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#1 Rimbaud

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 09:26 PM

I believe that when one writes a query letter one is supposed to ask the recipient if he or she wants a composition pertaining to a certain issue.

 

However, I have already written many of the items I long to see published.   

 

I have written several hundred pages of nonfiction essays (pertaining to politics, sexuality, aesthetics and more), one novel, one hundred completed poems (three hundred if you add those poems which are not finished) and memoirs.

 

Only about 6 of my pieces have been published.  Only one of the 6 resulted in the tender of money. 

 

In any event, I am confused:  I suppose I could simply tell the agent that I have already written a piece on subject X, but would that hurt my chances, i.e., would the agent infer that I write, before getting positive feedback from an agent, because I am so desperate for recognition. 

 

However, I fear that if I were to ask the agent  if he would like a composition on X, the agent would summarily dismiss me from consideration because  I am virtually unknown

 

In any event, I believe the nonfiction essays, the memoirs and the novel must all be offered via the query letter process.

 

Should I

 

A) Tell them that I have already written the item

 

B) Tell them that I would like to write the item

or

C) Tell them that the item is on the verge of completion.

 

I thank you in advance for the rendition of informed opinions and recommendations

 

 



#2 Nessa

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 09:54 PM

Novel: Assuming this is fiction, the work should be complete and edited to the best of your ability. (Though not required, it is highly recommended that the novel be critiqued by fellow writers/readers.)
 
Memoirs/Non-fiction: You write a proposal, so the work doesn't have to complete. Here's a general "How To" from the Bradford Literary Agency. Here's another take on non-fiction querying: https://www.janefrie...ers-nonfiction/
 
Regarding your A, B, and C situations in the context of querying a novel, you don't want to tell that you're planning to write so-and-so or have a bunch of unpublished works. In your bio, you'll want to list your publications, regardless of whether you were paid.

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#3 lnloft

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 09:55 PM

I'm a little confused about what you're asking, but if you are querying your novel, then it MUST be complete before querying. Whether you are a newbie just starting out or J. K. Rowling looking for a new agent, you will not impress an agent by querying an incomplete novel.

 

However, if you are trying to get a non-fiction book published, general convention is to not have that complete. Agents and editors often want to have a say in what goes in. For that, you want to have sample pages and an outline of where the rest of the book should go ready to send out. So if you have already completed a non-fiction book, I say use that to inform how you write your outline, and be prepared to potentially do some rewrites, cut some chapters, or add chapters, depending on what the agent says.

 

Hope this answers your question.


Nothing to reciprocate on right now; I'm off in the query trenches.


#4 Graeme_Smith

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 11:06 PM

Lord (or indeed Lady - my apologies if I err (blush)) Rimbaud

I believe you may be con fusing a 'Proposal' and a 'Query'.

Proposals are for non-fiction. In essence they are written prior to (or as though prior to) writing a non-fiction piece. The intention is to initiate a commission to write. As a general rule, a Proposal should identify the subject matter, why you are a viable author for that subject matter, possibly show market gaps that would be interested in the material and target audiences. For example, I might try to send a Publisher a Proposal for my informative work on mental health and aging I might not get very far - the only connection I have with the field is, on occasion, embarrassing senior moments where I have to go upstairs three times to work out why I came downstairs. Which is a problem, since i live in a condo and don't actually have stairs (blush). On the other hand, if I had two Stanleys and a Bowis, and held the Chair of Psychiatry at UCLA (which I definitely don't - not even for the real occupant to sit down in  :-P), I might have more chance of receiving a commission.

Queries, on the other hand, are for fiction. A Query is for completed works only, and intended to show a prospective Agent, or indeed Publisher that:

 

1: You have a story

2: You can write

3: You know your audience

and

4: That it's something they think (this is the hard part, since most of us don't seem telepathic) they can sell.

 

The last one is, I think, particularly interesting. Agents (and indeed Publishers) aren't necessarily looking for The Next Great Work. They're looking for The Next Great Paycheck. So knowing your market, your audience and having a view of likely sales can be extremely useful. Convincing the Agent or Publisher of same is, however, a Black Art - and if you ever find a surefire way to complete the exercise, you'll be rich as Creosote (heh - with apologies to the late and great Mr Pterry Pratchett :-)   ).

Is that of any help?



#5 Rimbaud

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 09:26 PM

I am so sorry this is long.  Plesae read it. 

 

 

 

I thank you all for your responses.  I don't want to be a pain in the butt, but I have more questions.

 

I especially have specific questions for Smith, and anyone who might be able to comment, who made some very important points. 

 

I suppose my questions .are a bit complex because I started this thread asking about sending queries for three different genres. 

 

1) Non Fiction

2) Memoirs

3) One novel

 

I will address ONLY Non Fiction in this post.  Smith made  a critical point:

 

"Proposals are for non-fiction. In essence they are written prior to (or as though prior to) writing a non-fiction piece. The intention is to initiate a commission to write. As a general rule, a Proposal should identify the subject matter, why you are a viable author for that subject matter, possibly show market gaps that would be interested in the material and target audiences."

 

This presents two problems for me:  A) I have already written the piece and B) By most standards I would not be considered qualified to render judgments or ideas on various phenomena, whether it pertain to scholarship or aesthetics or politics etc.  (I will address the issue of qualifications in a  moment)

 

If I understand Smith correctly, he contends that when one submits a proposal, one tries get a "commission to write" the piece.

Are you, Smith,  saying that one whose proposal is accepted WOULD GET PAID while writing the piece.  In my case, I would not expect any money while writing the piece as it is already written (I realize it may have to undergo revisions and much additional work depending upon the agent's interests but I would forfeit the write to any money before it is completed.)  

 

In a sense, I am offering to send him  a completed manuscript for free. 

 

The issue of qualifications:  I do not have Phds in Politics, philosophy, psychology etc.  (I do have a law degree, and I think that can make one a fine judge of extra-legal phenomena because we lawyers are taught to think CRITICALLY and AGGRESSIVELY.

(I hope to G-d I don't sound like insufferable snot.)

  I think that very often people in academia are so busy being passive receptacles for the dogmas of their fields that they, paradoxically, muck up their fields.  

 

Also, if one has spent  one's life learning theory A, spending money to be skilled in employing theory A, and making money by practicing theory A one will be AFRAID TO CONSIDER criticisms of theory A as that may reveal that one's life work was invalid and perhaps an utter waste.  Consider: 

 

a) In the days of Ptolemy, the expert astronomers said that the sun revolved around the earth, and anyone outside of that cabal of presumed experts, who dared to voice a contrary positon, was shunned  and scorned.

 

b)  In the 19th century, Pasteur was far removed from the leading medical elites in Paris.  When he said that surgeons should keep clean, and sterilize things, because dirt contained microbes, the medical elites lampooned him as a quack.  The medical elites did not want to admit a theory which showed that they were killing their patients with dirt.

 

c)There are so many more instances I wouldn't no where to begin.  Just a couple more:  i) People used to think psychoanalysts were experts in healing mental illness, but the Eysenck study showed the neurotics who DO NOT go to therapy had a two thirds chance of getting better over time while only 44 percent of those who became patients got better.  ii) In the early sixties, the experts said that people who believed that zinc was a necessary nutrient were stupid health food faddists, but they changed their tune when autopsies showed that sterile men did not have zinc in their testacies and that fertile men did have zinc.

 

IN ANY EVENT, maybe even though my qualifications are decidedly questionable, per the orthodox viewpoints (which as stated above I tend to disagree with), maybe they will respond to a proposal because, as stated above, I will not ask for any money beforehand. 

 

Am I right about this?  For my non fiction stuff, 

WOULD IT BE WORTHWHILE to send a proposal in which I say, a) I am not asking for a dime while I am writing this as it is already written and b) perhaps you will be interested in this even though my qualifications may seem dubious because I will not be paid prior to the time you accept this.

 

I hope my questions are clear. 

 

Thank you very much for your astute observations.  



#6 lnloft

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 10:39 PM

So, I'm no expert on non-fiction publication, but I wouldn't be too worried about having a completed manuscript. Again, just use what you have already written to help you create your proposal, and be prepared to make plenty more revisions later.

 

Being qualified to write a non-fiction book doesn't necessarily mean you have to have a higher degree. It just means you have to have some sort of experience. If you want to write a book on astronomy, for instance, you could be a professor of astronomy, but you could also just be someone spends a ton of free time on their telescope and now you want to write a book about introducing people to the basics of star-gazing. However, just saying, "I've read lots of books on astronomy," won't give you the credentials. Thinking about myself, I spent my childhood living in several different countries and moving around a lot. If I wanted to write a book about how that sort of thing impacts children, I think that would give me some credentials for it, even though I've never studied it, but it would a starting point of personal experience, as long as I was also contacting professionals for their feedback. I'm not really sure why you're citing examples like Pasteur and Ptolemy, because their situations are not yours (if Pasteur were modern-day, trying to publish a book, he would have the credentials, he just might not be believed), but the point is that life experience can count as credentials, if you're writing the right kind of book. If you're writing a book about the intricate details of black holes, you probably want an advanced physics degree. But as two real world examples, my cousin has a book about her experiences as an NCAA athlete, and her father has a book about his experience in Iraq. And the only credentials they needed for that were that they lived it.

 

Now, onto another part of your question, as I understand it, you are not being paid to write. You are sending a proposal to an agent, who then will take your book to a publisher and make a deal with them, just as it would be with fiction. So your whole thing of a free manuscript doesn't hold.

 

If you want some more resources on getting non-fiction published, you can read up on it here:

http://blog.nathanbr...n-book-proposal

There's also a couple books you can read about it. I obviously haven't read them myself, but I hear they are quite helpful:

https://michaelhyatt...-book-proposal/

https://www.amazon.c...ASIN=1582975787


Nothing to reciprocate on right now; I'm off in the query trenches.


#7 Rimbaud

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 11:37 PM

I thank everyone for their good points.  

 

However, I want to FOCUS on one item that I mentioned in my last post, the fourth post in this thread I initiated.

 

With respect to NON FICTION, one of the posters said that I really want to send out a PROPOSAL as opposed to a QUERY.

 

If the publisher and/or agent is interested in the proposal, the writer will be PAID as he is working on the non fiction book, a poster seemed to suggest.

 

However, I have books that are already completed, or close to completion (I don't want to discuss it now as it would detract from the issues I want to address in this e mail).

 

Because they are already completed, I would not ask for any money while I am working on the book (And I realize the material might require a lot more work on my part especially if the agent wants me to stress or elaborate points my work kept mum about) 

 

So would it be appropriate to say, in  a proposal letter, among other things:

 

"My book, or my eventual book as I might substantially modify what I have written to suit your needs, is already written.  Accordingly, I am not asking for the tender of any money whatsoever, while I am modifying it, working with editors and preforming all tasks prior to the manuscipt's finalization.":

 

OF COURSE, this would be absurd if agents and or publishers do not tender funds while the book is stilll being written.  



#8 KitCampbell

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 12:54 PM

The money paid toward a book proposal works like an advance for a fiction book. So, let's say you send a publisher your proposal, and they decide they'd like you to write the book. They might offer you $5000 at signing, with another $5000 paid upon the receipt of the manuscript. If the book is already written, it just means you're going to get your two payments closer together. So you can think of it being paid to write the book if you'd like, but whether the book exists or not already doesn't factor into it. The publisher is willing to pay $10000 for that book, and whether they pay you in installments or all at once isn't really important.

 

I think it would be inappropriate to include a line about payment in the proposal itself. 

 

I'm not sure you would even want to state the completeness of the book. It being written already might actually be a deterrent if the publisher/agent/whoever wants major changes to the proposal before they'll accept the book. 



#9 Rimbaud

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Kit Cambell, thanks for addressing the precise issues I raised. 

 

You said, among other things:

 

"They might offer you $5000 at signing, with another $5000 paid upon the receipt of the manuscript."

 

Questions:

 

1) What transpires at signing?  Is it an agreement in which the agent agrees to pay you x amount of money 

to work on and complete the book (And other terms of the agreement are included)

 

2)   Since the foregoing quoted language says that the manuscript will be tendered at a later date, doesn't this mean that the WRITER HAS GOTTEN MONEY BEFORE he has given them a complete book

 

HOW THIS RELATES TO MY SITUATION:  As I said, I have stuff that is completed.  I know that can present a problem because they have their own ideas re what sort of a book they want to turn out.   However, there is a sweetener:  They don't have to pay me while I am writing the book because it is completed. 

 

The idea I am trying to convey is this:   Yes, I know it is already completed, but a) I will be willing to make radical revisions (if I agree with them and if it does not offend my ideology or philosophy) and, unlike many (or is it most or all) writers who are working on the basis of proposals, I will not take a dime until you "accept" the manuscript.   

 

If my question is unclear, please ask me to clarify my question.  



#10 Graeme_Smith

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 07:41 PM

Lord Rimbaud (OK, so I'm guessing, but I'll stick my flag in the sand on Lord as opposed to Lady (blush))

 

I'll try to comment ('answer' would imply I think I, like, know stuff and should be listened to. Heck, even my _cat_ doesn;t _listen_ to me! (blushes again) in order of your questions. If I mess up, I'll at least try to be vaguely coherent. I'll probably mess up, but hey, my wife tells me I'm trying, so it's worth a shot!

 

"This presents two problems for me:"

 

OK - let's take a run at them sir :-).

 

"A) I have already written the piece"

 

That's not actually a problem. Whether you've written the piece/ book or not, I think the approach is the same. For non-fiction you:

Identify your market

Identify which Publishers/ Agents (generally non-fiction goes more often direct to Publishers than fiction does) play in that playground

Ask them if they'd be interested (the Proposal). Again, it doesn't matter if the book is written or not, any more than it matters if a fiction writer writes a book she/ he doesn't intend to market, but changes their mind later. Apart from anything else, the very act of writing is one of the best training plans there is.

 

 

"B) By most standards I would not be considered qualified to render judgments or ideas on various phenomena, whether it pertain to scholarship or aesthetics or politics etc"

 

This is where it gets, to me at least, both more interesting and harder. Because, whether you write the most amazing books on earth may not matter. Yes, I really said that. Or rather I didn't - someone I wish I could remember, could find the article, did. It was an Agent, talking about fiction (but I think her point applies equally to non-fiction). I can only remember she was female, but she said that when she talked to authors, a lot of them thought her biggest problem must be the bad writing she was sent every day. Which, she said,wasn't true. A lot of what she was sent was _great_ writing. But The Next Great Work of Literature wasn't what she needed, wasn't what she was looking for. Because if she was going to invest a year, two years of her life in a book, she didn't need Great Literature, she needed dollars and cents to put food on her family's table. She needed Great Sales not, at least not necessarily, Great Literature. And, she said, so did Publishers. _They_ wanted bread on the table as well. So what she would look for was reasons a submission would break sales records.

I think that's equally true for non-fiction.

So what makes a book sell? Well, if I knew that, I'd be rich. But a number of things can help. A new book by me on Super-String Theory wouldn't attract as much attention as exactly the same book by Stephen Hawking. Why not? Well, most folks in the field know Mr Hawking knows what he's talking about. Me? Not so much, Super String Theory or Knitting String Theory. So being respected in a field can help a lot for non-fiction. But here's a thing - if (at the risk of being sued for taking her name in vain) Kim Kardashian released a new book about diets, it would sell. Oh, sorry. I mean, it would SELL. Whether or not she's a qualified dietician and nutritionist. It would _SELL_. Why? Because she's famous ,already has a defined audience. If you can show a Publisher you have one of those, you're a long way forward (even if you're not a Kadashian). A viral video of a dog who likes your guitar music, hates it when you stop?

 

https://duckduckgo.c...iai=KBluUZ4NnZg

 

That's a hair short of fourteen MILLION views right there. That's an audience. That's a hook.

But we can't all play the guitar, never mind dog-a-liciously. But we might have a web page, a social media site - 'Fifty Shades of Grey' was, at least in part, picked up because the writer had a bunch of folks on a site who were avidly reading her stuff.

So, cutting an already long set of words short, one of the questions you have to be able to answer for a Publisher, especially with a Proposal, is - 'why would people buy this book? Read this book?' It doesn't matter what the answer is - but having one you can show a Publisher helps.

 

 

"Are you, Smith,  saying that one whose proposal is accepted WOULD GET PAID while writing the piece"

 

Er - nope. Sorry :-(. Or not generally. Or probably not. Or maybe. What you get is a form of agreement that says 'sure, go write it. Or send it if you've already got it. But send it direct to me, and if it's good enough, we'll put it out there - _then_ pay you $Thismuch.' If you're really well known, or the best in your field, you _may_ get paid for the writing exercise itself, but not generally.

 

 

"Am I right about this?  For my non fiction stuff, 

WOULD IT BE WORTHWHILE to send a proposal in which I say, a) I am not asking for a dime while I am writing this as it is already written and b) perhaps you will be interested in this even though my qualifications may seem dubious because I will not be paid prior to the time you accept this."

 

It depends. On what? On how you answer the question they won;t ask you up front, because they'll expect you to answer it without being asked. To answer, in a way they believe, why people would pick _your_ book off the shelf, hand over their dollars, _Read_ it - and tell their friends to do the same. Whether that's fame, dog videos, expertise in the field, a series of articles on web sites where people actually start discussing your thoughts in the comments, and in large numbers - true, false or marketing, you need an answer.

 

So how does that feel as a start? Not just to Lord RImbaud, but to others here as well, who likely know a thousand times more about the field than I do? Over to y'all... :-)



#11 Emily804

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 01:59 AM

http://www.writersdi...n-book-proposal

 

See #5 in the article.

 

Even if the agent asked for no revisions you would still be expected to work on a marketing plan.

 

Don't mention that you don't want the money. I'm sure plenty of people write their entire book before sending out the proposal. While having a finished manuscript may make things easier for you as a writer, it doesn't change the process that publishers and agents go through. Just focus on describing your book, and getting all of the elements necessary for a book proposal in there. Don't worry about the money. If they want to give you some early, what's the harm?


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#12 Springfield

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 04:04 PM

I thank everyone for their good points.  

 

However, I want to FOCUS on one item that I mentioned in my last post, the fourth post in this thread I initiated.

 

With respect to NON FICTION, one of the posters said that I really want to send out a PROPOSAL as opposed to a QUERY.

 

If the publisher and/or agent is interested in the proposal, the writer will be PAID as he is working on the non fiction book, a poster seemed to suggest.

 

However, I have books that are already completed, or close to completion (I don't want to discuss it now as it would detract from the issues I want to address in this e mail).

 

Because they are already completed, I would not ask for any money while I am working on the book (And I realize the material might require a lot more work on my part especially if the agent wants me to stress or elaborate points my work kept mum about) 

 

So would it be appropriate to say, in  a proposal letter, among other things:

 

"My book, or my eventual book as I might substantially modify what I have written to suit your needs, is already written.  Accordingly, I am not asking for the tender of any money whatsoever, while I am modifying it, working with editors and preforming all tasks prior to the manuscipt's finalization.":

 

No. No one cares. Payments work how they work. It's not like 'I'll work at your firm for free, to show you how valuable an employee I am!' Payments are structured the way they are, regardless.

 

OF COURSE, this would be absurd if agents and or publishers do not tender funds while the book is stilll being written.  

 

They often do, for non-fic, but see above, it's immaterial. 

 

Kit Cambell, thanks for addressing the precise issues I raised. 

 

You said, among other things:

 

"They might offer you $5000 at signing, with another $5000 paid upon the receipt of the manuscript."

 

Questions:

 

1) What transpires at signing?  Is it an agreement in which the agent agrees to pay you x amount of money 

to work on and complete the book (And other terms of the agreement are included)

 

Agents pay you nothing, ever. You pay agents a portion of your take from sales -- nothing before.

 

Signing with an agent is an agreement of representation. Agents sell manuscripts, completed or partial, to publishers.

 

2)   Since the foregoing quoted language says that the manuscript will be tendered at a later date, doesn't this mean that the WRITER HAS GOTTEN MONEY BEFORE he has given them a complete book

 

HOW THIS RELATES TO MY SITUATION:  As I said, I have stuff that is completed.  I know that can present a problem because they have their own ideas re what sort of a book they want to turn out.   However, there is a sweetener:  They don't have to pay me while I am writing the book because it is completed. 

 

The idea I am trying to convey is this:   Yes, I know it is already completed, but a) I will be willing to make radical revisions (if I agree with them and if it does not offend my ideology or philosophy) and, unlike many (or is it most or all) writers who are working on the basis of proposals, I will not take a dime until you "accept" the manuscript.   

 

If my question is unclear, please ask me to clarify my question.  

 

See above, this has nothing to do with anything. 



#13 Rimbaud

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 01:24 AM

Emily:  You said that you are sure that plenty of people have already written the book at the time they are sending out a proposal for a book. 

 

Should one be honest in one's lelter and tell the agent that you have a proposal for a book and that you have already written the book.  Should you append something along these lines:  although it is written I am not at all averse to modifying it oddles of times to suit the ever-changing needs and desires of my imperious agent. 

 

Man, it is such hard work.  In one of his poems, Allen Ginsburg says, and I quote:

"Why can't I just go into a supermarket and get what I want because of my good looks."

 

When I am in an Allenish mood, which is unfortunately becoming more common, I feel like walking into the offices of agents,showing them psychiatric tests which said I was a genius and dreamy sort of maniac, and demanding a contract and some money to piss on a celebration right then and there. 

 

(I am getting dizzy from the sleeping pill so pardon any excessive rambunctiousness here)  



#14 Springfield

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 11:34 PM

Emily:  You said that you are sure that plenty of people have already written the book at the time they are sending out a proposal for a book. 

 

Should one be honest in one's lelter and tell the agent that you have a proposal for a book and that you have already written the book.  Should you append something along these lines:  although it is written I am not at all averse to modifying it oddles of times to suit the ever-changing needs and desires of my imperious agent. 

 

Man, it is such hard work.  In one of his poems, Allen Ginsburg says, and I quote:

"Why can't I just go into a supermarket and get what I want because of my good looks."

 

When I am in an Allenish mood, which is unfortunately becoming more common, I feel like walking into the offices of agents,showing them psychiatric tests which said I was a genius and dreamy sort of maniac, and demanding a contract and some money to piss on a celebration right then and there. 

 

(I am getting dizzy from the sleeping pill so pardon any excessive rambunctiousness here)  

 

You send a query, you have a proposal ready. It doesn't matter for purposes of the proposal if it's finished or not; the proposal will look the same, basically.

 

No, don't sound like a smartass, and no, don't specify you'll change things if they're not etc. 

 

First, you will be asked to change things; I guarantee. I don't know of anyone who has made it past agents and editors without those people asking for any changes. Second, people assume you're professional. 



#15 Rimbaud

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 11:33 PM

First, thanks to everyone,

 

I am having computer problems so if this e mail is a bit messed up, do be quick to indict the tyranny of technology and to exculpate your truly

 

 

Unfortunately, I never run out of questions
 

1) Nessa, the first responder, referred me to a web site beginning with “JaneFri…”  That web page had a snippet of info that made me more bewildered than ever:

 

“If you’ve written a book proposal (and you probably should), then your query letter is often a more condensed version of your book proposal’s overview or summary—those first 500 words (or first one to three proposal pages) should summarize the most important and salable qualities of your book.” 

 

Is this web site suggesting that one might send an agent BOTH a query letter and a book proposal.  I thought  for memoirs and nonfiction it was a book proposal and sample chapters.  Period.

 

2)  I Was quite startled upon learning, from some of the responses, and the webpages they referred me to, that I will have to have a marketing plan.  One of the web pages said that one could get a publicist to get an audience or platform.    

 

Where can I get a publicist?  How much money are we talking about?  I am a techno Neanderthal so I don’t have much in the way of a platform. 



#16 Springfield

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 01:44 AM

First, thanks to everyone,

 

I am having computer problems so if this e mail is a bit messed up, do be quick to indict the tyranny of technology and to exculpate your truly

 

 

Unfortunately, I never run out of questions
 

1) Nessa, the first responder, referred me to a web site beginning with “JaneFri…”  That web page had a snippet of info that made me more bewildered than ever:

 

“If you’ve written a book proposal (and you probably should), then your query letter is often a more condensed version of your book proposal’s overview or summary—those first 500 words (or first one to three proposal pages) should summarize the most important and salable qualities of your book.” 

 

Is this web site suggesting that one might send an agent BOTH a query letter and a book proposal.  I thought  for memoirs and nonfiction it was a book proposal and sample chapters.  Period.

 

As in my post just above this, for non-fic, you need a query and a proposal. Memoirs are queried like fiction, just query. 

 

2)  I Was quite startled upon learning, from some of the responses, and the webpages they referred me to, that I will have to have a marketing plan.  One of the web pages said that one could get a publicist to get an audience or platform.    

 

Where can I get a publicist?  How much money are we talking about?  I am a techno Neanderthal so I don’t have much in the way of a platform. 

 

Part of a proposal is the marketing plan. A proposal is not a small deal; it's a large packet of information. If you don't know what goes in one, I suggest you do some research into that first. You're not going to develop a platform by way of a publicist. Platforms are either through expertise or following or a combination.



#17 Rimbaud

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 10:42 PM

Springfield, I appreciate your info.  

 

1) QUERY v. PROPOSAL v BOTH

 

You said, in your last post, that  for non fiction one should submit both a proposal and a query.  Some other people on this and other sites say nonfiction gets only a proposal and that queries are strictly for fiction.

 

If I were a busy agent with ten thousand things to read, I would much prefer a writer who would fuse it all into one document.   I guess I will have to keep reading and researching to determine the RIGHT AND PROPER ROUTE.  

 

2) Lights, Camera, Action:  Getting a Publicist

 

You told me I don't need a publicist.  However, a publicist could assist me in developing a web site or blog or stuff on the internet which, if I am fortunate, might get tons of views.  And from what I have read, when one discusses a marketing plan one should be able to refer to ones platform, e.g., how many people follow your blog.  I really want a publicist.  IF ANYONE KNOWS WHERE OR HOW TO LOOK FOR ONE, PLEASE ADVISE.

 

I can think of plenty of things to write and to say (If I do audio visual presentations), but, as I said, I am a techno neanderthal need assistance in putting the stuff together



#18 Springfield

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:50 PM

Springfield, I appreciate your info.  

 

1) QUERY v. PROPOSAL v BOTH

 

You said, in your last post, that  for non fiction one should submit both a proposal and a query.  Some other people on this and other sites say nonfiction gets only a proposal and that queries are strictly for fiction.

 

If I were a busy agent with ten thousand things to read, I would much prefer a writer who would fuse it all into one document.   I guess I will have to keep reading and researching to determine the RIGHT AND PROPER ROUTE.  

 

I did not say that. You don't submit both. you HAVE both. You query people, and if they're interested, they will ask you to send your proposal. Some agents may ask for a proposal up front, not a query (and there may be some who ask for both up front, but it's not usual), as will some houses, as some houses take unsolicited non-fic. submissions. 

 

 

2) Lights, Camera, Action:  Getting a Publicist

 

You told me I don't need a publicist.  However, a publicist could assist me in developing a web site or blog or stuff on the internet which, if I am fortunate, might get tons of views.  And from what I have read, when one discusses a marketing plan one should be able to refer to ones platform, e.g., how many people follow your blog.  I really want a publicist.  IF ANYONE KNOWS WHERE OR HOW TO LOOK FOR ONE, PLEASE ADVISE.

 

I can think of plenty of things to write and to say (If I do audio visual presentations), but, as I said, I am a techno neanderthal need assistance in putting the stuff together

 

Again, you're not going to develop a platform by way of a publicist. 

 

When are you thinking of querying?

 

If you start a blog TODAY, and get a publicist TOMORROW, and the publicist buys you 100,000 views a week, you'll have no content on the blog to support that. You'd have to have had a blog for a long time, with lots of content, and numbers that grew over time, or some viral event, for that to make sense. 

 

'I get 100,000 views a week on my blog that's a month old,' is not a platform. It just says 'I bought bot/spider trolls.'



#19 Rimbaud

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 12:04 AM

FIRST, allow me to implore readers, please answer the questions I posed.  

 

Now I will respond to the last comment by Sprinfield:

 

I have plenty of stuff that I could put on a blog now.  But as I write this, another problem comes to mind.   Much of what I have

consists of non fiction and memoir.  If I were to put it on line now, where it could be viewed for free, why would a publisher like tto buy my stuff at a later date.  



#20 Springfield

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 12:09 AM

They won't. Don't publish something you hope to have trade published.






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