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#1 Linden307

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:36 AM

Can anyone confirm that Russian children/young adults would call their grandmothers "Baba (Name)" like "Baba Nadia" or "Baba Yana" and something like "Babulya" as a very cutesy affectionate name? That's what I was told by a Russian native but it would be good to get a second opinion just in case. Also, what would a young woman/teenager call a woman of grandmotherly age with whom she is very familiar but who is not a blood relative? What I've read online suggests that something like "Tyotya Yana" might work?



#2 dinosaurinhats

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 03:17 PM

For your first question, Baba is correct and common. For your second question, depending on the geography of your novel and what time period, it used to be common for young women to call other women (affectionately) babushka before their name. That has changed though, so it depends on what time period you're writing in. 

Hope this helps! 



#3 EmmaWest

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 11:10 PM

Probably way too late to be of any help, but yes, your source was correct on all three counts - Baba and Babulya and Babushka all are used. And Tyotya means aunt, so yes, everyone just basically calls older women aunties like that, even if you're not related to them. If you want to say something like 'broad', as in 'a broad in a green coat crossed the road', you can say 'tyotka'. Less personal, but means 'older, somewhat common, woman'. 







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