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Synopsis problem, could use some advice.


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#1 Faltho

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 08:02 AM

Alright, I'm working on the dreaded synopsis. I'm also trying to keep it under 500 words, as that seems to be what most people in the YA fantasy realm are looking for (short one-page synopsis). So, here's my issue. I have a twist at the end of my book. Now, to be able to properly explain this twist (make it not feel like a deus ex machina), I'd be forced to include a couple of additional subplots in the synopsis. However, if I were to do this, it'd most likely put me way over the word limit(s) and maybe make the synopsis feel more clunky and explanatory.

 

So, do I leave out the major twist of the book to keep with the word count, or do I go back to the drawing board and try to find a way to organically include all the information in the synopsis without losing the flow and destroying the length? Would it severely turn off an agent to read a synopsis, then see a twist ending not mentioned (even though the ending, and basic plot points are all mentioned)? Any advice would be a massive help.   



#2 smithgirl

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 09:00 AM

I think you that if your synopsis includes the ending and basic plot points, you are good. Even in the synopsis you have to, by necessity, omit a ridiculous amount of info. However, I think it can be a bit longer than 500 words -- more like 700 words. Basically 1 page single-spaced with 12pt Times New Roman 1-inch margins. In my case that was more like 700 words. 



#3 Faltho

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:22 AM

I think you that if your synopsis includes the ending and basic plot points, you are good. Even in the synopsis you have to, by necessity, omit a ridiculous amount of info. However, I think it can be a bit longer than 500 words -- more like 700 words. Basically 1 page single-spaced with 12pt Times New Roman 1-inch margins. In my case that was more like 700 words. 

 

Smithgirl, as always, thanks for your response! In all honesty, I figured as much, but I didn't want to assume when it comes to how much of a stickler some agents are. I would generally agree as well on the length, however; I've been running into some forms which have a word cap at 500. So, to be safe I was trying to squeeze it all in as to not need a 2nd version.



#4 smithgirl

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 01:52 PM

Smithgirl, as always, thanks for your response! In all honesty, I figured as much, but I didn't want to assume when it comes to how much of a stickler some agents are. I would generally agree as well on the length, however; I've been running into some forms which have a word cap at 500. So, to be safe I was trying to squeeze it all in as to not need a 2nd version.

 

 

Oh, a form! The forms I've encountered in the past always accommodated my synopsis. I think it's a bit unreasonable to require a synopsis with just 500 words. Oh well. Good luck.



#5 Springfield

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 12:56 AM

I

 

Alright, I'm working on the dreaded synopsis. I'm also trying to keep it under 500 words, as that seems to be what most people in the YA fantasy realm are looking for (short one-page synopsis). So, here's my issue. I have a twist at the end of my book. Now, to be able to properly explain this twist (make it not feel like a deus ex machina), I'd be forced to include a couple of additional subplots in the synopsis. However, if I were to do this, it'd most likely put me way over the word limit(s) and maybe make the synopsis feel more clunky and explanatory.

 

So, do I leave out the major twist of the book to keep with the word count, or do I go back to the drawing board and try to find a way to organically include all the information in the synopsis without losing the flow and destroying the length? Would it severely turn off an agent to read a synopsis, then see a twist ending not mentioned (even though the ending, and basic plot points are all mentioned)? Any advice would be a massive help.   

'

I'd put it in. It's fairly simple to cut something down. Put it all in and then slice away.



#6 kathleenq

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:58 PM

Alright, I'm working on the dreaded synopsis. I'm also trying to keep it under 500 words, as that seems to be what most people in the YA fantasy realm are looking for (short one-page synopsis). So, here's my issue. I have a twist at the end of my book. Now, to be able to properly explain this twist (make it not feel like a deus ex machina), I'd be forced to include a couple of additional subplots in the synopsis. However, if I were to do this, it'd most likely put me way over the word limit(s) and maybe make the synopsis feel more clunky and explanatory.

 

So, do I leave out the major twist of the book to keep with the word count, or do I go back to the drawing board and try to find a way to organically include all the information in the synopsis without losing the flow and destroying the length? Would it severely turn off an agent to read a synopsis, then see a twist ending not mentioned (even though the ending, and basic plot points are all mentioned)? Any advice would be a massive help.   

You say you have a twist ending that you're questioning about including, but you include the ending and basic plot points? I'm confused by how these are different. If the twist is also the ending, then you do need to include it. If it's just a plot point, it might not be necessary unless you need it to explain the ending.

 

I think it's better to write it in and then start cutting things out as you get more feedback about clarity and detail.


Synopsis: Glass Domes


#7 Faltho

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 05:52 AM

Kathleenq, perhaps I miss-spoke. This is a plot twist which occurs near the end. I'm still able to give a summary of how the book ends, especially leaving out this point. The other issue I run into is, to properly explain the twist, I'd need to add an additional 3 names to my synopsis (bringing me to six names in 500 words), and it becomes a mess when I'm trying to keep it short and succinct.



#8 kathleenq

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 02:49 PM

Kathleenq, perhaps I miss-spoke. This is a plot twist which occurs near the end. I'm still able to give a summary of how the book ends, especially leaving out this point. The other issue I run into is, to properly explain the twist, I'd need to add an additional 3 names to my synopsis (bringing me to six names in 500 words), and it becomes a mess when I'm trying to keep it short and succinct.

Got it! I would then try to write the synopsis without the twist for the time being, and if multiple people get confused about what's going on, then work it in later.


Synopsis: Glass Domes





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