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How much ADVANCE did you earn?


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#1 Ajax

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:03 AM

I am trying to gain knowledge about the advance payments. I merely know that the advances vary across genres.

Please respond if you are traditionally published...

#2 sharpegirl

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:11 AM

Just a heads up, this is kind of one of those questions that everyone wonders, but it's not considered terribly polite to actually ask. It's like asking a coworker how much they make per hour/year. Most businesses have rules about sharing that kind of information for a reason. And most writers aren't going to feel comfortable disclosing something like this. 



#3 Jeanne

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:21 AM

I would add that some publishers have non-disclosure clauses in their contracts. In other words, you aren't allowed to discuss your royalty percentages or advance on public forums. I've seen at least one instance of where a writer blogged about her advance and royalties and was asked by the publisher to take the posts down.

 

It's a touchy subject for many reasons. Publishers don't reward their authors equally. A good agent can negotiate much better terms than the standard contract. Some publishers pay a larger advance and smaller royalties or vice versa.

 

If you check PM statistics, you may be able to get a general idea of who gets how much and in what genres, but their ranges are very broad.

 

One other thought-- A HUGE advance is not always a good thing. If your first book doesn't earn out, you may not be able to sell your second book. This very thing happened to a friend of mine who writes historical fiction.

 

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#4 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:28 AM

Most contracts have NDA clauses, so the money side can't be discussed. Many small presses don't pay advances but pay higher percentages instead, so it can work out more advantageous depending on your genre.

There's lots of anecdotal evidence if you google author earnings.

Edit: here's a link to a discussion on QT about money & advances. It has a link to the cached blog post where a trad published author discussed her advance but I don't know if the link works anymore.
http://querytracker....p?topic=15603.0

#5 Litgal

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    In between I became a "hybrid" as part of a group of six authors involved in a high concept novel-in-six-parts called "A Day of Fire" which released in November of 2014. The book, "A Day of Fire," tells the story of the final days of the doomed city of Pompeii in a way you've never read it before.

Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

This is going to be a hard one for you to research and you'd do better to look for blogs/articles that already discuss advance ranges by genre. Because, frankly, most author's would rather give you specifics of their sex lives than numbers. 


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#6 AQCrew

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:22 AM

author-earnings-by-genre-and-publisher-t



#7 AQCrew

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:33 AM

The above posted chart doesn't show book advances, but it does break down authors' ebook earnings from Amazon by genre.

 

Wowzers... if you want to know what's truly happening in the book publishing industry and how much authors are $making$, read the entire article:

 

http://authorearning...arnings-report/



#8 Litgal

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    In between I became a "hybrid" as part of a group of six authors involved in a high concept novel-in-six-parts called "A Day of Fire" which released in November of 2014. The book, "A Day of Fire," tells the story of the final days of the doomed city of Pompeii in a way you've never read it before.

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:45 AM

And apparently talking about money is more prevalent now:
http://op-talk.blogs...type=blogs&_r=0
 


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#9 mwsinclair

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:38 PM

Note to self: learn how to write romance and thrillers ;-)

#10 Blitzing

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 01:02 PM

author-earnings-by-genre-and-publisher-t

 Makes me glad I write romance :p


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#11 KirkDJohnston

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 06:42 AM

I find it a bit worrying how basically everyone in here is saying that no one usually talks openly about this kind of stuff, and in many cases are even prevented from doing so by publisher and NDAs.

 

Personally, I think it would help if people were open and honest about stuff like this, and just in general, especially in a place that's supposed to be specifically about helping writers learn and figure out the craft and the business.

 

If we aren't even comfortable telling each other, or even able to tell each other these kinds of things in here of all places, if it's still all cloak-and-dagger, then I fear we're just getting stuck in some kind of elite club mentality, where you only get to know the real/important ins and outs of the business properly if you're somehow part of the inner circle--and only a lucky few get into that circle (usually not the ones doing the actual creative writing but the ones trying to make money off of the backs of those writers, I expect--all the middlemen), leaving everyone else slightly clueless and ripe for a little bit of exploitation and abuse in the name of profit and greed.

 

It's like when I used to work for Rockstar games and they put it in your contract that you could't discuss with anyone else what you earned. I simply do not like that, as it means the company can be pretty sly with paying each individual maybe a lower wage than they deserve, or giving a select few people far more than they deserve, but no one is able to talk about it and maybe argue for fairer pay or whatever because they've all been silenced. So all becomes slightly uncomfortable as people never really feel like anyone is being open and honest. It creates a very surface level, superficial, and fake behaviour built around the largely hidden and manipulative effects of money, and the control it gives some people over others, in my opinion.

 

If everything was/is on the up and up then why should any of it need to be kept secret? Or is it maybe because, and this is something I'm worried about, most people actually get far less than they deserve, probably so low a figure they are slightly ashamed of it, and once again an elite few get most of the money in the pot--as is the case in almost every industry and system I've come across--probably, again, those who aren't even writing the novels in this case but just a bunch of middlemen getting rich off the backs of the people writing the novels, who without all the middlemen could probably do things a lot more easily/simply, without all the red tape and extra hoops to jump through, and probably make more money at the end of the day as result. It's almost like some people want to keep the mystery so that normal people don't find out there is no actual genius behind being good at something and being successful, but more just working hard at what you love, probably being fortunate enough to have money already, and likely knowing the right people most of the time--which sadly isn't possible for most people, but the people profiting of your talent and taking a chunk of your money don't want you to know that or else they likely lose a whole lot of clients over night.

 

It's sort of like how film stars want to keep that air of mystery and superiority to them, so people worship them like they are something special that's beyond normal folk, when in reality they are just ordinary people who got the kind of opportunities that most other people are never afforded--precisely because it's a bit of an elite inner circle that only welcomes in its own, as it were (probably people who are the sons and daughters of already wealthy and successful actors, singers, writers, etc).

 

All I know is that for me it's important to know facts and figures for costs, sales, fees, etc., and all the other hidden expenses that may be involved in writing and publishing a book, many of which I expect come from the agents and publishers rather than it being any kind of expense the writer would ideally want to incur. I think knowing how much the average writer gets as an advances is something that should be common knowledge, easily accessible information, and especially in a place like this. I actually think all these kinds of number should be available to check in some kind of easily readable list or something that's constantly updated to reflect the current state of the industry. I know I'd find that very useful.

 

Rant over. lol



#12 Andrea Lambert

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 03:27 PM

I'll be honest here because that's how I roll. I published two books right out of my MFA program with MFA hookups on small presses and in both cases there was no advance and no royalties. The only time I was able to make money off the books was when I sold individual copies at readings (which I did do, I used to read out a lot).

 

If you publish on a small press they usually can't afford to pay you because they're on such a shoestring themselves. I know this from my short stint running a small press.

 

Larger presses= no idea what that's like.Ii'm trying to break into that. That's why I'm here.


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GoodReads Author bio: https://www.goodread....Andrea_Lambert

 

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JET SET DESOLATE from Future Fiction London on Amazon: http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/0578016257

 

LORAZEPAM & THE VALLEY OF SKIN: EXTRAPOLATIONS ON LOS ANGELES from valeveil: http://www.valeveil.se/posts/196
 

HAUNTING MUSES from Bedazzled Ink on Amazon: http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/194383752X

 

WRITING THE WALLS DOWN: A CONVERGENCE OF LGBTQ VOICES from Trans-Genre Press: http://trans-genre.n...the-walls-down/
 
THE L.A. TELEPHONE BOOK, VOL. 1 from ARRAS.NET: http://www.arras.net/?page_id=658

 

 





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