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Preschool Discipline


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#1 Aightball

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 10:39 PM

I wasn't sure what to call this.

Scenario: small town, rural Iowa school. 4-year-old preschool and one student has two dads. Year is 2015. A couple students say unkind things learned at home (religious stuff like being gay isn't Christian, etc). How would the teachers deal with this?

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#2 mwsinclair

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 11:36 AM

I think it depends on the teacher. If it escalates beyond the classroom, then obviously the principal and possibly the school district play a role. As much as I'd like to believe pre-schoolers wouldn't engage in this type of behavior (because, when you're 4, you don't really worry about such things -- but by ages 6-8, perhaps it's begun), but if it's vital to your story, I think the character of the teacher will mean everything to that interaction.



#3 Thrash

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:08 PM

In rural Iowa, a lot of the pre-schools for that age will be church based. As mwsinclair said, it would really depend on the teacher, but also on the attitudes of the pre-school. I'm assuming the Dads wouldn't enroll a kid in a preschool affiliated with an anti-gay church unless there were few other options (which is possible in that part of the country).  The teacher would probably separate the children involved, requiring them to do separate activities on opposite sides of the room. An incident report would be filled out and sent to each parent---and most teachers I know would try to be as direct and matter-of-fact about this letter as possible. "Kid X said blah blah and Kid Y reacted by blah blah." The teacher would probably not suggest any at-home punishment, and would keep the children separated as much as possible. If it continued or escalated to anything physical, the students might be put in different classrooms if the school was big enough, or if not, a parent-teacher conference would be called, possibly including the principal. It would be a very delicate situation and the teacher would probably walk on egg shells unless there was a clear zero-tolerance policy on that kind of bullying. 



#4 lionspaws

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:30 PM

As an early elementary teacher, I would handle this by saying, "Kids, those are things we don't talk about in school because people have different opinions, but you can talk about them at home with your parents." Also, it may not necessarily be bullying if children (especially that young) are just repeating things they've heard, or are trying to process all the conflicting worldviews they're getting exposed to. I probably would not contact parents unless the behavior continued or produced a drastic reaction, implying the child might go home very upset. If this did happen, I would protect the confidentiality of the other children involved and might say to the parents, "Another child made some comments about gay parents, and I addressed this in the class..." 

 

Also, with children as young as preschool, it is very easy to divert their attention; bullying really wouldn't be that common and if handled appropriately (not overreacting) it's pretty likely the kids would forget about it shortly and move on. 


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#5 Aightball

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:07 PM

Thanks guys!

 

I was debating if kids this age would even say that or notice things like that (my oldest niece was super observant early on, her younger sister not as much) and then repeat what their parents say.  Prior to this scene, I wrote out the open house and a parent said something negative about the dads, so was debating if the kids would remember that and say something.  I'll write this out based on these suggestions and see if it works =)


Most girls are made of
sugar and spice and everything nice; they
screwed up the recipe for me: I'm made of
bat wings and broken things.

Query: http://agentquerycon...rescue-me-lgbt/

Blog: http://aightball.wordpress.com

Synopsis: http://agentquerycon...rescue-me-lgbt/

Twitter Hook(s): http://agentquerycon...rescue-me-lgbt/

Short Story "Anguish", in Winter's Regret: http://www.amazon.co...winter's regret

aertja.jpg


#6 Thrash

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 11:48 PM

secondstar is absolutely right about diversion and not over-reacting. Some schools are more intense about incident reports than others, and considering fiction I was imagining this a bit more intense than typical for the age. 



#7 bigblackcat97

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 10:52 AM

Thanks guys!

 

I was debating if kids this age would even say that or notice things like that (my oldest niece was super observant early on, her younger sister not as much) and then repeat what their parents say.  Prior to this scene, I wrote out the open house and a parent said something negative about the dads, so was debating if the kids would remember that and say something.  I'll write this out based on these suggestions and see if it works =)

 

I absolutely think the kids would say something, but more than likely not out of their own malice but in repetition. I remember this old commercial from the 80s... something about a wedding where a little kid walked up to the bride and gave her this huge smile and said, "My mom said she can't believe you wore white."


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#8 mwsinclair

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 07:49 AM

HA! I'd forgotten that commercial.






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