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Cruise Ships


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#1 Pen

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Posted 11 November 2015 - 09:07 PM

I did some research on the numbers provided by the Coast Guard and read a several articles about Cruise Ship safety.

 

I'm wondering though how close are the rooms (state room/cabins) packed how thin are the walls? Could it be possible for someone to hear what was going on in another cabin if those occupants were loud enough? (like throwing a party or shouting)

 

Also interested in personal accounts people can provide. Did you feel safe? Did you feel the boat moving (tilting, pitching, rolling)? What was it like? It was a hotel on water? A giant mall? What could a person do on a cruise? What did you do on a cruise?

 

Thank you.



#2 Jeanne

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 10:58 AM

We went on the Inland Passage cruise to Alaska a few years ago with Royal Carribean Cruise Lines. Things have changed since then somewhat, as the cruise ships are largeer and more opulent, but I can answer some of your questions.

 

A cruise ship is pretty much like a floating hotel when it comes to staterooms and cabins. There are multiple levels and different tiers of luxury. Inside cabins are basic rooms with no porthole or view. Outside cabins have a porthole and view, and the more luxurious cabins may have balconies. The hallways to the cabins are interior and often narrow, just wide enough for two people to pass or to move a maid's cart. Because the cabins are on multiple levels, people tend to use stairs or elevators to access the hallways to their rooms.

 

The cabins are right next to each other, but the walls aren't particularly thin. However, if there was a loud party or if someone was shouting, you'd probably hear it.

 

Every cruise ship is required to have at least one safety drill at the beginning of the cruise, and all passengers are required to attend. Pursers will find you if don't show up.

 

The ship has a gentle roll most of the time, but not enough that feel unsteady on your feet. It's more a sense of slow motion that you adjust to quickly. In the lower levels you can sometimes feel the hum of the engines. We had a storm one night, and the ship was definitely rolling then. In fact, one of our kids felt seasick from the motion.

 

Most cruises alternate between onboard activities and excursions at ports of call. Large cruise ships have lots and lots of onboard activities, including casinos, stage shows, clubs, shopping malls, swimming pools, water slides, rock climbing, workouts, special interest classes, lectures, etc. My advice would be to look at the websites of some of the major cruise lines, as they often feature shipboard activities. The stage show productions we attended onboard were very professionally done.

 

Excursions are priced separately from the cruise and can include all sorts of short trips. We went on hikes, went shopping, took a train trip, and took a tour during our excursions. The excursions depend on the location of the ports of call. For example, in Alaska, the excursions feature the natural wonders and the history. A Caribbean cruise would offer different excursions, such as trips to beaches, scuba diving, or parasailing.

 

Hope that helps a little.

 

Jeanne

 

 



#3 Pen

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 05:45 PM

It helped out a lot! Thank you!



#4 Sassalota

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:19 PM

I have been on a couple different ships. I even was on the Carnival Conquest ship in the gulf of Mexico on a Caribbean tour during hurricane Ida! I did not feel safe them :) The windows on the top deck shattered. Water was everywhere. They had to close the deck. You would be standing in one spot and all the sudden you were tossed 4 feet in the opposite direction. When I was laying in bed, the ship would hit a wave and I would bounce off the bed!

 

We could hear what was going on in the cabins directly next to us. I think it depends where your cabin is. If you are close to the engine house, you will hear that all the time and it is so loud so you would not be able to hear any voices. Of you are further from the engine house, it is a little quieter so you can hear loud voices. The cabins feel like a cheap camper...the way the walls are anyway.

 

Yeah it is like a huge hotel. The main lido deck always had a buffet so you can eat all the time but there was other dining rooms and restaurants. There was shopping (everything is way cheaper on the boat!) Well when you buy it in the stores it is cheaper. You can buy booze for like 1/3 of the price you can in the US but the ship only lets you keep 2 bottles in your cabin. They "hold" any extra you buy for when you get back. They want you to buy their drinks which a daily special ran about $7 or 6.95 or something like that.

 

You get a card with your cabin number and your name and you credit card info on it and that is what you use to get on and off the boat (they scan it) and it is the key to your room and you use it for all your shopping while you on the boat. The bars do take cash though.

 

They have photographers set up all over the boat with little "scenes" and you can take pictures and then they always set all the pictures out on the deck and you can buy them or order special prints.

Some of the dinners have themes where you have do dress in formal attire to be allowed in the dining room.

 

There are casinos, clubs, library, kids clubs, candy shops, water slides, mini golf, basketball courts, spa, gyms,..it really depends on the boat. You can go online and see the deck layouts. They have comedy clubs and theater.

 

When you get to your destination you can to get off the boat and you can either do a cruise sponsored shore excursion or go out on your own. The excursions are pricey. I went on a zip line in Montego Bay and that was maybe $100. I hated Jamaica. Every where they go they ask for money. They stole my niece and started branding her hair (without asking permission) and then the lady demanded money.  We went to the Mayan ruins in Progresso (that was a rip off) and a private beach. We drove these 1970 Volkswagen dune buggies and ours broke twice leaving us stranded in 110 degree heat in the middle of drug cartel areas. We did a dolphin swim in Cozumel and I got a virus from the dolphin named lui.....We went scuba diving and kayaking in Grand Cayman and that was the best. If you have money you can do whatever.

 

The service on the boat is awesome. They would sneak into your room when you are out at night and make "down" your bed with mints and fresh towels that they make into animal sculptures.

 

They do the muster drill at the beginning and everyone has to practice putting on your vest and getting to your life boat.



#5 Pen

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 06:04 PM

 

leaving us stranded in 110 degree heat in the middle of drug cartel areas

 

 

First of all. Thank you for providing your account.

 

Second of all my ADD kicked when I read that line in your account. My thought ...

 

Spoiler

 

....



#6 Sassalota

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 08:10 PM

Yeah it could work.  The funny thing is the caravan of dune buggies was arranged and we were escorted on a bus  to where we found our buggie. On the bus they introduced "the mechanic" who was going to drive with us. We should have been tipped off....who brings a mechanic on a tour?  So, he was suppose to drive at the end of the caravan and if anyone had problems he would stop and fix them. Our buggie broke and he stopped to fix it. He radio'd ahead to tell the caravan to stop and wait. He couldn't fix it so he switched buggies with us and told the caravan we were on our way. We met up to the caravan and they took off but then our buggie broke again!  The mechanic was like 10 miles behind us. It was scary because the cruise ship is only docked for like 8 hours. No one brought their cell phone with because it was international rates....The cruise ship uses those ID card to see if everyone is on ship but if you don't come back. Since the tour was arranged through carival, I think they would have had to wait for us or pay for us to fly to the next stop but that is assuming we made it safely somewhere.

 

You think that is scary....When we were in Montego Bay we heard stories about the week before, some "taxi driver" took some tourists into the jungle and left them there....never found them.

 

I could give you more details :)



#7 Pen

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 01:07 PM

More detail you should make that book or something don't you think?

 

My thing is I have crazy freaking dreams that seem so real ... but they are just bits and pieces. I have to fill in the gaps. When I researched Cruise Ship's and saw that one people going missing happen regularly and that two not all of those numbers are required to be reported. I thought a cruise would be perfect! I mean my MC is could disappear without a trace. No one would know and no one would care.



#8 Sassalota

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 02:44 PM

You go for it!  I don't need another writing project. I have the memories of that trip and that is enough.



#9 Pen

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 05:04 PM

I understand that. People told me that I should write a memoir. I laughed (I'm not important enough to write one) and besides who'd want to read about the time got pimp slapped by a gust of wind... or a micro tornado (I don't know what it was really, but it hurt!)



#10 iainburnett

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 01:57 PM

You can definitely hear people, and the higher up you are, the more you feel the motion of the ocean...

 

For disappearing without a trace, a lot of these excursions give that opportunity. I took a cruise in the Mediterranean and one of our 'shore' excursions was a trip out to the island of Rhodes (if you're a GoT fan, the inspiration for Braavos). Even though its a different country from where the main ship was docked (in Turkey), they didn't give us our passports for the day trip out there (and everyone just gets to wander around on their own). One couple forgot or missed the ferry departure time, so all 400 of us waited for 90 minutes until the couple strolled back in. In a case like this, if the crew didn't do an accurate job of counting passengers and we left, that couple would have been screwed (stuck without identification on a foreign island).


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#11 DocScurlock

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 12:05 PM

One thing I noticed when I was on several cruises is that invariably there is a person or persons who I would see sitting in a lounge chair by the pool early in the day with a cocktail. (As in 8-9 in the AM) and they would never really move. The servers would bring therm drinks and they would sip all day. Never anything else.

Also there always seemed a crowd that lived to eat at the free buffets. Around the world in 12 meals a day.

The walks in cabins are pretty thick. But I imagine if one was noisy enough the neighbors might hear. (Of course walking by and seeing a couple on their balcony mid-coitus was quite amusing as well.




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