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#21 Dayspring

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 03:21 AM

I don't hear people say lad or laddie here - that's more of a Brigadoon thing. I was asking my husband about this last night (he's from the Highlands) and he agreed 'pal' for Edinburgh or 'mate' for Glasgow. 'Relax' would be fine. He reckoned 'Wheesht' was ok but 'Haud yer wheesht' is more for tourists! There's another classic Scots phrase, 'dinnae fash yersel' (don't worry/don't trouble yourself), but I don't think anyone says that anymore.



#22 CS_W

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 05:41 AM

Another one guys:

 

Do Scots say "Screw it"?



#23 Calcifer

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 03:38 PM

Hmm, I thought that was mostly American...?


THE KOBOLD OF TWELVE POPLARS Query: http://agentquerycon...-grade-fantasy/

 

THE CONSPIRATOR'S CLUB Query: http://agentquerycon...998-the-league/

 

 


#24 CS_W

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 05:01 PM

Hey Calcifer, it is. I need the "Scottish translation". I'm sure there must be an equivalent : )



#25 Dayspring

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 03:22 AM

Scots do use Americanisms, but I don't recall hearing that one here. More commonly something like 'Forget it,' perhaps with a disgusted 'Och' at the start. (Yes, they do still say that.) 'Bugger' would probably work. They also use some quite old-fashioned phrases, like 'Dash it' if something goes wrong, or 'Cheery' or 'Cheerio' for goodbye. 'Bloody', on the other hand, is much more an English thing. 



#26 CS_W

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:53 AM

Thanks Dayspring! :smile:



#27 Calcifer

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 03:01 PM

What about "Bugger off"?


THE KOBOLD OF TWELVE POPLARS Query: http://agentquerycon...-grade-fantasy/

 

THE CONSPIRATOR'S CLUB Query: http://agentquerycon...998-the-league/

 

 


#28 Dayspring

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 03:13 AM

Yes, that one's popular - though honestly, the f-bomb is the swear I hear most. Bugger gives more of a 'British' feel and is less offensive too.



#29 Calcifer

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:34 PM

Thanks Dayspring :)


THE KOBOLD OF TWELVE POPLARS Query: http://agentquerycon...-grade-fantasy/

 

THE CONSPIRATOR'S CLUB Query: http://agentquerycon...998-the-league/

 

 






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