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New Adult Genre


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#1 Jearl Rugh

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 10:33 PM

I recently heard about this fairly new genre for 18-25 year old protagonists. Do you know of agents specifically seeking novel length projects? I've seen a couple, but there has to be more.



#2 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 11:08 PM

NA is not a genre but an age group - like MG and YA. For the last couple of years indies have been doing incredibly well with NA romances and it continues to be very strong in romance and has yet to break into other genres.

 

NA Alley is a great resource and keeps a list of publishers and agents actively seeking NA novels (again mainly focused on romance) http://www.naalley.c...publishing.html



#3 jughead

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:47 AM

I'm thinking that because NA is so new, many agents haven't bothered to update their guidelines to include it. If they advertise that they handle YA, it's probably safe to submit your NA novel without being thought ignorant.

 

 



#4 RC Lewis

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:25 PM

I'm thinking that because NA is so new, many agents haven't bothered to update their guidelines to include it. If they advertise that they handle YA, it's probably safe to submit your NA novel without being thought ignorant.

 

I'd have to disagree with that. The agents I know who rep NA are very enthusiastic and vocal about this fact ... and YA agents who don't rep it get very annoyed with queries for it cluttering up their inboxes.

 

For the most part, imprints that are taking on NA projects are completely different from YA imprints. At this point, I think you're more likely to find overlap in agents who rep contemporary romance (and yes, they might rep YA as well ... most agents rep several things), but still do your research and find agents who really are looking for it. They'll be the ones who are up-to-date and knowledgeable about where to submit.


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#5 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:47 PM

I'm thinking that because NA is so new, many agents haven't bothered to update their guidelines to include it. If they advertise that they handle YA, it's probably safe to submit your NA novel without being thought ignorant.


Please don't do this. There's a big difference thematically between YA and NA. You may be thought ignorant for not knowing the difference and you will be auto rejected for not reading submission guidelines.

#6 jughead

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 04:53 PM

RC, could you give me some examples of publishers who handle one but not the other?



#7 sharpegirl

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:43 PM

NA has been around as a publishing term and idea since 2009. It was coined by St. Martin's Press. The agents interested in it have had 5 years to update their sub guidelines. 

 

RC said imprints. Not publishers. Different things. 

 

Flirt is Random House's NA imprint. Embrace is Entangled's NA imprint. Zest books just opened a NA imprint. I think it's called Pulp? 

 

There are some imprints that look for both YA and NA. Amazon and Alloy just teamed up to form one, it was announced just a few days ago. But not all of them do. A majority of YA imprints are exclusively YA (or sometimes fall under the "Children's" umbrella), and a YA agent may not have the same connections as someone who has sold in the burgeoning NA Sphere already. Nor may an agent who lists YA as one of their interests be interested in representing NA. Remember that NA really took off in the Self Published World and continues to really flourish there (and kudos to all those savvy SP'ers who saw a gap in the market and filled it). But in terms of traditionally published work and shelf space (and where to shelve it), it's still evolving and finding its footing. This is where an agent who has connections with the still evolving traditionally published NA world comes in, and why it's important to query agents who are actively seeking NA. 

 

Some agents do represent both YA and NA. But the point here is, if an agent doesn't list an age category on their "What I'm looking for" page, it's probably not best to query them. It's not following submission guidelines. You wouldn't query an agent who only represents adult work with a picture book, right? 



#8 RC Lewis

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:07 PM

Because I'm a masochist...

 

Here are the imprints listed in the 28 New Adult deals announced in Publishers Marketplace since the start of 2014. (They only started posting by that category last year, and out of the 49 deals total, only 2 publishers aren't listed below—Mira and Sourcebooks.) That doesn't mean every deal ever is in here, but it's pretty inclusive. The publisher over that imprint is listed in parentheses where applicable.

 

* * * * *

 

-Harlequin (HarperCollins): Love Inspired imprint which has several subgenres. No YA (HarlequinTeen handles that)

 

-Avon (HarperCollins). No YA (as a rule ... in 214 deals since 2004, Avon has listed ONE YA)

 

-William Morrow (HarperCollins). No YA

 

-Berkley (Penguin). No YA in the past 12 months. (14 YA deals out of 861 since 2004 ... If someone wants to know when those were, aren't I looking up enough?) :tongue:

 

-Atria (Simon & Schuster). No YA (as a rule ... one YA in past 12 months, only one out of 354 since 2004)

 

-Gallery (Simon & Schuster). No YA in past 12 months. (2 since 2004 out of 222)

 

-Ashland Creek Press (small press). No YA. Only 3 deals listed, one of which is NA.

 

-Tor (Macmillan). Cover everything from children's to adult. (But I think they also have a Tor Teen division. They've only listed deals for 2 NAs so far.)

 

-Martin Brown Publishers (small press). Only 2 deals listed, one NA.

 

-Skyscape (Amazon). Mostly YA, one NA listed. 12 deals overall.

 

-Swoon Romance/Month9Books (Georgia McBride Media Group). Mostly NAs go to Swoon (almost entirely digital), but one is cross-publishing w/ Month9. YAs go to either.

 

-Ballantine (Random House). No YA as a rule. One YA out of 379 deals since 2004.

 

-NAL (Penguin). 1 YA in past year, 13 since 2004 out of 574 deals.

 

-Forever (Hachette). No YA.

 

-St. Martin's (Macmillan). Huge imprint, covers darn near everything.

 

* * * * *

 

Also worth noting that at least half a dozen of those deals were listed as previously self-published.

 

As for who publishes YA and not NA? I'm not going to sift through that, but off the top of my head, here are some YA/children's imprints I didn't see on that list.

 

Disney-Hyperion, Katherine Tegen, HarperTeen, Feiwel & Friends, Razorbill, Little Brown, Flux, Bloomsbury Children's, S&S BFYR (Books for Young Readers) ... lots more, I'm sure.

 

And that's the thing. Many/most YA books are published by imprints that specialize in kids' books and handle picture books through YA. NA (as it stands thus far!) in many ways has more in common with adult romance, so it isn't something that fits under the right umbrella for a lot of YA publishers.


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#9 jughead

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:13 PM

LOL. American traditional publishers released about 200,000 titles last year, but PM lists only about 40-50 per day. Additionally, many of those line items are for new rights deals on pre-existing titles.

 

Lack of a listing, doesn't mean lack of a deal. A better metric for big-picture trends, is to follow the daily newsletter of Publisher's Lunch.

 

PM reports NA only for ebooks, not for print.

 

Morrow is an adult imprint. False test.

 

All of the bigger publishers have dozens of imprints. Many of the editors handle more than one genre and more than one imprint.

 

Strange logic there.



#10 RC Lewis

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:54 PM

Wow. You really DON'T read, do you? :huh:

 

Publishers Lunch is put out by Publishers Marketplace. Their Deals section links to the exact same place I got my line items from.

 

I *said* several of those deals were for rights on previously self-published books. That's an important point because someone wanting to publish NA should know how things are looking as far as what big publishers are buying.

 

I *said* it doesn't represent all deals, but it's the broadest, most "complete" listing available.

 

If you look at my list, ALMOST ALL of those I listed are adult imprints.

 

And no, PM lists both print and digital NA, separately. Beginning last year ... I was looking only at the print deals.

 

I'm not at a Big-5 publisher, but several friends are. Sure, some editors handle more than one genre (and in YA it's fairly required—they handle several genres within the CATEGORY of YA). Some editors may work for multiple imprints. Personally, I don't know of any within the world of YA. As I mentioned above, some imprints themselves are large enough that they cover a wide range of age categories, so editors in that case are more likely to work across those categories.

 

You asked the question, I answered to the best of my ability in the time I have available. If your point is that it's fine to submit to agents who rep YA but do NOT specify NA because they'll still know the right editors, I continue to disagree. My reasons are above.


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#11 AQCrew

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 12:07 AM

Here are the imprints listed in the 28 New Adult deals announced in Publishers Marketplace since the start of 2014. (They only started posting by that category last year, and out of the 49 deals total, only 2 publishers aren't listed below—Mira and Sourcebooks.) That doesn't mean every deal ever is in here, but it's pretty inclusive. The publisher over that imprint is listed in parentheses where applicable.

 

 

RC Lewis - That's an incredibly fascinating post in more ways than one... we had no idea that PM only started tracking New Adult deals last year.

 

The New Adult label is really one of the most difficult things to discuss because it's gotten so, so, so... very complicated... it was shunned for so long by the industry and by agents -- on the whole -- and then the indie self-publishing world embraced it and started spitting out bestsellers like hotcakes, and now it seems to have rebounded as a viable saleable marketing "label" (from what we can tell within the traditional publishing world) -- but only within certain genres like romance and erotica, and only if your book adheres to some very specifically defined NA attributes (like POV, age of characters, level of "edgy", controversial content, etc.)

 

For anyone interested in the New Adult label and all its implications, you should read the following threads:

 

http://agentquerycon...-new-hot-genre/

 

http://agentquerycon...ats-its-status/

 

Best of luck to all those attempting to write NA or label their manuscript as "New Adult".  New Adult is a complicated world to navigate -- both on the indie self-publishing side and the traditional side.



#12 sharpegirl

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 05:51 PM

I also really like this post by Dahlia Adler about her thoughts on New Adult and publishing it traditionally vs. self publishing it. She has some very interesting insights: http://dailydahlia.w...think-about-na/






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