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Tokyo night


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#1 Akiko

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 12:37 PM

What do you think about my synopsis? Please consider that it's a translation from Italian, so, if you notice grammar errors, it's my fault... please tell me!

"A trip through the night of Tokyo, seen through the main metro stations, each of which incorporates a fragment of a past life.
Keiko, a designer at the threshold of thirty years, brings back memories of his mother through her own creations, inspired by her paintings.
The vivid flashbacks of an unusual and charming boy, in a constant struggle to find his identity, accompany the daily life of the protagonist, who can this way overcome its abandonment.
In the most unexpected places and times, a mysterious Italian ambassador appears and disappears like a ghost.
Finally, a normal guy, at the same time the one that will mark the fate of all existences around him, finally prevailing among everyone.
A generation of disenchanted young people, lost in the uncertain present, who lives as he tries to remember his way around the world.
The grief for the loss of loved ones, their remoteness or their absence, remains in the background during the whole story.
The human relationships that are interwoven in the busiest districts of the city slip away slowly, as fragile as the blossom petals in the cherry season."


Tokyo Night is a novel taking place in the metropolis of Tokyo, in the Japanese postmodern era. The titles of the chapters go through the main stations of the subway, that are the meeting point for young people in the capital, the equivalent of squares in European culture.
The novel was written from the perspective of a Japanese girl between the ages of twenty and thirty years, Keiko, not only with regard to the plot and the content, but considering also the linguistic style: the intention is to make it look like a translation from a Japanese text. As an orientalist, the author has used phrases and images typical of Japanese culture, inspired by modern and contemporary authors such as Banana Yoshimoto, Haruki Murakami, Natsu Kirino and Yasunari Kawabata. For this reason, explanatory footnotes of points that could be hard to understand for a novice reader of the Japanese culture were added, such as traditional festivals, celebrities, food, historical events.
The plot takes place on several levels. While in one hand the protagonist goes on a path of personal growth with the two men most important to her before taking a final decision, on the other hand she lives in a present filtered through the memories of people who are no longer part of her life; both because they disappeared (the mother, the unborn child) or because they moved away (Masayuki, her ex-boyfriend, the father).
Furthermore, the beloved ones live again through the artistic creations used for her work. Her paintings, in fact, inspired by the essays of the mother, are the starting point for the creation of a collection of luxury accessories.
In addition to the descriptions of places and Japanese society, in the novel there are also deep differences with Italy (in fact one of the protagonists is Italian), a detail which may interests the public of both countries. In fact, the audience for this book is targeted, those who read manga, watch anime, practice martial arts or are interested in Japanese philosophy, and of course all those who are studying the language, but it can also be appreciated by those who lack of any specific knowledge.
Chiara
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#2 Dayspring

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 09:36 AM

Hi Akiko! This sounds like an interesting premise for a book, and I like the idea of getting all that Japanese atmosphere. However, the first summary in particular sounds more like a query than a synopsis. When writing a synopsis you should leave out most of the description of your style, and just write a summary of the plot as it happens. Characters' names are in capital letters, with a brief description of the person. For instance: 'KEIKO, a 29-year-old designer, gets on the Tokyo subway early one spring evening. Though she is busy thinking about her recently deceased mother, she can't help tuning into a few words of Italian spoken by a dignified-looking gentleman nearby.' I don't know if that's what happens, but you get the idea!

Finally, is Keiko a boy or a girl? The two summaries you wrote above seem to contradict each other.

Day

#3 Akiko

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:11 AM

Hi Akiko! This sounds like an interesting premise for a book, and I like the idea of getting all that Japanese atmosphere. However, the first summary in particular sounds more like a query than a synopsis. When writing a synopsis you should leave out most of the description of your style, and just write a summary of the plot as it happens. Characters' names are in capital letters, with a brief description of the person. For instance: 'KEIKO, a 29-year-old designer, gets on the Tokyo subway early one spring evening. Though she is busy thinking about her recently deceased mother, she can't help tuning into a few words of Italian spoken by a dignified-looking gentleman nearby.' I don't know if that's what happens, but you get the idea!

Finally, is Keiko a boy or a girl? The two summaries you wrote above seem to contradict each other.

Day

Thanks a lot! You are right, I should put the events clearly in the synopsis...
Chiara
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