Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

How much time has to pass?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 A. Wass

A. Wass

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:48 PM

Hey there,

 

So I used to be very active on this site when I was querying back in 2012/2013. Long story short...I got an agent. That book didn't sell. I wrote another one. That one sold in a 2 book deal to a small publisher. I wrote the sequel. The first book was released. Then the publisher had some trouble/legal issues etc. I decided to get the rights reverted back to me and not publish the second book with them. After all that drama, my agent decided to stop being an agent. So that was about a year and half ago. I went back to school and took a break from writing but now that I'm getting back into it I have some questions. 

 

I am currently re writing the first book I wrote that didn't sell but the two that sold are in very solid shape. Is it bad idea to try to query a new agent with the two strong books even though one of them was released (epub only and is no longer available) for a short time? Should I just forgot about those two and focus on querying the first book that I'm rewriting? I'm not sure what the dos and don'ts are in this situation. Any insight would be helpful. Thanks in advance.



#2 Nessa

Nessa

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 190 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented
  • LocationUS West Coast
  • Publishing Experience:THE BRIDGE (Harmony Ink Press)
    Blue Marble Review
    Local & national undergrad lit mags
    Guest blogs
    Zines

Posted 22 December 2017 - 01:34 PM

I suggest popping into Suzie Townsend's Tumblr and leaving an ask about both situations. (Pitching agents with a manuscript that was already submitted to editors, and pitching agents with a manuscript that was published with a defunct publisher.)
 
(suzietownsend.tumblr.com/ask) It might take a while for her to respond. You might also try Emily S. Keyes (esckeyes.tumblr.com/ask).
 
Your situation reminds of A.R. Kahler's. His agent sold MARTYR to Spencer Hill Press and it was published in 2014. In 2017, he published a revised version under the name Alex R. Kahler with Harlequin Teen, and the book was titled RUNEBINDER. The biggest difference in the manuscript was the ending, but for the most part, the books were the same. However, Kahler stuck with his agent of the previous book. I'd say your major concern is signing with a new agent.
 
You might have problems signing with the already-published book--unless if your sales were really good. You're also no longer a debut author, so if your sales were bad, you might want to re-launch with a penname.
 
To be safe, don't do anything with your published books until you get feedback from an agent. Your safest bet is to work on a completely different book.

I love dogs


#3 A. Wass

A. Wass

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Midwest

Posted 22 December 2017 - 02:07 PM

If it is the case that it would be very difficult to sign a agent with those books, would it be a bad idea to self pub those books under a penname? I just love them so much and I want to get them out there somehow. Especially since a lot of friends/family read the first one and always hound me about wanting the sequel.



#4 Nessa

Nessa

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 190 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented
  • LocationUS West Coast
  • Publishing Experience:THE BRIDGE (Harmony Ink Press)
    Blue Marble Review
    Local & national undergrad lit mags
    Guest blogs
    Zines

Posted 22 December 2017 - 02:48 PM

I really would hold onto them. If you sign a new book with an agent and it sells well, you'll have better chances of your already-published books getting picked up.
 
Kiera Cass didn't publish her first book until after she published The Selection series. She's a #1 NYT bestseller, but I think you can still sell those first books if you don't hit #1.
 
If you self-publish under a penname and sell terribly, you'll have to be open with agents about publishing with two names and having poor sales with both. That doesn't look good.
 
A couple days ago, an agent responded to my query asking for sales figures on my debut, which I had published with a small press. She said if the sales were poor, editors might not even consider seeing my new project; if the sales were good, editors would be more open. If you're not a fresh writer, they'll want to work off an established fanbase. Luckily, I can re-launch with my legal name and become debut again. (Look at J.K. Rowling and her "debut" mystery that was published under a penname.)
 
I know you love your works. I love mine too. Especially my first manuscript, which I shelved after too many rejections. But hang onto them. When an agent makes an offer, you can ask about the process for getting those books out.

I love dogs





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users