Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

Publisher feedback. . .


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:00 PM

I sent a query straight to a publisher that reviewed them without an agent. I asked for feedback regarding the query and he stated it was good, which I was relieved. My feedback on this site regarding my query has been somewhat humbling. My question is How do I know what is right? 



#2 Faltho

Faltho

    Wanderer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 140 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Amazon best-seller; Playing Smarter, Using Math: The Traveling Mathematician's Guide to Playing the Lottery (Self-Published)

Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:26 PM

I sent a query straight to a publisher that reviewed them without an agent. I asked for feedback regarding the query and he stated it was good, which I was relieved. My feedback on this site regarding my query has been somewhat humbling. My question is How do I know what is right? 

 

You've discovered the dark secret of the querying process, there is no right answer. I always tell my statistics classes at the beginning of the semester that there are some questions we'll encounter with no right answer, but quite a variety of wrong answers. The same is true here. You can send the exact same query to five different agents, and get five completely different and even contradictory responses. This is, in part, because a query -just like the process of an agent picking books- is very subjective. So, you'll eventually get to a point where you're comfortable with your query -having taken, and ignored some advice from those on this site- and are willing to accept that some agents will like it, and some will hate it. Sadly, there's no magical right way to write a query. But, there are quite a few wrong ways to do it.  



#3 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:33 PM

Thank you wanderer, he suggested to change the title of my book. This might be stupid but I should listen here? 

 

edit: I am just asking because I think I might have fallen in love with my own work. 



#4 Springfield

Springfield

    Find me at properediting.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:09 PM

I sent a query straight to a publisher that reviewed them without an agent. I asked for feedback regarding the query and he stated it was good, which I was relieved. My feedback on this site regarding my query has been somewhat humbling. My question is How do I know what is right? 

Did he offer you a contract? If not, take everything he said with a very large grain of salt. 



#5 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:12 PM

Did he offer you a contract? If not, take everything he said with a very large grain of salt. 

No, it was the wrong genre.

 

Edit: This is just a guessing game at this point. 



#6 Springfield

Springfield

    Find me at properediting.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:27 PM

No, it was the wrong genre.

 

Edit: This is just a guessing game at this point. 

 

It's not, really. 

 

Why were you querying a publisher who doesn't pub what you write? 

 

If you're looking for agents, you shouldn't be querying publishers to begin with, but regardless.



#7 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:39 PM

It's not, really. 

 

Why were you querying a publisher who doesn't pub what you write? 

 

If you're looking for agents, you shouldn't be querying publishers to begin with, but regardless.

I misread the submissions, he said Sci-fi and I have a YA/Sci-fi. 

 

What I am saying from guessing standpoint is everyone on this site thinks everything has to be a certain way. I read the successful queries and that isn't always the case, if it was the case, everyone following the formula would be published. I understand following the formula is giving you a better chance. Too me, it's all a gray area. 



#8 Springfield

Springfield

    Find me at properediting.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:47 PM

I misread the submissions, he said Sci-fi and I have a YA/Sci-fi. 

 

What I am saying from guessing standpoint is everyone on this site thinks everything has to be a certain way. I read the successful queries and that isn't always the case, if it was the case, everyone following the formula would be published. I understand following the formula is giving you a better chance. Too me, it's all a gray area. 

 

No, it's not always the case, but like everything else, to break the rules, you have to first have a solid grasp on them, and a reason to break them.

 

If you want to make a chocolate cake flavoured with something really different, first you have to know what flavourings go with chocolate, what people traditionally use and why, what doesn't go and why, and what other flavour profiles work and don't, and why. Then you can play around. Otherwise, yeah, you're off in the dark in the kitchen going, 'hey, someone put hot peppers with chocolate and I've never seen that, so I'll do sardines!' 

 

It's not just a guessing game. You can break the rules, but you have to know what rules you're breaking and why first. 

 

Best query I've ever seen was 90 words, in I think 10 single sentences with paragraph breaks. Broke the rules, but was brilliant. I wouldn't tell someone else to set up a query like that, same as I wouldn't tell a novice baker to open the cabinet and chuck something in their chocolate cake. Mostly, people really like chocolate cake so it's a good bet that works 90% of the time.



#9 Faltho

Faltho

    Wanderer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 140 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Amazon best-seller; Playing Smarter, Using Math: The Traveling Mathematician's Guide to Playing the Lottery (Self-Published)

Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:52 PM

Thank you wanderer, he suggested to change the title of my book. This might be stupid but I should listen here? 

 

edit: I am just asking because I think I might have fallen in love with my own work. 

 

I would suggest in this case bringing that up on this forum. There's a title tester section. Based on some feedback there, you'd probably get a more thoughtful and educated guess.



#10 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 11 September 2017 - 05:15 PM

No, it's not always the case, but like everything else, to break the rules, you have to first have a solid grasp on them, and a reason to break them.

 

If you want to make a chocolate cake flavoured with something really different, first you have to know what flavourings go with chocolate, what people traditionally use and why, what doesn't go and why, and what other flavour profiles work and don't, and why. Then you can play around. Otherwise, yeah, you're off in the dark in the kitchen going, 'hey, someone put hot peppers with chocolate and I've never seen that, so I'll do sardines!' 

 

It's not just a guessing game. You can break the rules, but you have to know what rules you're breaking and why first. 

 

Best query I've ever seen was 90 words, in I think 10 single sentences with paragraph breaks. Broke the rules, but was brilliant. I wouldn't tell someone else to set up a query like that, same as I wouldn't tell a novice baker to open the cabinet and chuck something in their chocolate cake. Mostly, people really like chocolate cake so it's a good bet that works 90% of the time.

 

I can't argue against your points.


I would suggest in this case bringing that up on this forum. There's a title tester section. Based on some feedback there, you'd probably get a more thoughtful and educated guess.

 

 

Faitho, thank you! I just listed it. I had no idea there was a section for this.



#11 LucidDreamer

LucidDreamer

    Pragmatic Dreamer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,046 posts
  • Literary Status:published, agented
  • LocationUS Southeast
  • Publishing Experience:Blue Ridge Library Mystery series, written as Victoria Gilbert. 1st book -- A MURDER FOR THE BOOKS -- releasing from Crooked Lane Books in December 2017. Book Two -- SHELVED UNDER MURDER -- will be published in July 2018 and untitled as of yet book three in Jan. or Feb. 2019.

Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:07 AM

Also, just to be clear -- even with an agent, publication is NOT guaranteed. Once you are working with an agent, they must submit your work to editors at publishing houses. This is a lot like querying all over again, and it is just as subjective.

 

So many factors go into something getting traditionally published. As others have said, there is no perfect formula. The best thing is to learn all you can (as you seem to be doing) and persist.

 

And keep writing!



#12 Jonas

Jonas

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 34 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:29 AM

Also, just to be clear -- even with an agent, publication is NOT guaranteed. Once you are working with an agent, they must submit your work to editors at publishing houses. This is a lot like querying all over again, and it is just as subjective.

 

So many factors go into something getting traditionally published. As others have said, there is no perfect formula. The best thing is to learn all you can (as you seem to be doing) and persist.

 

And keep writing!

 

Exactly, publication is never guaranteed. Writing is all about fortitude and learning. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users