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Do criminal investigators or Detectives have badges, if so where do they keep them?


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#1 mojicanpuertorican

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 11:56 AM

I'm writing out a scene and I'd like to know accurately how to portray this. He's a criminal investigator and he's getting his badge taken away for something. Anyone know some details on if they even have badges? Where they're kept during work? Also, can they get fired for not investigating a case well? Let's say he believes there are some paranormal elements and wants to investigate, it's not his department and no one believes him, but he keeps doing this anyway. 

 

I'll appreciate the input!



#2 giffordmac

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 12:32 PM

If you're talking about a police detective, he would have a badge. Sometimes they keep it in a wallet-type folder, sometimes it's clipped to their belt, sometimes worn on a lanyard around the neck. If you're talking about a specific city, you might want to inquire with the local PD, because I think the way it's displayed is up to the department. Most cops, I understand, put their badge away with their gun/s when they're off-duty.

 

If you're talking about a federal investigator, mostly it's the wallet-type folder.

 

If you're talking about a private detective, all I know is they have to carry their license with them while they're investigating.

 

I'm confused by your last question. Is it that he didn't solve a case, or that he's trying to solve a case he's been pulled off of? I don't think the first scenario would cause him to be fired, unless his "closed case" stats are much lower than the norm. If he's been pulled off a case and continues to investigate it, that could be seen as a failure to follow orders and disciplinary action might be taken.

 

Hope this helps!


“We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” ― Elie Wiesel

 

~~~

 

 

 

 


#3 mojicanpuertorican

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 02:08 PM

@giffordmac

 

Thanks so much for the info, helps me play out the scene better. But i'd like to ask, what's the difference between a police detective and federal investigator? Is it specific duties that differentiate them?

 

And as for the last question, The story is the murder of a girl, but the protagonist who is a normal detective, something paranormal killed her, and there's things he's seen that make him believe this. The police think he's being ridiculous, but he abandons the "regular investigation" not question people, not gathering evidence, rather going his own route and studying the paranormal thing. Because he's abandoned it,also his brother is accused of the murder, I wonder if that's enough for him to lose his job. Also, they warned him ahead to stop investigating the paranormal stuff and focus back on the real investigation. 



#4 giffordmac

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 02:50 PM

A police detective works for the municipality, whether it be a city, township or county (though in my experience, counties are usually under the auspices of a sheriff & have deputies rather than detectives). A detective might also work for the local DA's office.

 

A federal investigator is someone who works for the Justice Department (incl the FBI), Homeland Security, CIA, Treasury Dep't etc. Their duties/areas of investigation are strictly defined by their charter (what Congress has authorized them to do.) They may coordinate with the local police; for instance, the FBI is normally called in for kidnappings. But the crime is usually first investigated by the local police, who make the determination of whether or not to call in the Feds.

 

If a detective disobeys a direct order from his superiors, it is likely he'd be terminated for dereliction of duty or insubordination, especially if he refuses more than one order. Most PDs would have a procedure that needs to be followed (eg: verbal notice, written notice, firing), so that an officer has a chance to make good. The more times he refuses the order, the more likely it is he'll be fired.

 

Sorry it took so long to respond, but I'm here about once a month, as you see. I've set up a "watch" on this thread -- if you have any more questions, I'd be happy to help as much as I can. My father-in-law was a police lieutenant, so I'm speaking from a small-town experience.

 

Hope this helps!


“We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” ― Elie Wiesel

 

~~~

 

 

 

 





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