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#1 CS_W

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 11:35 AM

Hi All,

 

If you're a fellow author struggling to write a Scottish accent, please leave your questions below, maybe someone will be able to help you. : )

 

 

I was told that all countries of the commonwealth say "mate", but some people say that's mostly Australian.

 

So here's my question to all the Scots out there: How would you say "Chill, mate." In Scottish? ANSWER: "Wheesht, mate" or "Relax, pal". (both "pal" and "mate" are used, but it depends on the region)

 

Time to learn some Scottish. It's a beautiful language after all!

 

UPDATE: This one has been solved. Post your queries on the thread below : )



#2 Calcifer

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 08:51 AM

I'm struggling with that, too :) It hasn't occurred to me to put a question here, great idea Clara! I've been watching Scottish films, like STONE OF DESTINY, to help with the colloquial expressions.  


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#3 CS_W

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 09:08 AM

That's actually a really good idea! 

 

I got an answer from a work colleague: They do say "Mate". : )



#4 Calcifer

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 12:28 PM

But do they say "Chill?" I'm not an expert, but that doesn't sound very Scottish to me. I always thought it was more an American expression.


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#5 Paul Krueger

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 12:57 PM

Americans are more likely to use the word "chill" as an adjective, ie "Let's lay down a chill jam."  The colloquialized verb is known in all Anglophone countries, except for maybe Belize.

 

If you guys want a good idea of how the Scottish speak to each other, the movie you want is "Trainspotting."  Also, if you really want it to be authentic, be prepared to use a lot of words this forum's rules forbid me to post...


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#6 Calcifer

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:29 PM

Thanks, Paul. I haven't seen "Trainspotting" yet. Though I think it features a rougher type than what I'm thinking for my Scottish character.


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#7 CS_W

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:59 PM

Me too, my character is a scholar : /

 

Hum, not sure about the "chill" either. Don't want to bother my co-worker with so many questions... Bludy Hell.



#8 AMK

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 08:13 PM

I'm not sure about the chill equivalent, but when I was visiting Scotland, I heard pal used in place of mate a few times. And everyone said no worries to everything. : ) Sigh. I love that place. And Paul has it right with Trainspotting. I hated that yuck movie, but it will show you some lingo. The Scots love to swear. Bawheid (ball head), roaster (a vain jerk), Imna (I'm not), and glawkit (stupid) are a few slang terms I've picked up around Scotland.



#9 Calcifer

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 08:52 PM

Nice ones :) Thanks AMK. I guess I'll have to watch Trainspotting - oh, the things we do in the name of research! LOL


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#10 Yvette

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 10:19 PM

What, not Braveheart?  :wink:

 

"Chill" is also a verb in teenspeak. It's the same as "hang out". I know that's not what this thread is about, but maybe it'll come in handy. It's used like this: "Hey buddy, I get off work at 9, wanna chill after?"


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#11 Dayspring

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 03:07 AM

"Chill" is definitely an Americanism. What part of Scotland is your setting? If it's in Edinburgh, for example, you'd usually say "pal" instead of "mate." Sometimes if you're telling someone to calm down, and perhaps being a bit dismissive, it would be "Wheesht" (or "Haud yer wheesht/haud yer tongue" for "shut up",  though I think that would be more Glasgow.



#12 CS_W

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 04:01 AM

Brilliant Dayspring, thanks! : D



#13 Fer

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 06:14 PM

Maybe this might help? http://www.omniglot....iting/scots.htm


418%2BNxETuOL._AA160_.jpg 41Qo%2BM9WDpL._AA160_.jpg


#14 Dayspring

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 05:41 AM

Interesting website, though slightly odd interpretations - for example, Doric is not another word for Scots as it claims, but a separate dialect spoken only in Aberdeenshire, and Lallans is a purely literary form that was never widely spoken at all (Burns' poems are in Lallans). A lot of the 'useful phrases' are just written in different pronunciation from received English, or aren't used in everyday parlance.

 

If you want something really informative and highly entertaining, YouTube a skit called "Parliamo Glasgow." A Scots comedy classic!!

 

Keep in mind that people from the Highlands & Islands tend to use some Gaelic phrases, for instance a'ghraidh for darling, or Ciamar a tha thu for how's it going. The best novel I've seen for incorporating this is The Stornoway Way.  "The Gaelic Mafia: they make you an offer you can't understand."  ;)



#15 Calcifer

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 08:34 AM

Fer, thanks for the website!

 

Dayspring - I read the first few pages of The Stornoway Way, it sounds great. I think I'd read it even if I wasn't interested in Scottish.   


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#16 Yvette

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 08:38 AM

 

Keep in mind that people from the Highlands & Islands tend to use some Gaelic phrases, for instance a'ghraidh for darling, or Ciamar a tha thu for how's it going. The best novel I've seen for incorporating this is The Stornoway Way.  "The Gaelic Mafia: they make you an offer you can't understand."  ;)

Ough...if you're going to use Gaelic phrases, you'd need a pronunciation guide. The book I'm reading has Celtic phrases, names, and place names, and I refer to that pronunciation guide constantly.


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#17 Dayspring

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:21 AM

I loved the Stornoway Way and led a book group discussion on it. All the people from Stornoway hated it!! Haha.

 

Not wrong on the Gaelic phrases, Yvette. I tried to teach myself a couple times and gave up - there are three or four 'L' sounds and I just can't wrap my tongue around them. I stick to my few stock phrases: I'm cold, I'm tired, Let's go, You are ugly, and most importantly when visiting the Highlands, 'milk and two sugars, thanks!'



#18 CS_W

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 03:27 PM

Maybe this might help? http://www.omniglot....iting/scots.htm

 

Nah, been there, didn't help much, but it's a valid resource. : D



#19 CS_W

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 03:32 PM

I loved the Stornoway Way and led a book group discussion on it. All the people from Stornoway hated it!! Haha.

 

Not wrong on the Gaelic phrases, Yvette. I tried to teach myself a couple times and gave up - there are three or four 'L' sounds and I just can't wrap my tongue around them. I stick to my few stock phrases: I'm cold, I'm tired, Let's go, You are ugly, and most importantly when visiting the Highlands, 'milk and two sugars, thanks!'

Oh yes, I get a few in

 

Interesting website, though slightly odd interpretations - for example, Doric is not another word for Scots as it claims, but a separate dialect spoken only in Aberdeenshire, and Lallans is a purely literary form that was never widely spoken at all (Burns' poems are in Lallans). A lot of the 'useful phrases' are just written in different pronunciation from received English, or aren't used in everyday parlance.

 

If you want something really informative and highly entertaining, YouTube a skit called "Parliamo Glasgow." A Scots comedy classic!!

 

Keep in mind that people from the Highlands & Islands tend to use some Gaelic phrases, for instance a'ghraidh for darling, or Ciamar a tha thu for how's it going. The best novel I've seen for incorporating this is The Stornoway Way.  "The Gaelic Mafia: they make you an offer you can't understand."  ;)

 

hahaha LOVED Parliamo Glasgow! Thanks for this Dayspring!



#20 Fer

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 05:43 PM

Nah, been there, didn't help much, but it's a valid resource. : D

 

In that case, "Chill Mate." is not typically Scotties. Chill is more American slang and Mate is more commonly used to portray an Australian. A Scot would most likely use "Relax Lad or Laddy." but this also depends on the region the Scot is from.


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