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#1 Letitia

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:58 PM

Hey, fellow writers!

 

So I'm a complete nobody indie author and I just launched a virtual blog tour with Bewitching Book Tours. It's been exactly one day and so I wanted to pop by and see if any of you have done a blog tour before. I'd be really grateful for any experiences, especially Do's and Don'ts because I have a two week tour that I paid for and I really, really want to get my money's worth. Any tips about how to promote my work and reach an audience would save my life. I'm willing to go the distance. 

 

Additionally, what were the end results of the tour? Did it increase sales, followers, or generate buzz about your work? I'm not in it for the money, naturally, but I do need to make sure that I haven't been swindled.

 

Please and thank you. 

 

P.S. If you're interested in following the tour, here's the page I made for it. You can also critique that as well if you like. 


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

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Like sarcasm? Then you'll love me. Probably. I write urban fantasy. Here's my Twitter, Blog, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Facebook page.

 

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#2 Midnight Whimsy

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:53 AM

I've never done a blog tour myself, but I've heard advice around various forums and blogs. A key factor is -- don't just talk about your book! Blogs aren't about selling things; blogs are about reading something interesting, be it book reviews, genre discussion, novel tropes, whatever. To give the blog readers what they want, you have to be interesting. People can spot a sales pitch a mile away. Instead of focusing on selling, focus on talking about something related and interesting. For example, if you write angel paranormal, you could write an article about the sub-genre's evolution over the past year -- and work in just a mention or two of your book. If you're interesting, people will assume your book is interesting too, and go check it out. If you burst into their interesting, informative blog with nothing but a sales pitch (or disguised sales pitch), you probably won't make many friends. A blog tour is about connecting with new readers, not selling your book to them.

 

Good luck!

 

M.W



#3 Letitia

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:01 AM

I've never done a blog tour myself, but I've heard advice around various forums and blogs. A key factor is -- don't just talk about your book! Blogs aren't about selling things; blogs are about reading something interesting, be it book reviews, genre discussion, novel tropes, whatever. To give the blog readers what they want, you have to be interesting. People can spot a sales pitch a mile away. Instead of focusing on selling, focus on talking about something related and interesting. For example, if you write angel paranormal, you could write an article about the sub-genre's evolution over the past year -- and work in just a mention or two of your book. If you're interesting, people will assume your book is interesting too, and go check it out. If you burst into their interesting, informative blog with nothing but a sales pitch (or disguised sales pitch), you probably won't make many friends. A blog tour is about connecting with new readers, not selling your book to them.

 

Good luck!

 

M.W

 

Thanks for the advice! I have two weeks' worth of stops and so I'll make sure that on the ones where I'm interviewed or write a guest blog, I'll be as interesting as possible and try my best not to seem like I'm just out to sell copies. 


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

-Ray Bradbury

 

Like sarcasm? Then you'll love me. Probably. I write urban fantasy. Here's my Twitter, Blog, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Facebook page.

 

Think I might not be a sucky writer? Scoop up a copy of The Black Parade

 


#4 TBruce

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:35 AM

I love me a blog tour! I've done quite a few now (as an author) and I definitely could write a manifesto...oh wait, appears I'm going to write one now. Sorry this is so long - I just see authors do so many things during these tours to shoot themselves in the foot. I hope these tips are helpful.

 

#1 tip: if a blog fails to post on time DO NOT CONTACT THEM AND DEMAND TO KNOW WHY THE POST ISN'T UP.

 

No, seriously, do not do that. Bloggers are amateurs/hobbyists/unpaid etc. They do this because they WANT to, not because they HAVE to, and they don't work for you (and by you I mean - authors). Tech hiccups happen. People might forget or mix up the date. They might have a personal emergency. They might be in a different time zone (as much as a day behind you) and their post will go up later in the day. Etc. Sometimes they flake. It happens.

 

I do guest interviews for spec authors on my blog. If a post is late and the author emails me asking where their post is, they NEVER get asked back to my blog. I just had one author post a snarky comment on my blog b/c I made a typo on her name. Never being invited back (if it bugged her that much she should have politely emailed me and pointed out the mistake). I'm doing the authors a favor, giving them some free promo, allowing them to tap into my blog readers and taking time away from promoting myself and/or writing to do this for them - they damn sure better not act like I work for them. Grrrr...where are my angry eyes? :tongue:

 

On the other hand, you are paying the tour operator, they DO work for you and you have a right to express displeasure (to the tour operator, not the bloggers) if you pay for 10 appearances and only get 8 b/c two blogs never posted.

 

Do stop by each of the blogs on the day of your appearance and leave a comment. Check back frequently and respond to comments that are left - try to build some interaction. However, do NOT EVER respond negatively to a negative comment. There is no rule that says everyone on the planet has to love you or your book or your book's premise or your book's cover, etc. So don't expect all love and kisses; there might be some people who say things you don't like (that they hate your cover, that your book premise is just like another book they read, etc.). Don't respond. Remember that the blog is the BLOGGER'S forum to interact with his/her audience, not yours. You have no control over what happens there. You are just stopping by to the talk to the Blogger's audience/readers. NEVER contact a blogger and demand that they remove a comment you don't like, sanction a commenter for something you don't like, etc. Not.Your.Blog.

 

It's very likely you'll hear crickets chirping during your visit. That's not a bad thing/sign of blog tour failure. It's REALLY hard to get people to comment on blog posts. If you run your own blog, you know this for a fact. So people saw the post, saw your book cover, made note of it, and moved on. Mission accomplished. Your tour did its job. So don't let lack of comments get you down.

 

You may or may not see a spike in sales. People rarely run right out and buy a book the second they hear about it. It's unrealistic to expect your book to create such a frenzy. It's much more likely that you'll see a spike in people shelving it on goodreads. You might see a bump in twitter followers and/or FB likes. Those are good, too. Remember - long term, slow and steady is the name of the game in book marketing. Many small steps like this add up over time.

 

On average, people have to hear mention of something seven times before they act on the information. If you're doing a ten-blog stop, some of the readers might be cross readers so they might see your book mentioned 2 or 3 times in a day or a week. Also, most book bloggers post at least once per day, sometimes more offten than that, so you are the top story for a VERY short period of time, which also limits the exposure. For this reason I've found that one day promo blitzes have almost no effect. It's too short of an exposure. I never do less than 2 weeks anymore and doing two stops per day (a promo spot and a guest post or interview, etc.) during the two weeks is the best. Interviews seem to have the least effect - readers don't much care to read an interview with an author they don't know. Promos and guest posts seem to be the most effective (in my experience).

 

The only people who are going to jump around the internet and go to each stop/follow the tour are your fans, unless there is an incentive (giveaways). The blog's readers probably won't. They'll read the post on the blog they follow and that's it, so the traffic at each site will be very variable.

 

A little gratitude goes a long way (b/c, sad to say, so many authors apparently never think to do these things): Thank the bloggers for participating (send them each a nice, personalized email). Follow the bloggers on twitter and/or friend them on FB (i.e. support them as they are supporting you, plus it's networking). Promote the hell out of the tour to your followers/fans (tweet daily, FB posts, etc.).

 

And lastly, I've used Bewitching several times and have liked them very much. Roxanne is great; you haven't been swindled and will have a good tour :-)

 

Good luck - the new 21st century author blessing: may your blog tour go smoothly and may your book prosper because of it :laugh:

 

--Terri


hereafter_cover_jpg_72_twitter.jpg

 

Terri Bruce--creating my own special blend of literary science fiction and fantasy
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#5 Letitia

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:11 PM

I love me a blog tour! I've done quite a few now (as an author) and I definitely could write a manifesto...oh wait, appears I'm going to write one now. Sorry this is so long - I just see authors do so many things during these tours to shoot themselves in the foot. I hope these tips are helpful.

 

#1 tip: if a blog fails to post on time DO NOT CONTACT THEM AND DEMAND TO KNOW WHY THE POST ISN'T UP.

 

No, seriously, do not do that. Bloggers are amateurs/hobbyists/unpaid etc. They do this because they WANT to, not because they HAVE to, and they don't work for you (and by you I mean - authors). Tech hiccups happen. People might forget or mix up the date. They might have a personal emergency. They might be in a different time zone (as much as a day behind you) and their post will go up later in the day. Etc. Sometimes they flake. It happens.

 

I do guest interviews for spec authors on my blog. If a post is late and the author emails me asking where their post is, they NEVER get asked back to my blog. I just had one author post a snarky comment on my blog b/c I made a typo on her name. Never being invited back (if it bugged her that much she should have politely emailed me and pointed out the mistake). I'm doing the authors a favor, giving them some free promo, allowing them to tap into my blog readers and taking time away from promoting myself and/or writing to do this for them - they damn sure better not act like I work for them. Grrrr...where are my angry eyes? :tongue:

 

On the other hand, you are paying the tour operator, they DO work for you and you have a right to express displeasure (to the tour operator, not the bloggers) if you pay for 10 appearances and only get 8 b/c two blogs never posted.

 

Do stop by each of the blogs on the day of your appearance and leave a comment. Check back frequently and respond to comments that are left - try to build some interaction. However, do NOT EVER respond negatively to a negative comment. There is no rule that says everyone on the planet has to love you or your book or your book's premise or your book's cover, etc. So don't expect all love and kisses; there might be some people who say things you don't like (that they hate your cover, that your book premise is just like another book they read, etc.). Don't respond. Remember that the blog is the BLOGGER'S forum to interact with his/her audience, not yours. You have no control over what happens there. You are just stopping by to the talk to the Blogger's audience/readers. NEVER contact a blogger and demand that they remove a comment you don't like, sanction a commenter for something you don't like, etc. Not.Your.Blog.

 

It's very likely you'll hear crickets chirping during your visit. That's not a bad thing/sign of blog tour failure. It's REALLY hard to get people to comment on blog posts. If you run your own blog, you know this for a fact. So people saw the post, saw your book cover, made note of it, and moved on. Mission accomplished. Your tour did its job. So don't let lack of comments get you down.

 

You may or may not see a spike in sales. People rarely run right out and buy a book the second they hear about it. It's unrealistic to expect your book to create such a frenzy. It's much more likely that you'll see a spike in people shelving it on goodreads. You might see a bump in twitter followers and/or FB likes. Those are good, too. Remember - long term, slow and steady is the name of the game in book marketing. Many small steps like this add up over time.

 

On average, people have to hear mention of something seven times before they act on the information. If you're doing a ten-blog stop, some of the readers might be cross readers so they might see your book mentioned 2 or 3 times in a day or a week. Also, most book bloggers post at least once per day, sometimes more offten than that, so you are the top story for a VERY short period of time, which also limits the exposure. For this reason I've found that one day promo blitzes have almost no effect. It's too short of an exposure. I never do less than 2 weeks anymore and doing two stops per day (a promo spot and a guest post or interview, etc.) during the two weeks is the best. Interviews seem to have the least effect - readers don't much care to read an interview with an author they don't know. Promos and guest posts seem to be the most effective (in my experience).

 

The only people who are going to jump around the internet and go to each stop/follow the tour are your fans, unless there is an incentive (giveaways). The blog's readers probably won't. They'll read the post on the blog they follow and that's it, so the traffic at each site will be very variable.

 

A little gratitude goes a long way (b/c, sad to say, so many authors apparently never think to do these things): Thank the bloggers for participating (send them each a nice, personalized email). Follow the bloggers on twitter and/or friend them on FB (i.e. support them as they are supporting you, plus it's networking). Promote the hell out of the tour to your followers/fans (tweet daily, FB posts, etc.).

 

And lastly, I've used Bewitching several times and have liked them very much. Roxanne is great; you haven't been swindled and will have a good tour :-)

 

Good luck - the new 21st century author blessing: may your blog tour go smoothly and may your book prosper because of it :laugh:

 

--Terri

 

Don't apologize at all! This is exactly what I was hoping for--someone who has a lot of experience in the area. I am eternally grateful for all this information because this is my first time and I've had all kinds of questions that I don't know where to get the answers yet.

 

To that end, as a brand spanking new author, how often should I do a blog tour? Maybe once or twice a year? A few times? Thankfully, Bewitching is affordable but I need to know if it'll be worth the money to do this more than once. My second book in the series is set for a summer release next year so I have plenty of time to continue marketing this one, and believe me, I need to market it because my sales are pathetic. How many times have you done a blog tour? 

 

And, if you don't mind sharing, what were your results? How long did it take to get a decent following, or anything resembling book sales? Do you have any other suggestions for me to try? I have a book trailer that's almost finished, but I only have about 130+ subscribers on Youtube, so that probably won't do me much good. I have a limited budget as well, but I am good at saving up my money for future endeavors. Any thoughts you're willing to share would be fantastic. 

 

Thank you so much! This was a huge help. I wanted some perspective, but I didn't want to bug Roxanne about it because I know it's not her job to hold my hand and walk me through this stuff. She's a busy woman, after all. But I will definitely message each blog and thank them for hosting my book. Great idea.

 

You rock! I'll be following you on Twitter in just a few moments. 


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

-Ray Bradbury

 

Like sarcasm? Then you'll love me. Probably. I write urban fantasy. Here's my Twitter, Blog, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Facebook page.

 

Think I might not be a sucky writer? Scoop up a copy of The Black Parade

 


#6 Robin Breyer

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:45 PM

I participated in one a year ago and the results really vary depending on each blogger's audience. I recommend them as it increases exposure.


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#7 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:53 PM

I've done one and have to say I won't be repeating the experience.

It does depend on your target audience and genre, some books do phenomenally well on tour, others don't, so its important that the blog and followers fit your novel.



#8 Letitia

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:43 PM

I participated in one a year ago and the results really vary depending on each blogger's audience. I recommend them as it increases exposure.

 

Care to elaborate on your experience any? I'm all ears. 


I've done one and have to say I won't be repeating the experience.

It does depend on your target audience and genre, some books do phenomenally well on tour, others don't, so its important that the blog and followers fit your novel.

 

Aw, I'm sorry to hear that it didn't work out for you. If you don't mind me asking, what exactly was the main issue for you? 


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

-Ray Bradbury

 

Like sarcasm? Then you'll love me. Probably. I write urban fantasy. Here's my Twitter, Blog, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Facebook page.

 

Think I might not be a sucky writer? Scoop up a copy of The Black Parade

 


#9 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:06 PM

I paid for a certain number of spots over a week and 3 blogs never hosted my posts, and I had no joy with the tour operator. Also my book was placed with contemp romance oriented blogs and given my book is steampunk, I don't think it was a very good fit. That's why I think the blog & book need to mesh, otherwise you're trying to pitch your book to the wrong audience.



#10 Robin Breyer

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:07 PM

Well, I can't say how many people looked at each blog, but being a primarily SF author, I noticed that some blogs resulted in more traffic for my books. And if you are going to do a blog tour, you have to realize that some people don't have the reach to help you so you are more helping them. Or you might be the one benefiting. The way I approached it was that my posts were going out into the world and each blog should have my best effort. And I did my best to make sure that each poster on my blog had as much exposure as I could give them.


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#11 TBruce

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:33 PM

 

To that end, as a brand spanking new author, how often should I do a blog tour? Maybe once or twice a year? A few times? Thankfully, Bewitching is affordable but I need to know if it'll be worth the money to do this more than once. My second book in the series is set for a summer release next year so I have plenty of time to continue marketing this one, and believe me, I need to market it because my sales are pathetic. How many times have you done a blog tour?


Keep in mind, an author does not need to use a tour company to book a blog tour, because you are right, it can get expensive. It's also very hands off/remote and, personally, I actually like the hands on/personal touch. I like interacting with bloggers, getting to know them, etc. So, you can book your own. Hence the thanking bloggers, not behaving badly, following them on twitter/FB, etc. advice I offered - it's relationship building, which makes it easier for you to book your own appearances/tours. I've moved toward doing two tours back to back - one booked by a company because it's a foot in the door with some bloggers who are harder to get booked by (some of the big ones) and one booked by me. So, if I might do a month-long tour that is actualy 50%/first two weeks booked by a company and 50%/second two weeks booked by me. But that's just my approach.

How often you tour is up to you. It's a lot of work so I guess it's how much time you have to do it. And there are diminishing returns - once your book isn't new anymore or has appeared on a lot of blogs, then you won't get as many bloggers signing up. So I do them for milestones - launch, my birthday, halloween (relates to my books theme/topic), etc.
 

And, if you don't mind sharing, what were your results? How long did it take to get a decent following, or anything resembling book sales?


Well, that's just marketing in general - you'd need this entire forum to answer that question :smile: I can say for sure: you're not going to get a following or giant sales just from one blog tour.

Now, I wrote the following, deleted it, rewrote it, deleted it, and finally am deciding to post it. It's probably going to come off as discouraging or possibly condescending and I don't mean it to, not at all, but I don't know how to say it so it doesn't (and I call myself a writer - sheesh! :tongue:). It's what I've learned after being at this for a year so I'm sharing it in the hopes that it's helpful. Again, I hope it helps answer your questions - if it seems rude or condescending, just bop me on the head.

So...here's an experiment (I recommend all authors do this): Sign up for an RSS feed reader (like blog lovin). Find ten book blogs to follow. Follow them in the RSS reader. Wait a week and then go to your reader and scroll through your feed.

How many books do you see mentioned?

50 books? 100 books? 200? Was your book in there? Did you even see it flash by in the long list of books being mentioned/pictured? Close the browser window and walk away. How many book titles do you remember of what you just saw?

Ten blogs, five days and 200 books are mentioned/advertied, and your book is just one tiny blip in that ocean. And ten blogs is the size of the atom in the sea that is the internet. Readers are constantly barraged with images and info. on HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of books on a daily basis. So one ten-stop blog tour is hardly even going to make a dent in that. That is not to discourage you, not at all. Just the opposite, in fact. But I hear a lot of newbie authors say "My book came out and people didn't flock to buy it. I don't understand what happened" or they say, "I did a blog tour/guest post/appearance/FB post - I've done everything I can and sales are still pitiful. I don't understand what happened." Well, the internet and ginormous number of published books is what happened. The author did one blog tour and thought that was marketing. They sent a couple of tweets and thought that was marketing. They posted on their facebook fan page to their 100 followers and thought that marketing. What they actually did was flick a droplet into an ocean. The world is vast. Each of us touches a microscopic part of it. I have 800 twitter followers (woohoo!!!!); a year ago I had none so that feels pretty huge to me (especially since I don't auto follow back and I don't do mutual author liking/following groups). Guess what - there are how many BILLION people on the planet??? Sad but true: my 800 followers, which I have worked my butt off to get and to keep, is statstically insignificant. To sell books in any measurable quantity, an author has to touch an increasingly large part of the world every single day.

LOL - sorry, that wandered off of blog tours and probably sounded very discouraging. Again, it's not meant to be. It's meant to illustrate the ginormous amount of work that is book marketing. Blog tours are a very, very small part of that. It's not "how often should I blog tour" but how often CAN I blog tour AND what else can I be doing in addition to the blog tour. Some days I feel very discouraged by the sheer enormity of it, but most days I look at it as a challenge - what new venue can I find today? Can I find five new blogs to appear on? Can I friend five new people on FB or twitter. Etc. It's that slow and steady, a little bit every day that builds sales. The "one and done" marketing efforts just dissolve in the ocean. :smile:

Sorry this is so long-winded (I'm a novelist for a reason!). Hope this helps!

--Terri

hereafter_cover_jpg_72_twitter.jpg

 

Terri Bruce--creating my own special blend of literary science fiction and fantasy
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#12 TBruce

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:49 PM

 

I paid for a certain number of spots over a week and 3 blogs never hosted my posts, and I had no joy with the tour operator. Also my book was placed with contemp romance oriented blogs and given my book is steampunk, I don't think it was a very good fit. That's why I think the blog & book need to mesh, otherwise you're trying to pitch your book to the wrong audience.

 
Yeah, the not getting the number of spots you paid for is bad; I'd be mad too! I like Bewitching b/c she has always over-booked me - if I pay for 10 she usually books me for 14-20. She builds in that cushion so that if some of the bloggers flake the author still gets what they paid for.

The being introduced to other markets is actually one of the things I like about blog tours. The first tour, I was not happy at first when I saw my book booked on a bunch of romance sites b/c I thought it was a mismatch - my novel is paranormal/contempory fantasy - NO romance - so I was like "oh dear." But actually it's done really well with romance readers, which surprised the socks off of me (and literary fic readers, esp. readers of literary fantasy; surprisingly, it's been a bit of a mixed bag with urban fantasy readers who I had thought were my market). So I did like that the blog tour sort of pushed me in new directions that I wouldn't have gone myself.

--Terri

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#13 Letitia

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:20 PM

 

Keep in mind, an author does not need to use a tour company to book a blog tour, because you are right, it can get expensive. It's also very hands off/remote and, personally, I actually like the hands on/personal touch. I like interacting with bloggers, getting to know them, etc. So, you can book your own. Hence the thanking bloggers, not behaving badly, following them on twitter/FB, etc. advice I offered - it's relationship building, which makes it easier for you to book your own appearances/tours. I've moved toward doing two tours back to back - one booked by a company because it's a foot in the door with some bloggers who are harder to get booked by (some of the big ones) and one booked by me. So, if I might do a month-long tour that is actualy 50%/first two weeks booked by a company and 50%/second two weeks booked by me. But that's just my approach.

How often you tour is up to you. It's a lot of work so I guess it's how much time you have to do it. And there are diminishing returns - once your book isn't new anymore or has appeared on a lot of blogs, then you won't get as many bloggers signing up. So I do them for milestones - launch, my birthday, halloween (relates to my books theme/topic), etc.
 

Well, that's just marketing in general - you'd need this entire forum to answer that question :smile: I can say for sure: you're not going to get a following or giant sales just from one blog tour.

Now, I wrote the following, deleted it, rewrote it, deleted it, and finally am deciding to post it. It's probably going to come off as discouraging or possibly condescending and I don't mean it to, not at all, but I don't know how to say it so it doesn't (and I call myself a writer - sheesh! :tongue:). It's what I've learned after being at this for a year so I'm sharing it in the hopes that it's helpful. Again, I hope it helps answer your questions - if it seems rude or condescending, just bop me on the head.

So...here's an experiment (I recommend all authors do this): Sign up for an RSS feed reader (like blog lovin). Find ten book blogs to follow. Follow them in the RSS reader. Wait a week and then go to your reader and scroll through your feed.

How many books do you see mentioned?

50 books? 100 books? 200? Was your book in there? Did you even see it flash by in the long list of books being mentioned/pictured? Close the browser window and walk away. How many book titles do you remember of what you just saw?

Ten blogs, five days and 200 books are mentioned/advertied, and your book is just one tiny blip in that ocean. And ten blogs is the size of the atom in the sea that is the internet. Readers are constantly barraged with images and info. on HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of books on a daily basis. So one ten-stop blog tour is hardly even going to make a dent in that. That is not to discourage you, not at all. Just the opposite, in fact. But I hear a lot of newbie authors say "My book came out and people didn't flock to buy it. I don't understand what happened" or they say, "I did a blog tour/guest post/appearance/FB post - I've done everything I can and sales are still pitiful. I don't understand what happened." Well, the internet and ginormous number of published books is what happened. The author did one blog tour and thought that was marketing. They sent a couple of tweets and thought that was marketing. They posted on their facebook fan page to their 100 followers and thought that marketing. What they actually did was flick a droplet into an ocean. The world is vast. Each of us touches a microscopic part of it. I have 800 twitter followers (woohoo!!!!); a year ago I had none so that feels pretty huge to me (especially since I don't auto follow back and I don't do mutual author liking/following groups). Guess what - there are how many BILLION people on the planet??? Sad but true: my 800 followers, which I have worked my butt off to get and to keep, is statstically insignificant. To sell books in any measurable quantity, an author has to touch an increasingly large part of the world every single day.

LOL - sorry, that wandered off of blog tours and probably sounded very discouraging. Again, it's not meant to be. It's meant to illustrate the ginormous amount of work that is book marketing. Blog tours are a very, very small part of that. It's not "how often should I blog tour" but how often CAN I blog tour AND what else can I be doing in addition to the blog tour. Some days I feel very discouraged by the sheer enormity of it, but most days I look at it as a challenge - what new venue can I find today? Can I find five new blogs to appear on? Can I friend five new people on FB or twitter. Etc. It's that slow and steady, a little bit every day that builds sales. The "one and done" marketing efforts just dissolve in the ocean. :smile:

Sorry this is so long-winded (I'm a novelist for a reason!). Hope this helps!

--Terri

 

I hope to someday be able to do that, but since I'm still unknown, I don't have any clout. I've managed to find a couple book bloggers on my own, but they're obscure and haven't been able to help me spread my influence very far. I might have to start with book tour experts and work my way from there if my novel gains any traction. 

 

I didn't mean to imply that I expect huge returns from one initial blog post. Not at all. What I'm trying to determine is what results should I be looking for after this first blog tour. I know full well that the odds of me getting any sales or any followers out of a two week tour are a million to one. I'm simply trying to find out what I should expect and how to grow from there. 

 

And I do understand that marketing as an author is a lifetime gig. This isn't a money making scheme. I'd be better off selling drugs than selling books if I wanted to make money. Don't worry, I understand what you're saying and I don't think you're being condescending at all. I may be new, but I've done the research and I know it's going to be a long, miserable, cold, lonely road for a long time. I've got sweaters and chocolate to help me cope. What I meant with this post was to find out what results I should be sifting through in order to develop my next marketing strategy, or a future blog tour. Like you said, it's a drop in a bucket, but if I can find out what had the best splash, maybe I won't end up in the slush pile forever. 

 

Thanks again for taking the time to talk with me. I'd love to continue discussing what sorts of marketing methods you used to gain those 800 followers. That's definitely a dream I hope to achieve a year from now. Share whatever you wish. I'm all ears. 


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

-Ray Bradbury

 

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#14 YoungAdultSlave

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:07 AM

This is an interesting topic! I haven't published anything until now, but if I do. I'd definitely look into booking a blog tourr.

 

@T.Bruce: why is it considered bad manners to contact a blogger if the post about my book doesn't go up? Not immediately, but after 1 day or 2. I understand they are doing me a favor, but still...If I promise someone to give them a drive to the airport (as a favor), then I make surre I do show up, or at least let them know if I can't. I realize this example isn't terribly good, but my point is, even if the blogger is doing me a favor, it's an unspoken agreement between us that each one expects the other one to go throrugh with the promise.

 

I'm not talking about assaulting the bloggerr within the hour, demanding why the post isn't up, but I don't understand why checking in after a while is considered such a major offense...



#15 Robin Breyer

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:12 PM

A good blog tour is going to have a mix of known and unknown bloggers. The more popular bloggers drive the tour by bringing people to their blog to read the guest posts and to read their posts on other blogs. That's what I've seen and it gets results.


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