Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

querying multiple manuscripts questions

Fiction Fantasy Science Fiction Young Adult

  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 TheJaded

TheJaded

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, emerging
  • LocationUS Southwest

Posted 13 July 2017 - 07:21 PM

.



#2 Springfield

Springfield

    Find me at properediting.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 463 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 15 July 2017 - 12:08 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I have been writing for some time (20 years-ish) and have multiple manuscripts that I consider to be ready, or nearly ready, to begin querying. In fact, there are 5 completed manuscripts that I have polished to the point that they are potentially ready to begin the querying process. I do not think specifically that any of the 5 has any more advantage to get accepted over the others, they seem like equals in this regard. So now I have several questions.

 

Question # 1:

Before I ever found this place I sent off six queries to the first of the books on my list (and I'm in my fourth week of waiting now...) 

I know it's not a good idea to potentially query all of them at the same time, or even two, as it could become complex, etc. However, let's say the first book gets no positive response. Let's then say that I decide I'd rather query the second one. Would it be bad to query the 6 agents I already queried with book 1, with book 2 (assuming they could potentially be a good fit), or should I find different agents?

 

Yes, that's a bad idea. Find other agents or wait to see what happens with the first book. You can query the same agents with the second book if they reject the first, AFTER a decent waiting period, like six months.

 

Question # 2:

Does it really take a year to publish a book, assuming they've been accepted for representation, etc., or longer? 5 years is going to kill me..., and by the time those 5 are potentially through the process I'll have potentially 20 others ready to start the process. They're getting nearly ready now. If I ever get all of my stories written it will be something like 80 stories. And new ones surface all the time. Is there ANY WAY I could, if they were worthy (of course), ever get 80 manuscripts published in a lifetime?

 

Yeah, a year would be a very short timeline -- very short. It'd likely be 18 months -2 years or more. You're presuming a lot of things here, first, that everything you write is fit to be published, which isn't generally true for anyone. Second, the timeline for a first book isn't the same for subsequent titles from the same publisher, that can be like a year turnaround. Third, that you'll keep going at the same pace, and never do anything else, and etc., for decades, which seems... short-sighted. You're putting the cart before the horse. 

 

Question # 3:

Let's say that an individual has these three books. (some of my nearly-ready books vary ... greatly...)

1 ~ a YA fantasy 

2 ~ a picture book for young children that they illustrated themselves and yes, the individual IS an artist.

3 ~ a spiritual story for a very specific audience that they intend to query a specific publishing house (and only that one at this point)

 

Would it be improper etiquette to query agents for the YA fantasy, and different agents for the picture book at the same time, and simultaneously send the last on the list to the publishing house in question? The third is fine, presuming that house wouldn't be a fit for the other two things. The first two is iffier, because what if you get agent overlap -- agents that rep one or the other but work at the same agency that you want to query, or you get one who bites but only reps pbs, so you sign, and give her right of first refusal, go looking for a second agent with her blessing, and find one who wants the fantasy and DOES rep pbs and wants that too. Now what do you do? Just do one thing at a time. Query one thing and see where it gets you.

z



#3 Litgal

Litgal

    Veteran Queen Bee -- Moderator "Here Be Historicals"

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,485 posts
  • Literary Status:published, agented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:My debut novel, "The Sister Queens," (March 2012/NAL), was set in 13th century France and England and wove the captivating story of sisters, Marguerite and Eleanor of Provence, who both became queens. My next solo novel, "Medicis Daughter," (Dec 1 2015/Thomas Dunne) traveled forward three-hundred years to the intrigue-riven French Valois court, spinning the tale of beautiful princess Marguerite who walks the knife edge between the demands of her serpentine mother, Catherine de Medicis, and those of her own conscience.

    In between I became a "hybrid" as part of a group of six authors involved in a high concept novel-in-six-parts called "A Day of Fire" which released in November of 2014. The book, "A Day of Fire," tells the story of the final days of the doomed city of Pompeii in a way you've never read it before.

Posted 15 July 2017 - 03:14 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I have been writing for some time (20 years-ish) and have multiple manuscripts that I consider to be ready, or nearly ready, to begin querying. In fact, there are 5 completed manuscripts that I have polished to the point that they are potentially ready to begin the querying process. I do not think specifically that any of the 5 has any more advantage to get accepted over the others, they seem like equals in this regard. So now I have several questions.

 

Question # 1:

Before I ever found this place I sent off six queries to the first of the books on my list (and I'm in my fourth week of waiting now...) 

I know it's not a good idea to potentially query all of them at the same time, or even two, as it could become complex, etc. However, let's say the first book gets no positive response. Let's then say that I decide I'd rather query the second one. Would it be bad to query the 6 agents I already queried with book 1, with book 2 (assuming they could potentially be a good fit), or should I find different agents? The answer to this rather largely depends on whether everything you are writing is the same genre. IF it is than which one you query first doesn't matter so much. IF THEY ARE NOT pick the genre you are most interested in continuing with because THIS I can tell you for CERTAIN--once you sell a book in a given genre your agent and your publisher will expect more of the same until you are established. So don't sell a cozy mystery if you have your heart set on mostly writing epic fantasy. 

 

Question # 2:

Does it really take a year to publish a book, assuming they've been accepted for representation, etc., or longer? 5 years is going to kill me..., and by the time those 5 are potentially through the process I'll have potentially 20 others ready to start the process. They're getting nearly ready now. If I ever get all of my stories written it will be something like 80 stories. And new ones surface all the time. Is there ANY WAY I could, if they were worthy (of course), ever get 80 manuscripts published in a lifetime? Lets start with some basics--finding an agent is not quick (remember only 2% of those looking get them). Then submissions process is not speedy and only 50% of first agented novels sell. But once you sign a contract with a major publisher the time from inking that to "book on shelf of store" is 12-24 months, depending (remember you are not the only title/author and many things are already on the publishing schedule at the time you are acquired). Then whether or not your publisher will put out your next book--not a given--depends on whether you have a multi-book contract or they have an option. Not every book you've written will necessarily be published--most published authors have a trunked novel or two. 

 

Question # 3:

Let's say that an individual has these three books. (some of my nearly-ready books vary ... greatly...)

1 ~ a YA fantasy 

2 ~ a picture book for young children that they illustrated themselves and yes, the individual IS an artist.

3 ~ a spiritual story for a very specific audience that they intend to query a specific publishing house (and only that one at this point)

 

Would it be improper etiquette to query agents for the YA fantasy, and different agents for the picture book at the same time, and simultaneously send the last on the list to the publishing house in question? See my answer to question one. What exactly do you want to do next because if you sell a YA fantasy then you will be asked for another one of those for example. 


Lit. (aka Sophie Perinot)





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Fiction, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Young Adult

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users