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#1 Ajax

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 11:46 AM

I've found laughably scarce information for writers querying American agents from the non-American territories. Therefore, I am moved to initiate this thread.

I'll be covering various topics in subsequent posts. Feel free to join the conversation even if you are from the U.S.

First things first :
Your manuscript needs to be in English. Translate it to English if you wrote it in Japanese.

#2 JackW

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 03:08 AM

Dutch guy writing a book in English and trying to get it published in the US, checking in.



#3 Tanja

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 04:41 AM

This sounds like an interesting topic as I am Swiss, moved to Australia and trying to get published in the US


Query:  10 DAY BETRAYAL

             10 DAY CONSPIRACY

             RABBIT 76 (NEW PROJECT)

 

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#4 Ajax

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 08:31 AM

Helpful links :

How hard is it to get an agent from U.S. if you aren't American?

A Canadian perspective

The Language Barriers

Your rights with the international publishers

#5 Ireth

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 08:52 AM

Good stuff to know about. I'm Canadian, writing in English. :)


There's too much blood in my tea system. Time to put the kettle on.

 

~~~

 

All projects except WINTER'S QUEEN are currently on hiatus until further notice. Thank you!

 

Queries:

Winter's Queen: http://agentquerycon...een-ya-fantasy/

Tenth Realm: http://agentquerycon...e-epic-fantasy/

Low Road: http://agentquerycon...orical-fantasy/

Moonhunter: http://agentquerycon...ya-xenofiction/

Song of the Sea: http://agentquerycon...sea-ya-fantasy/

My Soul to Keep: http://agentquerycon...porary-fantasy/

Dancing On Edges: http://agentquerycon...porary-fantasy/

Bellringer: http://agentquerycon...ringer-fantasy/

 

Hooks:

Winter's Queen: http://agentquerycon...tasy-hook-help/

Tenth Realm: http://agentquerycon...k-epic-fantasy/

Low Road: http://agentquerycon...fantasyvampire/

Moonhunter: http://agentquerycon...ya-xenofiction/

Song of the Sea: http://agentquerycon...ong-of-the-sea/

My Soul to Keep: http://agentquerycon...porary-fantasy/

Dancing on Edges: http://agentquerycon...asy-query-hook/

 

Synopses:

Winter's Queen: http://agentquerycon...een-ya-fantasy/

Tenth Realm: http://agentquerycon...ntasy-synopsis/

Low Road: http://agentquerycon...fantasyvampire/

My Soul to Keep: http://agentquerycon...porary-fantasy/


#6 Judy Mohr

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 02:52 PM

I took a quick look through those links that you suggested, Ajax, and I must say that I'm not surprised by any of the comments.

I live in New Zealand (also know as Middle Earth to some). English is my first language, so I have no issue with translating, unless you want to consider the whole UK English vs US English, which is an entirely different matter. (New Zealand uses UK English.)

The market in New Zealand for my genre is incredible limited, if not non-existant. As such, all authors of fantasy eventually move to overseas markets at some point regardless whether they are traditionally published or indie-published. I have chosen to try the US market first.

When looking for an agent, I have the following criteria: must work through email (not snail-mail); have a proven record with overseas clients; be willing to work with new writers. This is in addition to the standard "have an interest in my genre".

I don't think being an international makes it any harder. It's just hard -- full-stop. Expect rejections. Expect to put the hard work in. All you need is that one "yes", but it could easily be the 500th agent/publisher you contact, as it could be the 1st. JK Rowling had how many rejections before Harry Potter was published?

Just my thoughts.

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Writer and Editor

 

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Facebook: facebook.com/JudyLMohr

Personal Blog: judylmohr.com

Website: blackwolfeditorial.com


#7 Ajax

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 07:46 AM

I took a quick look through those links that you suggested, Ajax, and I must say that I'm not surprised by any of the comments.I live in New Zealand (also know as Middle Earth to some). English is my first language, so I have no issue with translating, unless you want to consider the whole UK English vs US English, which is an entirely different matter. (New Zealand uses UK English.)The market in New Zealand for my genre is incredible limited, if not non-existant. As such, all authors of fantasy eventually move to overseas markets at some point regardless whether they are traditionally published or indie-published. I have chosen to try the US market first.When looking for an agent, I have the following criteria: must work through email (not snail-mail); have a proven record with overseas clients; be willing to work with new writers. This is in addition to the standard "have an interest in my genre".I don't think being an international makes it any harder. It's just hard -- full-stop. Expect rejections. Expect to put the hard work in. All you need is that one "yes", but it could easily be the 500th agent/publisher you contact, as it could be the 1st. JK Rowling had how many rejections before Harry Potter was published?Just my thoughts.


It's always reassuring to know that publishing in the U.S. is not an insurmountable task. Thank you! :)

#8 Tanvi

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:15 AM

So, I'm based in India with both English and Hindi as my native language. I've always seen US as a more natural market for YA so I queried US agents for my first project. It garnered a lot of interest but ultimately the revisions didn't work out. It was my fault, because, in retrospect, I wasn't that invested in the story. :/

 

I thought I'd share this because obviously if I got requests even while I disclosed my location in the query, it's not that difficult to get an American agent interested :)

 

I'm getting ready to query my second project -- I have more faith and love for this so I'm willing to spend time on any R&Rs -- now so hoping for the best!



#9 Ajax

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:04 AM

So, I'm based in India with both English and Hindi as my native language. I've always seen US as a more natural market for YA so I queried US agents for my first project. It garnered a lot of interest but ultimately the revisions didn't work out. It was my fault, because, in retrospect, I wasn't that invested in the story. :/

I thought I'd share this because obviously if I got requests even while I disclosed my location in the query, it's not that difficult to get an American agent interested :)

I'm getting ready to query my second project -- I have more faith and love for this so I'm willing to spend time on any R&Rs -- now so hoping for the best!


That's interesting. Did the agents made it prerequisite to mention your nationality or was it your independent decision?

Good luck with the second project! :)

#10 Enoise

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 12:46 PM

This is a very interesting topic. I guess I’ve somehow been searching for a thread like this where I could express my views.

I’m from Nigeria, and the first thing I would like to say is that there are no literary agencies in Nigeria. The link is straight from the writer to the printer. Yes, I said printer because in Nigeria, we also don’t have publishers, just a bunch of printers, parading themselves as publishers. You pay them to get your work printed; you even pay a reading fee. The only few worthy publishers frown at genre fiction and only publish books that are likely to be recommended by the Ministry of Education, or books that have already gained fame overseas and the authors deem it fit to have a few copies in the country. No one would blame the publishers because it’s a fact that Nigerians don’t read. The average Nigerian is so engrossed thinking of his next meal that he has no time to glance at a good work of fiction. Nigerian students have been imbibed with the mindset that you only read novels to pass exams, so it has become a chore.

I have queried some few US and UK agents. Though I wouldn’t say the rejections are solely due to my nationality, but I can’t help thinking that also has a thing to do with it. The agents probably have lots of good books streaming into their emails from indigenous writers. I think they would first consider those.

There are some well-known Nigerian authors that are published abroad, represented by US agents. Permit me to call those authors half-Nigerians. They spend most of their time overseas and only spare few visits to Nigeria. I’ve never heard of a full Nigerian-based author published in the US, but I hope to.

Another thing is even if your book eventually gets accepted by a US agent, you should be expecting some questions as to how you plan on marketing the book from Nigeria since you’re not in the US and have no connection there. Although starting a blog could be helpful, I doubt if that would be enough. I’m actually thinking of starting one.

It is fairly easy to say that the contents and setting of the book also play a huge role. I’m a Nigerian so I write about Nigeria in order to be true and realistic in expressing my views. I’ve never been to the US, thus I don’t want my novel to be set there. But I very much want it to be published there, because as much as it’s hard to say, my target audiences are US or UK citizens.

I really wish my book would sell more in Nigeria, but the truth is that is very unlikely because Nigerians don’t read and books are not well circulated in Nigeria. Just this week, I searched all the bookshops in my city for a book written by an indigenous author. I couldn’t find it; most booksellers haven’t even heard of it even though it was published by a traditional publisher. So I have no choice but to buy an online copy.

The ideal Nigerian author will have his book self-published and will further undergo the task of marketing it himself, going from bookshop to bookshop, whether the book is well-crafted or not. A friend of mine spent a hundred and fifty thousand naira publishing and printing a play of less than 200 pages, and now he can barely count on any profit or even the circulation of the book. So I think self-publication in Nigeria is out of my options. I’m still hooked on publishing abroad. I just hope to one day find the right agent.I have much to say but I think I should stop here to avoid deviating than what I’ve already done.

Finally, I think it's not impossible for a non-US writer to find a US agent. You should only query widely and be prepared to run the tasks of promoting your book from your country.

#11 Ajax

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 01:03 PM

I have queried some few US and UK agents. Though I wouldn’t say the rejections are solely due to my nationality, but I can’t help thinking that also has a thing to do with it. The agents probably have lots of good books streaming into their emails from indigenous writers. I think they would first consider those.


A professional agent would judge you only by your ability to write. To her, every query is a priority.

Another thing is even if your book eventually gets accepted by a US agent, you should be expecting some questions as to how you plan on marketing the book from Nigeria since you’re not in the US and have no connection there. Although starting a blog could be helpful, I doubt if that would be enough. I’m actually thinking of starting one.


These are few effective ways to promote your book in the foreign markets :

1. Online platform : I advocate blogging to build a readership. This way, you would have an audience to spread the word about the book.

2. Connect with book tubers and book bloggers : E-mail the electronic ARCs or free copies of your work to the online review communities.

3. International contests : Writing contests like the annual Commonwealth Short Story Contest are a great way to get exposure and recognition.

4. For further reading, click here and here

#12 Whimsical_Werecat

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 12:46 AM

Well hello there, fellow international writers! I'm an Australian indie author/ illustrator, with over half my readership being international.

 

These days, more than ever before, there are fantastic opportunities for authors to connect and contribute and get their works published, not matter where in the world you are located. But I can understand how tricky it can be, especially when it comes to language barriers and variations (I too write in UK English, even though I have a lot of readers from the US).

 

Even if you decide to focus on one avenue of publishing, I think it's important to study up and learn about the other areas, too. There's so much to explore and learn!

 

Ajax had some great tips and made available some great resources and links.

 

Keep swimming, guys. The waters are big, but the possibilities are out there. You just need to seek them out. :)


cover-art-kin-seeker-text-2-100x150.jpg                            cover-art-beacon-thrones-3-100x150.jpg                            final-flight-ebook-cover-100x150.jpg
KIN SEEKER                                    BEACON THRONES                        FINAL FLIGHT
Book One of Dragon Calling         Book Two of Dragon Calling           Starsea Press
Starsea Press                                  Starsea Press
 
Facebook                                       Facebook
Goodreads                                     Goodreads
Pinterest                                         Pinterest


#13 Ash_

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 12:48 AM

This is a great topic to discuss - as an Australian fantasy writer there seems to be Buckleys chance (colloquialism for: 'an extremely remote possibility') of picking up representation in Australia. After reveiwing the slim pickings at home I'll be querying US agents from the get go.  At least in our modern, internet age this appears to be relatively straight forward, and the US market is magnitudes larger than the Australian one.



#14 Guest_AWExley_*

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 01:17 AM

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#15 Whimsical_Werecat

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    KIN SEEKER (Book One in the Dragon Calling series), published by Starsea Press, available in eBook and paperback at all leading online retailers.

    THE BEACON THRONES(Book Two in the Dragon Calling Series), published by Starsea Press, available in eBook and paperback at all leading online retailers.

Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:24 AM

 

This is a great topic to discuss - as an Australian fantasy writer there seems to be Buckleys chance (colloquialism for: 'an extremely remote possibility') of picking up representation in Australia.

 

Sure, the chances are small, especially for an emerging writer. But it can happen. I recently had two friends (who co-wrote a children's fantasy series and self-published), catch the eye of Hachette Australia because they were doing very well for themselves. They now have a publishing contract with Hachette, and their books will be re-released, starting this year.

 

But you are right in that our list of agencies and publishers here in Oz are much less than the US. At least in this day and age, location doesn't matter (as AWExley mentioned).


cover-art-kin-seeker-text-2-100x150.jpg                            cover-art-beacon-thrones-3-100x150.jpg                            final-flight-ebook-cover-100x150.jpg
KIN SEEKER                                    BEACON THRONES                        FINAL FLIGHT
Book One of Dragon Calling         Book Two of Dragon Calling           Starsea Press
Starsea Press                                  Starsea Press
 
Facebook                                       Facebook
Goodreads                                     Goodreads
Pinterest                                         Pinterest


#16 Ajax

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 12:30 PM

Apologies for this late update...

I finally tracked down J.F. Penn, a British author with an American agent. She was kind enough to talk about her adventures:

On getting an American agent

On literary agent

#17 Ajax

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 01:01 PM

This is a great topic to discuss - as an Australian fantasy writer there seems to be Buckleys chance (colloquialism for: 'an extremely remote possibility') of picking up representation in Australia. After reveiwing the slim pickings at home I'll be querying US agents from the get go. At least in our modern, internet age this appears to be relatively straight forward, and the US market is magnitudes larger than the Australian one.


The American market is tempting, I agree. I'd suggest you to choose it if your book appeals to the American readership. Size and other demographics should be your secondary considerations.

Isobelle Carmody lives in Australia, and her books are read everywhere.

#18 Ajax

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 06:50 AM

Literary Agents For International Writers

When you google search an agent, you will learn a great deal about her. You will learn that she owns an agitated cat. You will learn about her disturbing addiction to food porn. You will also learn that she represents young adult books.

But...

It's often not clear whether she is open to international writers or not.

It is understandable, agents receive the major chunk of queries from their homeland. There is no need for them to request queries from Barcelona.

I used Twitter to personally ask the agents. The replies were always positive. In conclusion, agents would specify on their websites if they do not consider international writers. If it isn't exclusively stated, you should read it as a 'yes'.

How do you research on the agents?

Helpful link:

Do You Know Your Agent?

#19 CS_W

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 08:22 AM

Brazilian living in Switzerland, writing in English, checking in : )



#20 Ajax

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 11:22 AM

Brazilian living in Switzerland, writing in English, checking in : )


Bom dia to you! :)





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