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The throne room.


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#1 Yuan Francois

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:52 AM

Help me visualize it. The throne room to a king. 

Does his queen stand by him?

Is it empty?

What does he do there? Just sit?

What is its main function?


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#2 gmelin

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 12:15 PM

A lot if answers to this. If its fantasy, you can do whatever you want. Historically, it was largely a ceremonial chamber where the king would receive state visitors with lots of ceremony. The throne might be on a raised platform. It would be at the far end from the main entrance. Likely there would be a small door nearby which would be used by the king and his closest officials as well as anyone who was tired of being alive.

The throne itself was really just a big chair, probably not comfortable, and ornate, but less so than you might expect. Mostly you would see the presence of materials chosen as much for scarcity as for aesthetics. The same might be true of the royal wardrobe: I'm rich, be-yatch.

There might be a queens throne, less opulent, possibly not much fancier than some Victorian dining room chair. Or she might stand, probably behind and slightly to the side. The kings chamberlain or other closest advisor might also be similarly placed.

Members of the court would probably stand along side of the chamber, although seats aren't out of the question. But if there are seats, nobody sits until the king does, and they all rise with him. Formal things would happen, then the king would leave and then so would the others

This is all very generic. For some pretty good visual representations, see the films of Hamlet, with either Laurence Olivier or Mel Gibson.

Hope this helps.

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#3 Yuan Francois

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 12:20 PM

It does help, thank you.


"It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come."
-Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare 


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#4 Andrew Nelson

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 01:45 PM

If this is historical, or trying to depict a historically accurate setting, it would also depend on the time period. What might have been an opulent room in one time (and place) would not have existed in a prior one. Just something to consider.


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#5 Blooded Dragon

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:34 PM

I can't believe I missed this thread. My story actually opens with the MC having an audience with his King. He has to prostrate himself to show his submissiveness, even despite being a noble himself.

 

The practice of revering a monarch and dressing them up in regalia actually comes from what Aristotle termed "Oriental Despotism." The subjects show absolute obedience and reverence for the head of state in order to ensure absolute power to the dictator in question who simultaneously embodied the state. The Roman Empire adopted this philosophy at some point during the third A.D. by the emperor Diocletian (who dissolved the last of Rome's few remaining republican functions and graduated the Principate into the Dominate) and its functions carried over into other Western societies that came after.

 

Caesaro-Papism is also a termed applied to a monarch who is also the head of church.

 

Statecraft involves lots of pomp and ceremony to give legitimacy to the state's actions. Even the image of a king sitting loftily in his throne room is in itself a powerful form of state propaganda. The king or emperor's throne would be incredibly ornate with gilded walls and pillars and even paintings or frescos. The idea is to inspire a sense of awe or even terror of the ruler who was sometimes also considered the right hand of their God, even whether in Christian or Islamic societies. The monarch would have a sense of his power since this propaganda would work just as much on him/her as their subjects.


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#6 Yuan Francois

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:43 PM

Hhmm... This particular Kingdom keeps church and state separate, so there is no Papacy.   Which is something I should change. 

 

I pictured the total submission part. The mc stands before a prince that will be crowned King. So he sits on a throne without a crown. This prince in particular hates formalities. He believes power should be shown in its rawest form. Without the ceremonies. Without the regalia.

 

But tell me more. Paint me a picture. 


"It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come."
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#7 Blooded Dragon

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:50 PM

Well, power is shown with ceremony and regalia. If this prince is trying to adopt more draconian measures he might have trouble exerting control over his own subjects or court administrators who would already be accustomed to doing things a certain way. A monarch's power is only absolute in theory. They still would have to be able to deal with their own court advisors and their people; they can't always simply act however they want and expect people to be compliant.

 

I'm not an expert on this of course and I know there are lots of examples of monarch's doing terrible things or showing their power in awful ways.


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#8 Yuan Francois

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:59 PM

The prince one over the people when he overcame and imprisoned the people that tried to invade and capture his father's kingdom. One of those persons is the mc. And also by his own means.

 

 

 

He buys the poor with loaves of bread, the needy with pairs of shoes and the prosperous with position. Brave men he seeks to enslave – to have them think they bid him ‘noble service.’ They’re guards on every corner where it gets too dark and people on every street who hold him, and his father, in high esteem. Through the eyes of ordinary men, he is royalty and has what he deserves. But through my eyes, he’s a man who has too much to control.

He has power. He has control.

What I need now is content. I need the scene painted. How the throne room would look. How the council will address the king. How the climate would change when the enemy is brought in bounded in chains.


"It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come."
-Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare 


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#9 Blooded Dragon

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:14 PM

Well, I guess that's really up to you to decide. Part of the fun of writing my story was inventing my own ceremonies and state functions. It does indeed sound like this prince may have too much power, especially when all those freebies and state services he's giving away pile debt onto his own country that banks will inevitably want to collect on in the future when his credit runs dry.

 

There are many form of address for a monarch such as "Your Grace" or "Your Majesty." If he's still a prince he might be addressed as "Highness" or "Royal Highness."

 

Keep in mind that he may also have other titles attributed to him other than his regal title. Say he fought back his country's invaders and later appropriated part of their land into his immediate control. He could either assign a lord to that land to run it or incorporate that office into his own title. So he could be, "Prince Reagent" of (insert country name) and "Lord/Duke/Margrave" of (insert conquered or appropriated territory). Heaping on more titles of office is how many monarchs consolidated their power. Emperor Napoleon for example was also the King of Italy.

 

When he's not referred to as Majesty or Grace depending on which you choose, he would also be addressed as Sire.

 

If you wanted, he could be riding around in a large, open carriage and paraded around the streets with his enemies in chains at his feet, like the ancient Roman generals used to do.

 

I would recommend doing research into European monarchies and how they were run.


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-Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra-On Reading and Writing

#10 Yuan Francois

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:20 PM

I will do my research. =)


"It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come."
-Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare 


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#11 gmelin

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 12:41 PM

I will do my research. =)


This is practically a no-brainier, but don't skip Machiavelli. Maybe Sun Tzu as well.

The person who is brutally honest enjoys the brutality quite as much as the honesty. Possibly more.

 

--Richard J. Needham

 


#12 CFAmick

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 01:40 PM

But through my eyes, he’s a man who has too much to control.

 

 

Based on this sentence, I would spend more time detailing the machinations of the throne room and the court than on the physical appearance. Perhaps the Prince has instituted a complicated protocol and is quick to penalize those who violate it. To the MC, this represents who the prince really is as a person, and the threat to everyone should he unleash it.



#13 Yuan Francois

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 04:41 PM

Based on this sentence, I would spend more time detailing the machinations of the throne room and the court than on the physical appearance. Perhaps the Prince has instituted a complicated protocol and is quick to penalize those who violate it. To the MC, this represents who the prince really is as a person, and the threat to everyone should he unleash it.

Good point Amick. I can really see something coming on here. 


"It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come."
-Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare 


http://enygmatickid.wordpress.com/

 

https://princeandpro....wordpress.com/





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