Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

Book pricing


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Sassalota

Sassalota

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self Published Novel, Ruby in the Water under the pen name J.P. Sterling.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 01:16 PM

Anyone have a method to their book pricing? I read something like 2.5 times the price of production, but I don't want to go that high.

 

I have a 255 page woman's fiction book. For soft covers I am seeing a range of like $9.99-$14.99 and for hard covers (those are so expensive!), I wanted to mark it like $16, but I don't think I can go that low. When I look at other books in my genre they look to be around 20 and higher.

 

 



#2 mwsinclair

mwsinclair

    Elephant with a trunk full of novels

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,546 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented, media
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Journalist covering U.S. nonprofits, foundations, and life in general. President and Chief Elephant Officer of Elephant's Bookshelf Press, LLC. Since establishing the company in 2012, we have published ten books, including short stories by several AQC writers and debut novels by AQC authors A.T. O'Connor (aka Cat Woods), "ScubaSteve" Carman, and R.S. Mellette. Heading into 2016, we're aiming to publish at least two books, including the second Mellette novel and an anthology. In 2015, I saw a few memoir/nonfiction pieces published in Red Fez. I expect to do more of that in 2016 and beyond, while also looking to add freelance editing and writing clients.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 04:28 PM

I take a different approach. I publish only ebooks and paperbacks, but I feel we're not competing against the big publishers but rather the smaller ones. I tend to price novels between $4.99 (ebook) and $9.99 (paperback) depending on page count, distribution costs, etc. I'd rather not top $10 because I think readers coming to new authors (which is primarily what EBP publishes) aren't too crazy about plunking down that much on an author they don't really know yet.

 

As I said about a friend who went the hardcover route and was charging $17.99 per copy, "When's the last time you paid eighteen bucks on an author you'd never heard of?" She didn't do too well with her sales.



#3 Sassalota

Sassalota

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self Published Novel, Ruby in the Water under the pen name J.P. Sterling.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 06:41 PM

So, how can you charge less than $10? When I do the price calculator for ingramsparks, my break even price is just under $12.  There are lots of authors who have longer books for less than $10 and I don't understand how they got it so cheap? I would love to do a 9.95 price?



#4 KitCampbell

KitCampbell

    Occasionally considering octopus husbandry

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 186 posts
  • Literary Status:published, self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Three novels published through Turtleduck Press, short stories all over the place. Readying to dip my toes back into the agent search pool.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 06:59 PM

A lot of it depends on your distribution model. If you're doing Print on Demand (like Createspace or Lulu) they'll have a minimum price based on the size of the book. If you're doing batch printing you can drive costs down based on the number of units you have printed.

 

If you are doing PoD, it's hard to go under $10 if your book is more than about 65K words, I've found. I'm not sure what model EBP above is using, so maybe they'll have additional information that will help.



#5 Sassalota

Sassalota

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self Published Novel, Ruby in the Water under the pen name J.P. Sterling.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 07:06 PM

So, if my break even point is about $12, what would be a good price? I was thinking 14.95, but that seems so high for a paperback, but I do see some that are more.



#6 Blueberry Tide

Blueberry Tide

    Burnt Coffee Bean

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 376 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self-Published

Posted 28 November 2016 - 07:24 PM

Look at the other books in your genre and see what they're average price is. I published through CreateSpace. While doing the uploading process, it will tell you the minimum price the book can be. Mine was seven something, and I priced the softback at $9.50. My genre is urban/contemporary fantasy, and most softback options were in the 8-9 range. 

 

It depends on how much it costs to print the book, and who you publish through. If you're self-publishing, DO YOUR RESEARCH on the company you choose. Some ask for more than others; quality varies; and see what all they are doing for you. I ended up going with CreateSpace because they asked no for money up front, just a percentage of each sale. Before I went with them, I was looking at Mill City Press, and the whole thing was going to cost me around five thousand dollars. I didn't expect to make that money back, so I didn't go with them. 



#7 Sassalota

Sassalota

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self Published Novel, Ruby in the Water under the pen name J.P. Sterling.

Posted 28 November 2016 - 08:35 PM

I am doing the KDP exclusive for 90 days so I can launch and then I will upload into ingramsparks for my print books.  It's so confusing. I have read it's better to buffer the price up a little so you can offer discounts because it's gives people a little more incentive to buy when it looks like it's on sale.



#8 Tom Preece

Tom Preece

    Word Warrior

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,024 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Northwest
  • Publishing Experience:Virtually none. Long long ago in college I was published in a couple of student magazines

Posted 29 November 2016 - 01:18 AM

I read this thread with some dread.  Most of you hope for some acknowledgement through profit.  All I want is to be read and shared.  It's not the same problem.



#9 Sassalota

Sassalota

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self Published Novel, Ruby in the Water under the pen name J.P. Sterling.

Posted 29 November 2016 - 09:52 AM

I agree Tom. I do think having my work shared is the main goal.



#10 mwsinclair

mwsinclair

    Elephant with a trunk full of novels

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,546 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented, media
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Journalist covering U.S. nonprofits, foundations, and life in general. President and Chief Elephant Officer of Elephant's Bookshelf Press, LLC. Since establishing the company in 2012, we have published ten books, including short stories by several AQC writers and debut novels by AQC authors A.T. O'Connor (aka Cat Woods), "ScubaSteve" Carman, and R.S. Mellette. Heading into 2016, we're aiming to publish at least two books, including the second Mellette novel and an anthology. In 2015, I saw a few memoir/nonfiction pieces published in Red Fez. I expect to do more of that in 2016 and beyond, while also looking to add freelance editing and writing clients.

Posted 29 November 2016 - 12:50 PM

I use CreateSpace, and as Blueberry said, they show the minimum price you can sell a book at. There are several paperbacks that I only make about 50 cents per copy. That isn't really enough to make back the costs of the cover, for example, unless a lot of books are sold. It's one reason why I've done a lot of anthologies, which I can price cheaper, but because they have fewer pages I'm still able to cut off some of the losses from the other books. Still, anthologies are a very hard sell, so this isn't a long-term solution. 

 

I'm aiming to diversify revenue streams in 2017 and 2018 with some new product types (and probably some ebook-only versions, since paperbacks have been hard to make money back on). 

 

To Tom's point, I'm not looking for a huge profit. My goal is primarily to not lose significant money on book releases; if I can make a profit, that's nice, but I don't really expect it. Of course, if this were my only source of income, that's untenable. The main goal of EBP is to help talented writers build and develop an audience. It's very much a labor of love.



#11 Blueberry Tide

Blueberry Tide

    Burnt Coffee Bean

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 376 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:Self-Published

Posted 29 November 2016 - 07:12 PM

I agree; a profit is nice, but it's not the main goal. Writing is a hobby. While I'd love to make it into a career, that's more of a dream-goal. Most writers still work a normal job. By 'normal' I mean steady paycheck. I want people to read and enjoy what I write most of all. I don't write to blow minds or shatter glass ceilings. I write for the same reason I read: to escape, to enjoy, to be someone else for a little while. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users