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Shallow World: A Sunny-Thorned Seed for the Untold Stories (New Adult romantic dramedy)

Chick Lit New Adult Romance Womens Fiction Offbeat/Quirky

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#21 Springfield

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 10:28 PM

It's not just printing cost. There are conventions. Agents aren't particularly interested in novellas either, because there's not a big market for them.

 

However, the biggest problem with manuscripts that are super long isn't the worry that publishers won't want to pay to print them; it's that they almost inevitably need heavy editing. On occasion, a long wc is really justified, but it's really rare. 



#22 Iconian

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 12:13 AM

Some months back I did a little bit of research, to get an idea of what kind of books are already out there that might be similar to Shallow, and how it might measure up.  I suppose you could try to compare it to different things, but the one that stuck out in my mind was Twilight.  At the time Shallow was very close to 119,000 words, which is the approximate word count for Shallow.  It's an interesting little story that read to the publication of Twilight--a lot of it was luck.  I admit that my word count is probably a little high compared to what publishers typically desire.  But I think Twilight--a first time publication--and books like it prove that you don't absolutely have to have the "right" word count to be accepted.  The really scary thing I think is that Twilight only ended up getting accepted in the first place because apparently one agent Stephanie Meyer sent the request to basically made a mistake--not realizing that 130,000 words was a lot when Meyer told her.

 

Now, perhaps I will encounter an agent who will outright reject my query because it doesn't have a word count.  Perhaps--but I'd rather take my chances with that than with telling them it's 121,000 words, when such a number is considered "too high."  The more I think about it, the more I think I just have a better chance not even bothering to mention it.  I think the really decision ought to lie with the strength of the writing--NOT how many words I've put down.  And I personally believe the manuscript is quite strong.

 

But on that note: Springfield, you asked about who I've given my ms to.  So far, just my sister and dad.  Unfortunately, I don't think it's the sort of thing that either of them really read.  I do think I should try to get some other eyes on the book if possible.  Do you have any suggestions for sites or anything where they do that?  Maybe something like this site, but for book critiques?

 

Finally . . . I admit I'm beginning to wonder if I should reduce my blurb about my copywriting job, as several have suggested.  The jury's out, but for now I still like it . . .

 

 

 

 

 

Anyway, here is the latest version of my query.  I've changed it around a lot, and I think it's quite a bit stronger than the previous version.

 

 

 

 

Dear ____

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, California college, they start to get pulled in opposing directions. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever.

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted. While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid.

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal to break Katy free, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly. All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon. And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths.

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.


My query, open to critiques:   http://agentquerycon...mantic-dramedy/


#23 Springfield

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 12:46 AM

Some months back I did a little bit of research, to get an idea of what kind of books are already out there that might be similar to Shallow, and how it might measure up.  I suppose you could try to compare it to different things, but the one that stuck out in my mind was Twilight.  At the time Shallow was very close to 119,000 words, which is the approximate word count for Shallow.  It's an interesting little story that read to the publication of Twilight--a lot of it was luck.  I admit that my word count is probably a little high compared to what publishers typically desire.  But I think Twilight--a first time publication--and books like it prove that you don't absolutely have to have the "right" word count to be accepted.  The really scary thing I think is that Twilight only ended up getting accepted in the first place because apparently one agent Stephanie Meyer sent the request to basically made a mistake--not realizing that 130,000 words was a lot when Meyer told her.

 

I refuse to believe a working agent did that. An intern maybe, but an agent? No. You know not to use Twilight as a comp, right? 

 

The problem with finding that one (godawful) book that happens to break the rules and be successful and holding it up as an example of why it's ok to break the rules is that you know about it because it's the rare case that it works out. Like fifteen years ago, someone bought an overlong (terrible) book about sparkly vampires. That does not mean that today, *a  decade and a half later* yours will be fine. Anything is possible, but why not give yourself the best chance? 

 

Also, Twilight is YA. You're pitching an NA, which is barely hanging on as a category as it is. It's not as if there's a big NA market. It's just reducing your chances.

 

 

Now, perhaps I will encounter an agent who will outright reject my query because it doesn't have a word count.  Perhaps--but I'd rather take my chances with that than with telling them it's 121,000 words, when such a number is considered "too high."  The more I think about it, the more I think I just have a better chance not even bothering to mention it.  I think the really decision ought to lie with the strength of the writing--NOT how many words I've put down.  And I personally believe the manuscript is quite strong.

 

Like I said, it's possible, but not likely. There are so few things that justify that length outside of fantasy. I'd bet a decent sum of money it just needs editing. The decision does lie with the writing -- agents have seen a lot of stuff, and they're well aware of the odds of something 50% longer than the standard for the type of book it is doesn't need a weed whacker.

 

But on that note: Springfield, you asked about who I've given my ms to.  So far, just my sister and dad.  Unfortunately, I don't think it's the sort of thing that either of them really read.  I do think I should try to get some other eyes on the book if possible.  Do you have any suggestions for sites or anything where they do that?  Maybe something like this site, but for book critiques?

 

I'm sire there are some, but don't know offhand, sorry. Yes, though, you definitely should get other people to look at it. Did you post even the first 250 here?

 

Finally . . . I admit I'm beginning to wonder if I should reduce my blurb about my copywriting job, as several have suggested.  The jury's out, but for now I still like it . . .

 

See, this is one of the ways you know the book needs editing. :)

 

 

Anyway, here is the latest version of my query.  I've changed it around a lot, and I think it's quite a bit stronger than the previous version.

 

 

 

 

Dear ____

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, California college,Why dont you just say their college? they start to get pulled in opposing directions. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever. You set this up better, but then don't follow through. You say when the shooting occurs, they're pulled in different directions, but then just go on to talk about their boyfriends. 

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted. Nothing was taken for granted in the previous graph? While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid. Like?

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal to break Katy free, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly. Huh? All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon. And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths. This just fizzles out. I still don't see a problem or stakes. This is just a series of events. What is the actual plot?

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.



#24 dogsbody

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 02:10 AM

 The really scary thing I think is that Twilight only ended up getting accepted in the first place because apparently one agent Stephanie Meyer sent the request to basically made a mistake--not realizing that 130,000 words was a lot when Meyer told her.

 

Okay, that's not true, because Meyer's then-agent (I don't know if she's changed since) is a real veteran in the business. And the fact she was able to anticipate Twilight's success when no one else did (she advised Meyer to send back the first offer from a publisher, saying she could "do better") proves her savvy.

 

As for the wordcount: I think people on this forum are exaggerating. Not a lot! But a bit. Back in May of this year Janet Reid, aka Query Shark herself, requested a manuscript that clocked at 176,000 words. She wrote: "Never let anyone tell you that [wordcount] is a deal breaker. It may be to some (lesser) agents, but here at The Reef we sneer at such things. I'd rather pare something down than not have enough story." And she's not the only agent I've seen say something to that effect. 

 

So I really urge you to include it, especially as I've also seen more than a few agents say no wordcount is an auto-reject. (They know why. You're not the first to come up with that trick.) And sure, anticipate some rejections on wordcount as well. But you'll be rejected for any number of things, because agents are looking for reasons they wouldn't be jazzed about your story on a personal level. And if longer stories are something they find, personally, so strongly off-putting, then you don't want them for an agent anyway. Be honest about what you're selling and find the agents who wants to rep exactly that.

 

(Just remember to round up or down the the nearest thousand; it scans better.) 



#25 ThatDan

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 02:41 AM

http://www.writersdi...definitive-post

 

A good bit of reading about word counts, just fyi.



#26 Iconian

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 02:43 AM

First, just to set the record straight, this is from http://stepheniemeye...ting-published/

 

 

My big break came in the form of an assistant at Writers House named Genevieve. I didn’t find out until much later just how lucky I was; it turns out that Gen didn’t know that 130,000 words is a whole heck of a lot of words. If she’d known that 130K words would equal 500 pages, she probably wouldn’t have asked to see it. But she didn’t know (picture me wiping the sweat from my brow), and she did ask for the first three chapters. I was thrilled to get a positive response, but a little worried because I felt the beginning of the book wasn’t the strongest part. I mailed off those three chapters and got a letter back a few weeks later (I could barely get it open, my hands were so weak with fear). It was a very nice letter. She’d gone back with a pen and twice underlined the part where she’d typed how much she enjoyed the first three chapters (I still have that letter, of course), and she asked for the whole manuscript. That was the exact moment when I realized that I might actually see Twilight in print, and really one of the happiest points in my whole life. I did a lot of screaming.

 

 

 

 

Now, the next paragraph goes on to say that Meyer ends up with Jodi Reamer, who I think you're talking about.  But from what I can tell, it sounds as though Reamer also worked at Writer's House, where Genevieve was.  So if I'm understanding right, then Meyer would probably never have found Reamer if it hadn't been for Genevieve in the first place, who had no idea about word counts.

 

 

Now then, as to my own word count . . .

 

If I do include it, here's the problem.  The word count for Shallow part 1 is 121,000 words.

 

But if you count all of Shallow, it's more than double that (part 2 puts the total word count at something like 270,000).

 

Part 1 is not a standalone book--it requires the second half to be a complete book.

 

However, part 1 can be published prior to part 2, months prior or possibly even years.  I mean, theoretically you could publish it and then never publish the part 2, but without part 2 the story's nowhere near complete.  But part 1 is incredibly catchy, very fast and fun, like a tasty appetizer, and in fact I think it's probably best NOT to publish part 1 and 2 at the same time--because part 1 will build anticipation for part 2, which has a somewhat different, and in places slower, tone.

 

 

So now, hopefully, you understand my dilemma . . . and the reason why in my cover letter I stated that I'm looking for a unique publisher for a unique book.

 

I know that not every publisher is going to be able handle such a book.  But I believe it will be much more than worth it--once it gets the traction it needs.

 

So unless I'm seeing it wrong, I have two choices.  Either I tell the agent that Shallow part 1 is 121,000 words--though I had multiple posters on this thread complaining, insisting that I omit the "part 1" . . .

 

Or I omit the word count altogether.

 

Because the book is definitely over 121,000 words, and if I say "Shallow is 121,000 words," I can only imagine the aggravation it will cause once they find out about part 2. 

 

And the 270,000+ words isn't even taking into account possible sequels.

 

So what would you do?

 

And please don't say anything about cutting out 100,000 words or something.  It will never happen.  But if anyone does have good ideas, I'm open to listening.

 

Also, apologies if this comes off a little bit curt.  I didn't think this would be quite such a big issue.


My query, open to critiques:   http://agentquerycon...mantic-dramedy/


#27 dogsbody

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:52 AM

Now, the next paragraph goes on to say that Meyer ends up with Jodi Reamer, who I think you're talking about.  But from what I can tell, it sounds as though Reamer also worked at Writer's House, where Genevieve was.  So if I'm understanding right, then Meyer would probably never have found Reamer if it hadn't been for Genevieve in the first place, who had no idea about word counts.

 

Which makes a lot more sense, since an assistant is not an agent. 

 

As for your dilemma... listen. You're not going to trick anyone into publishing material they believe to be un-publishable, if that is indeed the case. So it's just a question of when they find out about the staggering wordcount, isn't it? And if it's a deal-breaker for them at the query stage, why should it be any different later on?

 

But it sounds, to me, like you have a duology on your hands. I'd sell it that way, and err on the side of caution. It's not just your work you're being judged on but your professional attitude. So perhaps it'd be to your benefit to show that while you're looking for a two-book deal from a publisher to start, you may not get one, and you can deal with that possibility. 



#28 ThatDan

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 04:49 AM

Or if that fails, see if there is any possible way to tweak the story to make part 1 have more closure. Sell it as a standalone, and once it becomes the new sliced bread, then announce "Ta Da, there is, and always has been, a part 2!"

-of course, there is always the risk that they will not sign for a part 2

#29 Erevos

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:34 AM

I think 121k is fine....if an agent likes your writing he won't turn it down. He already knows that when your ms goes into the editing phase, it will be trimmed down. I've heard of books shortened by even 20-30k words.

 

As for the part 2. Just don't mention it's written. Say 1 simple thing:

 
SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid complete at 121k words and the first of a planned series.

 

All agents will immediately know that this isn't really a stand-alone.

 

Imo, not all books have to be stand-alones. If a book sells 0 copies, then stand-alone or planned series matters not.


My Query http://agentquerycon...a-high-fantasy/ Let me know if you want me to look at yours. Will happily do so.


#30 eric balson

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 01:07 PM

Some months back I did a little bit of research, to get an idea of what kind of books are already out there that might be similar to Shallow, and how it might measure up.  I suppose you could try to compare it to different things, but the one that stuck out in my mind was Twilight.  At the time Shallow was very close to 119,000 words, which is the approximate word count for Shallow.  It's an interesting little story that read to the publication of Twilight--a lot of it was luck.  I admit that my word count is probably a little high compared to what publishers typically desire.  But I think Twilight--a first time publication--and books like it prove that you don't absolutely have to have the "right" word count to be accepted.  The really scary thing I think is that Twilight only ended up getting accepted in the first place because apparently one agent Stephanie Meyer sent the request to basically made a mistake--not realizing that 130,000 words was a lot when Meyer told her.

 

Now, perhaps I will encounter an agent who will outright reject my query because it doesn't have a word count.  Perhaps--but I'd rather take my chances with that than with telling them it's 121,000 words, when such a number is considered "too high."  The more I think about it, the more I think I just have a better chance not even bothering to mention it.  I think the really decision ought to lie with the strength of the writing--NOT how many words I've put down.  And I personally believe the manuscript is quite strong.

 

But on that note: Springfield, you asked about who I've given my ms to.  So far, just my sister and dad.  Unfortunately, I don't think it's the sort of thing that either of them really read.  I do think I should try to get some other eyes on the book if possible.  Do you have any suggestions for sites or anything where they do that?  Maybe something like this site, but for book critiques?

 

Finally . . . I admit I'm beginning to wonder if I should reduce my blurb about my copywriting job, as several have suggested.  The jury's out, but for now I still like it . . .

 

 

 

 

 

Anyway, here is the latest version of my query.  I've changed it around a lot, and I think it's quite a bit stronger than the previous version.

 

 

 

 

Dear ____

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, California college, they start to get pulled in opposing directions. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever.

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted.  While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid.

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal to break Katy free, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly. All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon. And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths.

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.

 

I feel like I've read a synopsis and not a query--it's a sprawling mess, and it doesn't encapsulate the elements agents look out for in queries like the dilemmas of the character, their motivations, the stakes, the choices they might make. I caught glimpses of some of this inside here, but for the most part, it feels muddled, as in it's not exactly clear what you're trying to communicate.

Hope this helps. Please take a look at my query here: http://agentquerycon...o-we-are/page-3



#31 lionspaws

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 01:57 PM

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, their California college, they start to get pulled in opposing directions. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever. I don't think the details about college location are important, and since it's clear their in college, I think you could leave their ages out. Also, why would a shooting pull them apart? Is one white, one black? This opening paragraph is a lot of backstory. See if you can condense... "Best college friends Jynnete and Katy are opposites--one is a free-spirit with a flare for fashion, the other is a strong-willed Christian feminist studying science..." for example. I'd skip delving into boyfriends at this point. 

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted. While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid. I really can't tell what the focus of the plot is. The shooting, or their love lives? If so, how are they connected? 

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal to break Katy free not sure what that means, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly. All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon. And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths. 

 

I think you need to decide what your focus is for the query; what's going on in the community, or the girls' personal lives. What is each of their goals and what's the problem keeping them from achieving it? 

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more. I'd just say that you worked as a copyrighter--keep it succinct. And... though I'm no expert... you do need to have a word count in here; I think it will make agents suspicious otherwise. 

 

I can tell you've really delved into the world of tense currents events in our culture, and that's brave! I am interested in the girls' lives and what happens to them. I just think there's some focusing and clarifying that needs to happen here. Thank you for your comments on mine! (That was, like, my tenth version, I think... :)


http://agentquerycon...sail-the-stars/

http://agentquerycon...ique-in-return/

 

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#32 Springfield

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 02:47 PM

First, just to set the record straight, this is from http://stepheniemeye...ting-published/

 

 

My big break came in the form of an assistant at Writers House named Genevieve. I didn’t find out until much later just how lucky I was; it turns out that Gen didn’t know that 130,000 words is a whole heck of a lot of words. If she’d known that 130K words would equal 500 pages, she probably wouldn’t have asked to see it. But she didn’t know (picture me wiping the sweat from my brow), and she did ask for the first three chapters. I was thrilled to get a positive response, but a little worried because I felt the beginning of the book wasn’t the strongest part. I mailed off those three chapters and got a letter back a few weeks later (I could barely get it open, my hands were so weak with fear). It was a very nice letter. She’d gone back with a pen and twice underlined the part where she’d typed how much she enjoyed the first three chapters (I still have that letter, of course), and she asked for the whole manuscript. That was the exact moment when I realized that I might actually see Twilight in print, and really one of the happiest points in my whole life. I did a lot of screaming.

 

 

 

 

Now, the next paragraph goes on to say that Meyer ends up with Jodi Reamer, who I think you're talking about.  But from what I can tell, it sounds as though Reamer also worked at Writer's House, where Genevieve was.  So if I'm understanding right, then Meyer would probably never have found Reamer if it hadn't been for Genevieve in the first place, who had no idea about word counts.

 

 

Now then, as to my own word count . . .

 

If I do include it, here's the problem.  The word count for Shallow part 1 is 121,000 words.

 

But if you count all of Shallow, it's more than double that (part 2 puts the total word count at something like 270,000).

 

Part 1 is not a standalone book--it requires the second half to be a complete book.

 

However, part 1 can be published prior to part 2, months prior or possibly even years.  I mean, theoretically you could publish it and then never publish the part 2, but without part 2 the story's nowhere near complete.  But part 1 is incredibly catchy, very fast and fun, like a tasty appetizer, and in fact I think it's probably best NOT to publish part 1 and 2 at the same time--because part 1 will build anticipation for part 2, which has a somewhat different, and in places slower, tone.

 

 

So now, hopefully, you understand my dilemma . . . and the reason why in my cover letter I stated that I'm looking for a unique publisher for a unique book.

 

I know that not every publisher is going to be able handle such a book.  But I believe it will be much more than worth it--once it gets the traction it needs.

 

So unless I'm seeing it wrong, I have two choices.  Either I tell the agent that Shallow part 1 is 121,000 words--though I had multiple posters on this thread complaining, insisting that I omit the "part 1" . . .

 

Or I omit the word count altogether.

 

Because the book is definitely over 121,000 words, and if I say "Shallow is 121,000 words," I can only imagine the aggravation it will cause once they find out about part 2. 

 

And the 270,000+ words isn't even taking into account possible sequels.

 

So what would you do?

 

And please don't say anything about cutting out 100,000 words or something.  It will never happen.  But if anyone does have good ideas, I'm open to listening.

 

Also, apologies if this comes off a little bit curt.  I didn't think this would be quite such a big issue.

 

Attempting to slip something by agents or whatever, is a terrible idea, to begin with. It's not the way to start a relationship. 

 

Aside from that, this isn't going to work. Getting an agent interested in one book that's 50% longer than it should be is one near-impossible task. You can't just spring on them that it's not a complete book. You will not sell a 270,000 novel. Will not happen. Even a fantasy that won't fly. An NA thing? Not in the realm of possibility. It's three books worth of words.

 

Nevermind that no one, absolutely no one, agent or publisher, wants a first novel that does not stand alone. No one is buying that on a trade level, I'm sorry. It has to stand alone. 

 

You wrote 270,000 words. You CAN edit them. You can make a book that stands alone with potential sequels, or you might find it works as one book telling one character's story with another telling an alternate pov. 

 

However, I'm trying to save you time and trouble here -- you can't sell a non-standalone work, or a work of 270,000 words, and lying about what it is, or omitting the details only to tell someone later is not going to be to your benefit. It will only serve to piss people off and burn bridges. Don't do that. It's wholly unprofessional. It'd be like applying to work as a horse groomer and then showing up and saying you have a deadly allergy to horses. Will only piss people off.



#33 Iconian

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:40 PM

Which makes a lot more sense, since an assistant is not an agent. 

 

As for your dilemma... listen. You're not going to trick anyone into publishing material they believe to be un-publishable, if that is indeed the case. So it's just a question of when they find out about the staggering wordcount, isn't it? And if it's a deal-breaker for them at the query stage, why should it be any different later on?

 

But it sounds, to me, like you have a duology on your hands. I'd sell it that way, and err on the side of caution. It's not just your work you're being judged on but your professional attitude. So perhaps it'd be to your benefit to show that while you're looking for a two-book deal from a publisher to start, you may not get one, and you can deal with that possibility. 

 

I don't want to trick anyone into publishing my book--if I was trying to trick them then I'd just go ahead and say "Shallow is complete at 121,000 words."  But tricking them into simply beginning to read it by bypassing their natural prejudices . . .

 

A duology?

 

Each part is basically the size of a full length novel.  I suppose you could pretty much say it's a duology.

 

That might just work . . .

 

Or if that fails, see if there is any possible way to tweak the story to make part 1 have more closure. Sell it as a standalone, and once it becomes the new sliced bread, then announce "Ta Da, there is, and always has been, a part 2!"

-of course, there is always the risk that they will not sign for a part 2

 

Part one ends on multiple cliffhangers.  Tweaking it into a standalone would be like cutting off an arm and a leg--it will collapse.

 

I'm still quite torn about what's best for Shallow.  If I can find the right agent and publisher, I know it can work . . .


My query, open to critiques:   http://agentquerycon...mantic-dramedy/


#34 dogsbody

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 04:14 PM

I certainly don't think it should be taken as anything but the exception that proves the rule, but... it is possible to sell a debut at 250K+. People have done it. Usually in fantasy, for instance most recently: "The Name of the Wind" was published at 259K, "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norell" at 314K, and who knows how much got cut from the initial drafts sent to agents. 

 

I would never encourage someone to try and publish at that length. But no one should say it won't happen, because it has.  

Similarly, people buy and sell the first books in intended trilogies or intended duologies (or more) all the time. I would never tell a querying author to count on it. But people are offering multiple book deals for authors who don't think they can finish their stories in one book.  

 

Personally, I think it's about weighing the risk involved. Do all of these factors decrease your chances? Absolutely. 

 

But you're not just playing the odds, here. There are multiple paths to success, multiple definitions of success. If a writer's aim is to get their work out asap, start smaller and build up, then you'd want to minimize all those risks. But if a writer has a particular book or story they want to send out into the world, and that is their principle aim, then it's less about the risks and more about finding those agents, editors, and publishers who share their vision. And as long as you don't mind the hard work (there will be revisions regardless) and possible longer wait to find those people, the odds matter less overall. 

 

In short, Iconian, almost everyone who's giving you advice is "right" in some sense. Which advice you should take depends on how you define your success as a writer. 

 

Except, yeah: don't lie or try to trick the people who you hope to be working with for a long, long time. 

 

ETA:

 

 

I don't want to trick anyone into publishing my book--if I was trying to trick them then I'd just go ahead and say "Shallow is complete at 121,000 words."  But tricking them into simply beginning to read it by bypassing their natural prejudices . . .

 

My advice? Don't. Again: when you leave off the wordcount, agents know what that means. Many of them will auto-reject because they don't appreciate the tactic.

 

And I also advise not to try to get around "natural prejudices." You wrote a long book. You want an agent who likes long books, who won't try to get you to make it into something else. If an agent believes your wordcount, and only your wordcount, is a good reason to pass? They are not the agent for you. Full stop. 

 

Please keep in mind that agents buy books they think they can sell and like on a personal level, because they know they'll be working on it for possibly years. It's not just about finding a book that's "good." Lots of agents talk about passing on books they knew would sell, and sell well, because they didn't enjoy it enough to put in the work. IMO the best way to find your agent is to be as honest as possible, as early as possible, about what kind of book you have written. 



#35 lyncfs

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 05:29 PM

Dear ____

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, California  ​their college, they start to get pulled in opposing directions ​(can you think of a strong word than opposing directions? their friendship starts fraying or is torn apart (some kind of turn a phrase).. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. ​(this is a bit of telling. It would be interesting if you could show how they think differently through some examples perhaps) Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever.

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted. While a seemingly ​(hmmm this makes me think he's not all he portrays himself to be. Explain more of this or cut) great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around ​(how is he bad? I would like more details)—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid. ​(good...ties back to being her protector).

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal ​(I don't think zeal is the right word here) to break Katy free, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice ​(wait is her new boyfriend a different race than her? This would be important to mention given the shooting) fly. All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon.​(This is like a list - might want to cut as it's not central to their conflict) And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths​(This last line is too vague. Again, I feel like this is a laundry list. Maybe pick one defining event that is tearing Jynnete apart. A little confusing too since you said in the 2nd paragraph she has a great boyfriend).

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid (at X Words). In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear ____

Best friends Jynnete and Katy, both 20 and recent enrollees at California's Merson Valley Community College, are something of an odd couple. Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and compassionate, and trying to break into fashion, while Jynnete is a thinker, pursuing a chemistry degree, and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their perspectives on life often collide, but perhaps nowhere more than in their dating lives, sometimes bringing anger and disapproval from Jynnete, tears from Katy.  And having just dumped her own latest boyfriend, Jynnete's now feeling more frustrated than ever, ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever.

 

But then a racially-motivated shooting occurs at their college and the community is turned upside down, with students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign.” Schisms open up among the locals, and soon business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots seem just on the horizon.

 

Yet for Jynnete and Katy it will go far beyond all this even. While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy starts contemplating marriage with practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. Tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly as Jynnete pushes harder and harder to get him out of Katy's life, and untold stories send them and their friends careening down ever more uncertain paths.

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.

 

 

 

Dear ____

Tour a slice of life, from Jynnete, Katy, and more, as they face the new challenges brought on by college, romances, adulthood—and the school shooting that precipitates the untold stories that dwarf it all.

 

Best friends Jynnete and Katy, both 20 and recent enrollees at the Merson Valley Community College in California's Central Valley, are something of an odd couple. Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited, compassionate, and fun-loving. Jynnete is mostly a thinker, more scientific-minded, and considers herself a Christian feminist, though she also knows to let her hair down at times. Their contrasting perspectives, personalities, and stances toward romance sometimes bring them and their other friends into disagreement or even conflict—but mostly their relationships are harmonious, if colorful.

 

But shortly after they've returned from Winter Break and only one semester into college, much of their world changes in a day. Without any warning, a racially-motivated shooting occurs at their college, leaving four dead in the wake. The community is turned upside down, and students turn out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign.”

 

Schisms begin to open up among the locals, tensions start to flare and accusations start to fly—and it's not long before business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots seem to be just on the horizon in what had been a quiet center of tourism and agriculture.

 

Yet for Jynnete and Katy it will go far beyond all this even, with still more surprising and explosive revelations in their personal lives and those close to them, as untold stories send them careening down ever more uncertain paths.

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES part 1 is a New Adult romance hybrid, coming in at 121,792 words. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear _____

I'm seeking the right agent/publisher for my book, Shallow World: A Sunny-Thorned Seed for the Untold Stories. It's one of those unique sorts of books that, at a casual glance, might seem likely to alienate most readers, even among its core audience. I fear as such that most publishers would, by default, try to relegate it to some obscure corner of the publishing world, if not shy away altogether. But in fact, I believe it would be very successful and likely experience near-universal appeal after getting some traction. How so?

 

Imagine, for example, a historical drama, set in the midst of hundreds of people drowning and freezing to death, and featuring a high-profile centerpiece of blatant female nudity—and yet I insisted to you that the story would perform better with school-age girls than anyone. Or, a second example: a story on a planet in a distant star system, featuring nudity and strange sexual customs of aliens that are under assault by human aggressors—and again I felt younger females would be one of its strongest audiences. In response, some might tell me that these elements seem far too incongruous, and such tales might be best confined to smaller indie crowds, such as history aficionados or sci-fi enthusiasts, and that perhaps I even ought to have my head examined if I seriously thought such stories would be well-suited to young women above all.

 

However, the descriptions I have provided are of Titanic and Avatar, two of the highest-grossing movies of all time. Unique, but somehow they worked.

 

So, when I tell you that I've spun a high-energy romance-hybrid with an intellectual bent, touching to greater or lesser degrees on shootings, homelessness, polyamory, gender, homosexuality, gun ownership, relationships and dating, prejudice, feminism, spirituality and religion, politics, philosophy, love, and more; and while I think the book will have a wide-reaching draw, I believe it would be best-suited to young women—I hope you can grant me the benefit of the doubt.

 

Shallow World is a New Adult drama/comedy/romance dipping into the lives of best friends Jynnete and Katy, both 20 years old. The initial focus is their experiences with college, jobs, new cars, apartments, relationships with friends and boyfriends—until their lives are turned on their heads after a racially-motivated shooting at their local college, slingshotting both girls toward completely new events and revelations, and the unknown.

 

I think many people will dislike a number of things in my book, but I also think there is far more to appreciate about Shallow World. It is probably the most engaging, entertaining, and relevant book I could have written at this time; it's a book that I believe needed to be written, and I hope you'll find it's a book that needs to be read. Read with an open mind, and I expect this story will bring enjoyment and new value into your life and the lives of all those it touches.

 

This is way better than your last query I read. I still have questions but I think you can flesh them out and this will be great. 


THE IMMORTAL GUARD. Link to my query. Please critique, if I have reviewed yours.

#36 Iconian

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:34 PM

I certainly don't think it should be taken as anything but the exception that proves the rule, but... it is possible to sell a debut at 250K+. People have done it. Usually in fantasy, for instance most recently: "The Name of the Wind" was published at 259K, "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norell" at 314K, and who knows how much got cut from the initial drafts sent to agents. 

 

I would never encourage someone to try and publish at that length. But no one should say it won't happen, because it has.  

Similarly, people buy and sell the first books in intended trilogies or intended duologies (or more) all the time. I would never tell a querying author to count on it. But people are offering multiple book deals for authors who don't think they can finish their stories in one book.  

 

Personally, I think it's about weighing the risk involved. Do all of these factors decrease your chances? Absolutely. 

 

But you're not just playing the odds, here. There are multiple paths to success, multiple definitions of success. If a writer's aim is to get their work out asap, start smaller and build up, then you'd want to minimize all those risks. But if a writer has a particular book or story they want to send out into the world, and that is their principle aim, then it's less about the risks and more about finding those agents, editors, and publishers who share their vision. And as long as you don't mind the hard work (there will be revisions regardless) and possible longer wait to find those people, the odds matter less overall. 

 

In short, Iconian, almost everyone who's giving you advice is "right" in some sense. Which advice you should take depends on how you define your success as a writer. 

 

Except, yeah: don't lie or try to trick the people who you hope to be working with for a long, long time. 

 

ETA:

 

 

My advice? Don't. Again: when you leave off the wordcount, agents know what that means. Many of them will auto-reject because they don't appreciate the tactic.

 

And I also advise not to try to get around "natural prejudices." You wrote a long book. You want an agent who likes long books, who won't try to get you to make it into something else. If an agent believes your wordcount, and only your wordcount, is a good reason to pass? They are not the agent for you. Full stop. 

 

Please keep in mind that agents buy books they think they can sell and like on a personal level, because they know they'll be working on it for possibly years. It's not just about finding a book that's "good." Lots of agents talk about passing on books they knew would sell, and sell well, because they didn't enjoy it enough to put in the work. IMO the best way to find your agent is to be as honest as possible, as early as possible, about what kind of book you have written. 

 

 

The more I think about it, the more I think you're right.  It will involve some difficulties . . .

 

Part 1 is done, but part 2 is only half way complete.  I haven't been sure how to approach it.

 

Now, I'm thinking that the best thing may just be to tell them exactly that.  Shallow is a duology, and part 1 is complete and ready for publication.  Part 2 is still in progress, but should be done soon.

 

And, while I do feel like I was a lot more balanced in many ways ten years ago, these days, I kind of feel like it's Shallow or nothing.  I had a much larger series in the works years ago, much broader in scope and basically completely different, but it grew so large without ever getting off the ground.  Then last year I came up with Shallow, a completely new idea, it's own story, and much shorter.

 

I know there will still be revisions for Shallow--it's not a perfect book, and there will have to be changes.  Possibly I could lose ten thousand words, maybe more even, from part 1.  But there are definitely some things I can't compromise about it.

 

I just hope I can find someone that's able to share my vision.  It can be difficult when the whole industry is set up the way it is . . .


My query, open to critiques:   http://agentquerycon...mantic-dramedy/


#37 Springfield

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 09:08 PM

The Name of the Wind is fantasy; Jonathan Strange... is a doorstopper, yes, with illustrations, footnotes, and it's alt/history/fantasy. Both were also more than a decade ago. 

 

The OP is attempting to sell an NA contemporary -- NA is barely hanging on as a category as it is. It's not supporting outliers. 

 

In addition, what examples are there of trade publishers buying debut cliffhanger books? I don't know of anything even remotely close to that. It'd be hard to sell a non standalone from a known author. From an unknown? Not happening. I'm sorry. 

 

Hey, maybe the wc is somehow justified, but I've rarely ever seen a massive one that is. It's usually just something that needs editing. I'm not trying to be discouraging -- I'm trying to help. Saying 'one time, this one thing in another category broke the rules,' doesn't suggest this, now, can break SEVERAL rules all at once and be successful.



#38 Candace

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:04 AM

 

Dear ____

Jynnete and Katy, 20, have been best friends for over a decade—but after a racially-motivated shooting occurs at the Merson Valley, California college, they start to get pulled in opposing directions. The BFF's have always been something of an odd couple: Katy is emotional and energetic, free-spirited and sensitive, and looking to break into fashion; Jynnete is a thinker with an angry streak pursuing a chemistry degree (This reads as if the angry streak is pursuing a chemistry degree; easy fix. "Jynnete, a thinker with an angry streak, is pursuing a ..."), and considers herself a Christian feminist. Their differences are perhaps nowhere more evident than in their dating lives, with Katy's regular heartbreak and tears pushing Jynnete toward the role of her protector. And now, with Jynnete having just seethingly dumped her latest boyfriend, she's feeling more frustrated than ever—ready to throw in the towel and swear off men forever.

 

But in the wake of the shooting, with their community turned upside down and students turning out in droves to attend the college's “End Prejudice Campaign,” very little can be taken for granted. While a seemingly great guy falls into Jynnete's lap, Katy's newest boyfriend is practically the worst guy around—at least in Jynnete's eyes. For one of the first times in her life Jynnete feels powerless, watching as he leads Katy in almost every perilous direction that she had tried to help her avoid.

 

Katy begins to contemplate marriage, while Jynnete struggles with increasing zeal to break Katy free, and soon tensions flare and accusations of prejudice fly. All around them schisms open up among the Merson Valley locals, with business boycotts, a mayoral recall election, and even riots just on the horizon. And in her own life, as Jynnete battles to retain stability and normalcy, she feels herself being driven away from her friends, her new boyfriend, her beliefs, and more, even as untold stories send them all careening down still more uncertain paths.

 

SHALLOW WORLD: A SUNNY-THORNED SEED FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES is a fast-paced New Adult romance hybrid. In 2006 I was one of 12 candidates selected out of hundreds as a copywriter for a financial institution. After a year as a copywriter life led me down other paths, but I've now returned to my love of writing once more.

 

Sorry, I wish I could offer more advice. As you know, I haven't yet developed the 'eyes' of an experienced query critiquer yet. Just some minor suggestions above to tighten it up.



#39 Iconian

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 02:06 AM

Thank you again to everyone who's responded today!  Tomorrow I plan on getting a new version of the query out.  It's really quite an experience being on this forum, hearing so many different viewpoints on my writing.  Definitely something new.  I think I'm growing as a writer for it.

 

secondstar87, thank you--yes, I've always been a pretty brave person.  I feel like literature can do so much in our world.  This book, if it does get published, might actually have a chance to fix some of the gridlock in our world, I think.  I'm glad you like the characters.  Hopefully the readers will feel the same :D

 

 

Now . . .

 

The Name of the Wind is fantasy; Jonathan Strange... is a doorstopper, yes, with illustrations, footnotes, and it's alt/history/fantasy. Both were also more than a decade ago. 

 

The OP is attempting to sell an NA contemporary -- NA is barely hanging on as a category as it is. It's not supporting outliers. 

 

In addition, what examples are there of trade publishers buying debut cliffhanger books? I don't know of anything even remotely close to that. It'd be hard to sell a non standalone from a known author. From an unknown? Not happening. I'm sorry. 

 

Hey, maybe the wc is somehow justified, but I've rarely ever seen a massive one that is. It's usually just something that needs editing. I'm not trying to be discouraging -- I'm trying to help. Saying 'one time, this one thing in another category broke the rules,' doesn't suggest this, now, can break SEVERAL rules all at once and be successful.

 

OK.  Perhaps it is time for me to address some of this.

 

First of all, Springfield, just because no one's ever done something before, that you're aware of, or even that I'm aware of, doesn't mean it's not going to work.  Nor does it necessarily mean it will work--but I think all I've experienced from you virtually from the moment I joined this forum is a stream of reasons why everything I've written is bad.  I don't mind constructive criticism, but really, how often do you actually make attempts to encourage writers out there--or, say, direct them toward useful resources that could actually help them increase their chances for publication?  Or is your primary intent on this site to check off a list with every possible reason a given book might fail, and discourage writers from even trying?  That's sure what it seems like.  How many blossoming writers have you torpedoed before they even had a chance to spread their wings and fly?

 

I appreciate your constructive criticism--I do--but maybe I ought to give you a little taste of it yourself.

 

I don't know you well, but just from my dealings with you within the last few days, you seem like an incredibly inflexible person.  Instead of looking for ways a book might succeed and be enjoyed by readers, all you seem to see are reasons for it to fail, based on all the requirements you've read out there.  Granted that this is from the very cursory contact I've had with you on this thread, but it's my suspicion that other writers would back me up.  Again, how many writers have you pushed away from the industry through your barrage of negativity, without ever catching sight of their potential?  Possibly it's none--apparently you've only been on the site about a year and a half, and there are plenty of others giving opinions on stuff.  But what I'm not understanding is, if you're so experienced and knowledgeable about how the industry works, why not give me some meaningful advice on publishers and agents that are exceptions to the commonly accepted rules you always bring up, instead of just telling me there's no way my book will sell?

 

Beyond that: so far as NA goes, it's still a young genre.  I figure you know it only came to be considered a real genre about ten years ago, but since then, from what I've read it's grown quite a lot.  I first read about it around a year ago, and it fills a niche that neither YA nor Adult nor any other genre covers.  My (admittedly uninformed) opinion is that now that the genre has come into existence, it will never disappear.  It might wax and wane as the years go by as with many trends, maybe like disco or something, but it's a genre of writing that I think a lot more people would read, if they even knew it existed.

 

In fact, maybe Shallow will even be the book that really puts the genre on the map.  But since--so far as I can tell--you've been exclusively looking for reasons why Shallow will fail, I suppose that's something that likely hasn't entered into the rather narrow requirements you seem to have concluded for how a book can be successful--in spite the various exceptions to those rules.

 

And as far as word count, yes, the 121,000 words for part 1 could probably be reduced by a few thousand and the ms would be tighter for it.  But frankly this is a different kind of book, and once it gets out there I think most of the fans will agree that the word count was much more than justified.

 

Anyway, I'm not going to attempt to address all the points you've brought up throughout the course of this thread, seeing as I have a query to focus on.  I will simply say again that just because you've never seen something like I'm suggesting work, doesn't mean it can't.

 

Thank you for your comments, but I would appreciate it, and find it much more useful, if instead of solely pointing out possibilities for failure, you'd also use your energy to give me some pointers on who out there might be willing to pick up a book like mine.  That would probably help me a lot, and I'm guessing you likely have a lot more familiarity with the industry than I.

 

This is not said out of anger, only constructive criticism.  I hope you'll take some of it to heart.

 

 

 

Tomorrow I'll plan on the next version of my query, as well as giving out some more critiques--see you all then!


My query, open to critiques:   http://agentquerycon...mantic-dramedy/


#40 jaustail

jaustail

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 02:48 AM

I read werelord series that had cliffhangers till the final book (number 6) was published. You can sell your huge book into two separate books. It's for the agent to decide if the first one will be a big success to guarantee  the need of a second one.

 

But it's a big risk.







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