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Kindle Scout.


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#1 Faltho

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 08:05 AM

I've been looking into this as a viable option if I end up going the self publishing route. However, I've not found very much information on the entire process -other than a couple of random websites or blogs with personal experiences-. I was curious as to what you all know about Kindle Scout, or if anyone has submitted/had success with this. The main question I really have is, does publishing through Kindle Scout have any major benefits compared to self publishing with say Amazon?

 

Thanks in advance.



#2 authorjanebnight

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 11:13 PM

I had a response but realized it was you Faltho and we have talked about this.
If Amazon chooses to publish you and you are pretty new and inexperienced on publishing end then I think it is a great opportunity.
For myself I have concerns about lower royalties than if you publish with kdp. Also I am not sure what rights Amazon asks for if you are published with them.I am a control freak so I like to decide things like how much to charge and when to expand markets.
I would love to hear how it goes though.

#3 Faltho

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 07:15 AM

I had a response but realized it was you Faltho and we have talked about this.
If Amazon chooses to publish you and you are pretty new and inexperienced on publishing end then I think it is a great opportunity.
For myself I have concerns about lower royalties than if you publish with kdp. Also I am not sure what rights Amazon asks for if you are published with them.I am a control freak so I like to decide things like how much to charge and when to expand markets.
I would love to hear how it goes though.

 

I was curious partially as a possible route later on but also I read an article on an author named Jill Nojack. I had read the first two books of her Fae Unbound series -which I really liked the plot but the writing to me was pretty subpar and it ended up being a bit too predictable- and was curious what else she had written. She was one of those who were selected through the Kindle Scout program, though evidently -at least according to the article-, she had originally only entered as a way of advertising her new series before it came out as a self-published work. It seems like a lot of people have been doing Kindle Scout simply as an exposure sort of gig and never expect to win.

So far what I've gathered from those who have self published before and won either on purpose or accident, they love the amount of effort scout puts into advertising for them. Even with the above concern of less royalties, more sales with less royalties still leads on average to much great net profit for the writer. I have also heard a lot of positive things about the editing team that helps get your novel as flawless as possible before sending it out to the masses. So no more bad reviews from those English geeks who hate that you don't use oxford commas. However, I've also heard a few drawback that would make me take pause. The biggest one is the issue of rights to the work and Amazon's lack of specificity. Most people in the program evidently are not entirely sure where they stand with who owns what for the moment. There is also a lot of concern that this doesn't support physical books -which are luckily coming back into fashion-, and again no one seems to be sure if Amazon owns the rights to these or not. 

 

But I'd still like to hear from some of you who might have some personal experience with Scout.



#4 J. Lea Lopez

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 01:08 AM

I have no experience with Kindle Scout because I don't like the submission and publication agreement. There's a 45 day exclusivity period where you can't sell the work or submit it to other publishers (and if you've been around the query and agent forums much, you might've seen the strong recommendation not to give exclusive reading periods to agents and such because it's not in your best interest to literally stop your forward momentum. Then again, if you're pretty much set on self-publishing anyway, that exclusivity may not be as much of a hindrance.) I can't immediately see anything in their agreement that gives you the option to back out or change your mind during those 45 days. Basically if they accept your work during those 45 days, the publishing terms immediately go into effect. So be sure to read it ahead of time and make sure you're okay with it.

 

A $1,500 advance is not much money. I don't personally know that Amazon's advertising plus that small advance is enough to make me give up a significant chunk of royalties. With Kindle Scount you'll get "royalties on net revenues at a rate of 50% for eBooks, 25% for audio editions and 20% for translations." When you publish directly on Amazon, you get 70% as long as your price is $2.99 or more. You're also locked into the contract for five years (you can get your rights back after two if the previous 12 months' royalties have been less than $500 total).

 

You only have 30 days to make "reasonable revisions" after your work is accepted. And if you don't make any in that time, they can move forward with publishing your work as you originally uploaded, regardless of whether you think it's 100% ready. Basically you better have already paid for a good editor prior to even submitting to Kindle Scout, because Amazon will not be going through edits with you like actual publishing houses will.

 

To me, Kindle Scout is you still doing most of the same work you'd have to do when self-publishing, but then handing the reins over to Amazon at the last minute for them to take a chunk of your royalties in exchange for you getting their stamp of legitimacy.



#5 Faltho

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Posted 16 October 2015 - 06:04 AM

Thanks for that well thought out response, and you've said a lot of the things that I myself was concerned with. I also share the same fear that you seem to be doing all the work and handing over a large portion of your typical profits to someone else simply for the advertising and stamp of approval. However, I was hoping that someone on here would have been a selected person, and would have a better idea if this fear is realistic or if perhaps it was really worth the extra money loss to gain that initial publication and advertising.



#6 J. Lea Lopez

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 04:42 PM

Thanks for that well thought out response, and you've said a lot of the things that I myself was concerned with. I also share the same fear that you seem to be doing all the work and handing over a large portion of your typical profits to someone else simply for the advertising and stamp of approval. However, I was hoping that someone on here would have been a selected person, and would have a better idea if this fear is realistic or if perhaps it was really worth the extra money loss to gain that initial publication and advertising.

Since I'm a never say never kinda gal, I've still been thinking about whether Kindle Scout could be useful as an experiment for me, and so I logged on to Kboards, where I haven't been in months, and found this thread with some info from people who are going through the process and even one who was selected for publication. You might find the info you want there.



#7 Faltho

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Posted 20 November 2015 - 08:30 AM

Since I'm a never say never kinda gal, I've still been thinking about whether Kindle Scout could be useful as an experiment for me, and so I logged on to Kboards, where I haven't been in months, and found this thread with some info from people who are going through the process and even one who was selected for publication. You might find the info you want there.

Thanks for this post. From what I've read it seems like it doesn't do too bad for an author looking to publish their first book and get a little extra push for advertisement. For an established author though, this may not be the best route, due to the only medium sales and lower royalties.  






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