Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

Query or Sample pages?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Erevos

Erevos

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 91 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationEurope

Posted 29 November 2017 - 07:58 AM

I know of course that a good query can definitely help, but aren't sample pages more important?

 

So far I've sent out 10 queries and had 7 "NO". The first 5 I knew they were gonna fail, since I realized I had many mistakes in my MS after I pressed that SEND button...but the last 2 I had high hopes for.

 

Now, my query isn't the best, but it's not bad either. I have 2 POV/MC (One old man and one young boy) and I wrote the query from the pov of the old man, mainly because I couldn't write stakes from the perspective of the young boy, at least not without delving too deep into the story.

 

The question of whether my query works or not has been gnawing at me for quite a while... (Of course sometimes both the query and the writing work, but an agent isn't simply interested.)

 

On the other hand, out of the 7 rejections, 2 were personalized. They both read the prologue and told me exactly why they weren't drawn into the story. So does that mean that the query kinda...works?

 

Btw, the first 4 agents who said no read the prologue, and the other 3 read the 1st Chapter.. I decided to take Janer Reid's advise and skip the prologue until that partial/full request comes.

 

 


My Query http://agentquerycon...a-high-fantasy/ Let me know if you want me to look at yours. Will happily do so.


#2 lnloft

lnloft

    lnloft

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 136 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 29 November 2017 - 09:52 PM

You know, this is the problem of being in so subjective a field, that even on something like this, there's no hard and firm answer. So much is going to depend on the agent. But I would hazard that for the agents who want you to submit the sample pages along with your query, the query still takes precedence. So if your query just sounds unappealing, they won't even bother looking at your pages.

 

Now, I would also guess that pages can make or break a query that's borderline. If they're a solid "maybe" on it, but the pages look good, then they'll want more, but if the pages don't appeal, they'll pass.

 

Seven rejections isn't time to panic yet, though, especially when you recognize your mistake on five of them. Querying can be a long, arduous process, and having a thick skin is a requisite. However, if you are having doubts about your query, then it might not hurt to revisit it, and see if there is anything you can shore up. Obviously I can't tell you what about your stuff, whether it's the query or the pages, that's not catching the agents' attention, although honestly it's probably a bit of both. But, again, you're not exactly in despair-mode yet with the rejections. And remember, it only takes one agent to make it all worth the while.



#3 WWP

WWP

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, unagented
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:I created and served as editor of a Scottish historical re-enactment newsletter where I wrote several historical articles and some comedy pieces just for fun. After I relinquished the position, I researched and wrote a 20-part series on the Scottish Monarchs, which is on its third run since it was first published over 20 years ago.

Posted 29 November 2017 - 11:00 PM

Due to the reason that there are possibly hundreds of thousands of us hopeful writers out there attempting to entice agents to take a chance on their work, I went into it expecting dozens of rejections (to include those agents queried who use the WRII (will respond if interested) method. With my book I've queried 57 agents. 15 have responded with a rejection. I'm still waiting for the rest. Thankfully I'm rather thick skinned to rejections (that's why I still persist).  I'm quite aware that not everyone has the same tastes as me and all the others who have actually read my book. But all the same, it's not easy getting a no from just one, much less dozens.  Just hang in there. Just as Inloft said, all it takes is one agent to make it all worth while.



#4 Erevos

Erevos

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 91 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationEurope

Posted 30 November 2017 - 08:49 AM

Thank you both for your responses! They give me strength!!

 

Any yes 7 NO isn't a big deal... I was reading today that some of the most successful writers had to endure a year or even more of constant rejections before finally finding that 1 agent..

I guess I need to develop that thick skin everyone's saying  :happy:  Perhaps I'll try and see if there is anything I can do to improve the query...though, it wa such a relief when I finally said, "It's ready."


My Query http://agentquerycon...a-high-fantasy/ Let me know if you want me to look at yours. Will happily do so.


#5 Niambi

Niambi

    Malaika: Fallen

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 371 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, unagented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Journalism

Posted Yesterday, 02:54 PM

Ten/Fifty-seven queries.

One year of rejections.

 

Welcome friend!

 

I was at a good 27 or so rejections before I realized all of my work needed improvement.  And by improvement i don't mean grammar.  I basically had to trash and rewrite my entire work.

 

That was almost two or three years ago.

 

Starting to get some traction now though.

 

Stick in and sadly inloft is correct.  It's such a subjective field that you may never know what anyone thinks or if what they think actually applies.  

 

For me, changing my comps was all it took to start getting requests from agents.  



#6 Nessa

Nessa

    YA Author

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 97 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published, unagented
  • LocationUS Northwest
  • Publishing Experience:THE BRIDGE (Harmony Ink Press)
    Blue Marble Review
    Undergrad lit mags
    Zines

Posted Yesterday, 08:17 PM

Welcome to the game. :) Take it slow, and write another novel while you query.
 
I recommend you query in small rounds.10-15 queries in one batch. Wait until you can close all of them out. If you have no positive responses, take a step back and consider revising your materials. Then send another 10-15 out. Rinse and repeat.
 
There will be times you don't want to revise, and that's fine, but if you reach 40 queries with no requests and no personalized feedback, you should consider getting CPs on your project.
 
Also, be prepared for responses to come after 100+ days. My longest time to get a rejection was 158 days. My longest time to get a full request was 123 days.
 
I also want to highlight what Niambi said about comps. Make sure they are good â€‹comps, published within the past 3 years and not outliers (crazy sales or big screen adaptations).





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users