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Help - questions to ask e-publisher


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#1 Blitzing

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:08 AM

So this e-publisher I'd submitted a short story to accepted it for their anthology. I will, of course, go through their contract carefully, but any particular things I need to be on guard against? Any red flags to watch out for? I'm so confused, don't want to appear overly paranoid and bombard them with bazillion questions.


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#2 Mark Friedlander

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 12:47 PM

I think the first question is what can the e-publisher do for you that you can't do yourself. 5,000 to 30,000 word publications are becoming popular at Amazon.com. You can earn a 70% royalty on each ebook priced at $2.99 or above. Prices below $2.99 earn you a 35% royalty on each ebook you sell. If your shortie is accepted into the Amazon Singles program you can earn a 70% royalty even if the book is priced below $2.99.

 

If you decide to accept the anthology's offer, I'd make sure that after a certain point in time, you regain the rights to publish the story on your own and to sell it elsewhere.

 

Mark


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#3 Andrew Nelson

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 01:35 PM

I concur with Mark. I'd consider what the return (royalty) is going to be and then compare it to what you might expect through Amazon and doing some of the promotional leg work on your own. If you do go with the e-pub, find out when the rights revert back to you. 


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#4 Mark Friedlander

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:37 PM

Yeah, Andrew. If Blitzkrieg can get paid by the anthology and get second publishing rights in a reasonable amount of time, that may be the best of both worlds.

 

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#5 Blitzing

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 01:39 AM

Thanks for your replies, Mark and Andrew. The rights revert back in 3 years. Is that too long?

 

Well, the main advantages of the e-publisher to me are cover image, editing, formatting, marketing etc because I'm not experienced at this and the short story I wrote was a one-off. My 'real' publishing dream is the full-length novel I've got, for which I'll try to go the traditional publishing route. I didn't really want to take time off from that for this, which is why I chose an e-publisher. The only thing I'm worried about is any sort of weird stuff - I've read accounts of stories being drastically edited. That's what I want to protect against.


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#6 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 01:44 AM

Just to add a different POV... I have 2 short stories published in anthologies and in both cases I retained all rights.

#7 Mark Friedlander

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 08:41 AM

Thanks for your replies, Mark and Andrew. The rights revert back in 3 years. Is that too long?

 

Well, the main advantages of the e-publisher to me are cover image, editing, formatting, marketing etc because I'm not experienced at this and the short story I wrote was a one-off. My 'real' publishing dream is the full-length novel I've got, for which I'll try to go the traditional publishing route. I didn't really want to take time off from that for this, which is why I chose an e-publisher. The only thing I'm worried about is any sort of weird stuff - I've read accounts of stories being drastically edited. That's what I want to protect against.

I think you need to weigh the 3 years against how much they're willing to pay you. Also, AWExley indicates that a three year period may not be the norm.

 

Mark


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#8 J. Lea Lopez

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:24 AM

Is this a small press with name recognition? Are you getting paid for this? I think the trend is for newer indie presses to release rights sooner. If it's an established press whose anthologies tend to sell well, if they're paying you, and if this is a publishing credit that you feel could help you in the long run, I don't think three years is too bad. Read the contract to find out about editing and ask them if you're not sure. If you already did some homework before submitting to them to find out they're acactually a reputable publisher, you shouldn't have to worry about them chopping your story to bits without permission.

Self publishing is always an option, but it takes time and effort to do it well and do it right. Money is not always the sole (or most important) reason for choosing one publishing option over another.




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