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quantum entanglement teleportation space travel space-time continuum relativity

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#1 camosrun

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 06:04 AM

I am writing a book that involves space travel via teleportation.  Because it is science-fiction, I want to ensure the science is at least plausible, since science-fiction readers are nit-picky when it comes to that sort of thing.  The idea follows the theory that all space is the same space. It is in the minds of the conscious observer that space is separated and the bodies are the vehicle by which to travel through that separated space.  However, in the future that the book is based, a platform device exists that causes the two to switch places.  The body becomes that which separates space and the mind is the vehicle by which to travel through it, ergo, someone steps on the platform device, thinks of a location, and is instantaneously teleported there.  Does this make since enough to be good science fiction?



#2 wildworks

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 09:08 PM

Sure, I don't see why not. It's science fiction. You take elements of science and bend them past the breaking point to create a story. Just make sure you are consistent.

Also, it's similar to the form of travel discovered at the end of Xenocide by Orsen Scott Card.

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#3 camosrun

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 11:02 PM

Thanks!  I am actually not a very big fan of Orson Scott Card.  I've read a couple of his books, but Xenocide is not one of them. I'll look into that as I do not want to take someone else's idea.



#4 wildworks

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 09:25 AM

There are thousands of books with similar ideas. It's impossible to avoid. You just have to make sure yours seems unique. Also, in Xenocide travel was done mental through a sentient artificial intelligents by holding an exact, to the atom, image of the travelers in mind. then just choosing where to go.



#5 camosrun

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 05:26 PM

It's somewhat unique then. Once someone steps upon this platform, it shuts down a set of neurons in the mind that specifically ensure space is separated.  Once done, space collapses upon itself only to reform as the travellers destination.



#6 llLeoll

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 09:51 PM

Card is a great example. The ansible from Ender's Game, which allows instantaneous communication across interstellar distances,  shows how a science fiction writer can work from speculative science. After all, the speed of light is an established speed limit within the relativistic framework. Who knows what tomorrow brings?

 

Another fact: Card stole the ansible from Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed (hihgly recommended, by the way) -- a story of the physicist who discovers that principle. 

 

However, current science does allow for "faster than light" travel and communication. But that is limited to the quantum level. You may want to Google "quantum eraser" -- though I would stay away from the New Age/ Law of Attraction type of sites. The experiment's results imply that, on the quantum level, "entangled" particles's can communicate instantly. 

 

Right now, we cannot apply this to the macro level. But who knows what a future engineer can dream up?

 

Speculation, thy name is science fiction. 

 

The biggest issue you would have with science fiction fans -- especially the hard-core science nuts like me -- is the separation of mind/ body thing. For instance, would making an exact replica of the cells in my body necessarily replicate my mind? What level of replication would you need to replicate me? A basic blueprint of my neural-net? Or, in addition to that, a record of the position of every single neuron? Or would yo uhave to go even deeper -- a record of the state of every neuron; the level of individual neurotransmitters at each synapse; the exact ion state of every organic molecule in the sodium channel; down to the quantum-state... etc.?

 

Sorry for that level of detail, but I do think about this stuff. Have since I was a wee 'un watching Star Trek


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#7 RSMellette

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 10:06 AM

You should read Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand. :) I deal with some similar stuff - though with plenty of Fi in my Sci.

 

It's not a huge leap to get to an entangled quantum computer. The bitch would be delivering the physical computers around the universe to create a universal wide web.

 

You might also look at the hologram model of the universe. I'm not well-versed in that one, but it's promising for Science-Fiction writers.

 

In Billy Bobble, one of my premises is that thoughts are electrical impulses (true), and that makes them a real, tangible thing (somewhat true). At a quantum level, these thoughts create their own reality (fiction).

 

I always thing of writing Sci-Fi like doing stage magic. You make sure the audience is watching the real science while you're palming a bit of fiction in the other hand.


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#8 camosrun

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 04:51 PM

Card is a great example. The ansible from Ender's Game, which allows instantaneous communication across interstellar distances,  shows how a science fiction writer can work from speculative science. After all, the speed of light is an established speed limit within the relativistic framework. Who knows what tomorrow brings?

 

Another fact: Card stole the ansible from Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed (hihgly recommended, by the way) -- a story of the physicist who discovers that principle. 

 

However, current science does allow for "faster than light" travel and communication. But that is limited to the quantum level. You may want to Google "quantum eraser" -- though I would stay away from the New Age/ Law of Attraction type of sites. The experiment's results imply that, on the quantum level, "entangled" particles's can communicate instantly. 

 

Right now, we cannot apply this to the macro level. But who knows what a future engineer can dream up?

 

Speculation, thy name is science fiction. 

 

The biggest issue you would have with science fiction fans -- especially the hard-core science nuts like me -- is the separation of mind/ body thing. For instance, would making an exact replica of the cells in my body necessarily replicate my mind? What level of replication would you need to replicate me? A basic blueprint of my neural-net? Or, in addition to that, a record of the position of every single neuron? Or would yo uhave to go even deeper -- a record of the state of every neuron; the level of individual neurotransmitters at each synapse; the exact ion state of every organic molecule in the sodium channel; down to the quantum-state... etc.?

 

Sorry for that level of detail, but I do think about this stuff. Have since I was a wee 'un watching Star Trek

 

To help explain this a bit more, I'm going to give you a small excerpt from my book in which one of my characters uses this device.  Quantum entanglement was actually the first thought that I had when trying to figure out space travel.  I thought about how an exact copy of an electron could be made, taken to the other side of the universe, and respond instantly to any stimulation of its original.  To me, and many others who have researched this phenomenon, it can suggest that all space is the same space, and FTL travel is not even needed.  Momentum could be just as much as an illusion as time and space.  For this reason, copies of yourself are not being made in a different location... a different location is simply filling your surroundings in the teleportation.  Here's the excerpt from my book: 

 

Hal Grant sat down. This was all happening way too soon. He could only imagine the anger that Fe'al is feeling. That house was not supposed to go active, much less cause his officers and detectives to verbally convey the countdown. He had to collect his thoughts. He was sure Wallace would report him for his nervous faint and he did not want to be recalled. He enjoyed his life on this planet so much that he was even considering deactivating his bots.

That was not an option anymore. He knew he would be dragged into helping to fix this mess, if it could be fixed at all. Just as that thought crossed his mind, he felt the effects of QADIRA grab him. “Please hold for a moment, you are in recall.” QADIRA said. Her voice echoed in his mind through his bots. For some Nans, Hal being one of them, they could feel QADIRA's sentience when she spoke. In her creation, the builders of the device included a lot of information pertaining to the quantum level of physics. This inadvertently caused them to create a new sentient life form, though they didn't come to understand this for near a millenia.

He suddenly felt a wave of bliss and peace as his brain's gamma waves spiked. In a certain alcove in the neural net of his brain, a set of neurons ceased firing. These neurons were those responsible for separating space, a necessary act for all conscious observers since all space was the same space. Once the neurons stopped, space collapsed upon itself. In the breadth of a few nanoseconds, he watched his office pull itself into a tiny ball as if being vacuumed to that one point.

It then reformed in front of him as an observation station with Fe'ul and Benh standing before him.



#9 camosrun

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 04:56 PM

RSMellette, excellent words.  One just has to ensure that the fiction being palmed doesn't cause the story to become unbelievable.



#10 RSMellette

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 06:35 PM

That would mean you got caught just like a bad magician.

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#11 SnowGlobe

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 01:31 PM

I was going to specifically mention reading Xenocide too, but it's been discussed.




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