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How to Promote an E-Book


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#1 Tanya_Writes_YA

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:50 PM

Hi Guys!

 

I am doing some research on e-publishing, and I understand that to have ANY success, one must promote their book to death. I am wondering how one does this? I'm pretty clueless when it comes to e-publishing, so I would appreciate any insight from authors who have had success in this route.

 

Thanks!



#2 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:29 AM

That's really hard to answer, it can go in so many directions depending on your target age group, genre and budget. It is really hard to promote an orphan book, your best strategy is to keep writing, adding a second, third & fourth book will add to your brand and sales.

You need to identify your target audience and where you are most likely to find them. If you are writing YA or MG then it will be hard to sell a lot of e-books as those age groups sell the strongest as paperbacks, so you would have to target bookstores, libraries and schools.

As I said, a hard question to answer without knowing what sort of book/series you want to promote.

#3 Robin Breyer

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 01:56 AM

The best strategy is writing more books and being active in your genre. Promotion itself is less useful than being yourself, making connections, and getting your name out there. Blogs, forums, and other social media get your name out there and it takes little effort to then sell books. Plus books tend to sell themselves so delivering a professional product at all levels is vital.

Website, Blog

 

Writing as Scott Seldon:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

Writing as Robert Courtland:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

 

 


#4 Tanya_Writes_YA

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:51 AM

Thanks guys! I am looking at a YA Fantasy trilogy. I have no problems putting the package together including a good book cover etc. I am just clueless when it comes to the promotion aspect. I was told it was preferable for a newbie to do an exclusive with Amazon the first month? Is this correct?



#5 Robin Breyer

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:37 AM

If you want to try the KDP Select option, it requires a 90 day commitment. I only do it for non-novel items to help promote my novels. My novels go up everywhere as soon as possible. Right now I am working on a short story collection that will feature the first few chapters of my upcoming new fantasy novel. It should have around 40k in 4 stories plus the chapters. I'm going to do one KDP Select 90 period before I release the novel and then keep on as long as it looks successful.


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Writing as Scott Seldon:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

Writing as Robert Courtland:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

 

 


#6 Mark Friedlander

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 09:51 AM

If you want to try the KDP Select option, it requires a 90 day commitment. I only do it for non-novel items to help promote my novels. My novels go up everywhere as soon as possible. Right now I am working on a short story collection that will feature the first few chapters of my upcoming new fantasy novel. It should have around 40k in 4 stories plus the chapters. I'm going to do one KDP Select 90 period before I release the novel and then keep on as long as it looks successful.

Keep in mind that sales can vary wildly from month to month for no apparent reason but I found that the benefits of participating in the Select program vary depending on the book. For example,

 

1) my novella sells for $1.99 with a 35% royalty. That means I make 70ยข for each sale, but the Select program typically pays close to $2.00 for each loan. In March, one borrow on the Select program paid me  $2.10. I had to sell three books to make that amount.

 

2) One of my less popular books sells but rarely gets borrowed. On the other hand, my most popular book, during some months, gets borrowed more than the combined sales from all of my other books. In this case Select is Win/Win. Readers with Kindles and Prime membership get the book for free and I still get about the same royalty as I would from a sale.

 

As a result, I'm leaving the novella and my most popular title in the Select program but I pulled the less popular book from Select to repub it on B&N, Smashwords and Apple. (I don't do the other channels due tho their lack of responsiveness when I want to take a title off the market.)

 

I think you need to run some tests and see what works best for each title. Try Select for three months and then try publishing the same book elsewhere for three months to see how it does

 

As far as marketing goes, I think Robin is correct, the best promo is a good book followed by a better book. I also think that giving away the first in a series for free is a productive way to obtain needed exposure.

 

Good luck,

Mark


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#7 Jinsune

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:24 PM

Hi Guys!

 

I am doing some research on e-publishing, and I understand that to have ANY success, one must promote their book to death. I am wondering how one does this? I'm pretty clueless when it comes to e-publishing, so I would appreciate any insight from authors who have had success in this route.

 

Thanks!

 

I've never self published, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

 

I think that you have to spread the word about it. Word of mouth is usually the best way to go because it gets people excited and talking about your work. You could also try contests and give away a copy or two of your book to the winner.

 

I do think that if you gain more exposure, you might get your work out there faster. Try being a guest on a book blog or something like that. If you're close to a radio station, ask if they will do an interview with you on-air, or see if you can have an ad placed in a magazine or something. This might be expensive to do, though because you would more than likely have to pay the magazine quite a bit of money just to do this. The same goes for TV slots, but I'm not so sure about the radio.

 

As one other person already said, you could churn out book after book after book like Amanda Hocking and hope for the best. It might be strenuous, but it's possible.

 

I've also heard that Twitter is essential, but in my opinion I think it's optional.






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