows through the countryside is different.

 

Hope this helps!


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#6 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 23 September 2013 - 06:13 PM

Gray brown, then?

 

Hmm... I wonder what it was like before it was polluted... but I'll take what I can get.

 

Thank you very much!


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.


#7 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 24 September 2013 - 01:00 AM

Gray-brown sounds right! :) No problem.


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#8 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 02 November 2013 - 04:48 AM

I was discussing with a friend from India and she didn't know... but now we're really curious about the next question.

 

Do you know why Indian cuisine generally doesn't include seaweed? Is there anything historically or locally that would say why?

 

The person from India comes from a region where they eat a lot of seafood, but none of that includes seaweed. I also looked up in general and I couldn't find recipes before colonialization that included seaweed...

 

I find it odd since seaweed contains iodine and the friend said that India does struggle with that. It's kinda hard to Google for... any ideas?


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.


#9 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 02 November 2013 - 10:44 AM

Wow, that's a really interesting question. I don't know the answer, but Pakistan does have seaweed recipes and it was part of India before independence. Maybe it's just a regional difference in cuisine. Not sure.


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#10 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:18 PM

My friend pointed out that "Pitaa, I love you" was incorrect between royals.

 

"Pitaa" is sanskrit... she suggested changing it to Pitaaji, (like Papaji), but I'm not sure if that goes all the way back to sanskrit nor how to look it up. Would you happen to know the correct form?


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.


#11 Blitzing

Blitzing

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 155 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationAsia
  • Publishing Experience:'Melt' in anthology 'Winter's Sweet Kiss' by e-pub

Posted 31 January 2014 - 08:02 AM

My friend pointed out that "Pitaa, I love you" was incorrect between royals.

 

"Pitaa" is sanskrit... she suggested changing it to Pitaaji, (like Papaji), but I'm not sure if that goes all the way back to sanskrit nor how to look it up. Would you happen to know the correct form?

I would agree with your friend. 'Pitaa, I love you' sounds very awkward to me. 'Pitaaji' is an ancient version of 'papaji' - it's what ancient princes/princesses would refer to their father as.


~ Shaya Roy ~

www.shayaroy.com

 

Current query (contemporary romance)  

 


#12 KimYoonmi

KimYoonmi

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 51 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Have one short story published in Crossed Genres

Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:00 AM

Ah, thank you very much. I wasn't sure "ji" was the correct form. i.e. that it hadn't changed over time as pitaa had changed to "papa". (The dictionaries I had wouldn't help either.)


East Asian, so surname first, given name second.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users