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Is New Adult dead?

New Adult Fiction

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#1 mcnamml

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 01:37 PM

Ok....So I've read all of the posts on this forum concerning YA vs NA vs A. And I've read just about every article online concerning NA fiction. NA fiction is fiction that deals with themes of (big surprise) "emerging adults". Navigating college and life after. Tone is similar to YA with older female protagonists. All in all it's a cross over genre between YA and A for mostly college-aged females.

 

All that being said. Should writer's even use NA to describe their genre? It seems to generate a lot of disapproval from agents/ publishers. Is one shooting themselves in the foot by calling anything "New Adult"?

 

For example: Novel with a college aged protagonist navigating life but in a sci-fi environment.

Even though main themes are NA, should the author just go with Sci-fi vs NA Sci-fi (more accurate) to avoid rejections based on the genre class alone.

 

Additional example: College aged protagonist, hot steamy romances etc. Should author just categorize as Romance instead of New Adult Romance.

 

And last but not least, can writers who fall into the "New Adult" category just simply call their work adult (i.e., adult Sci-Fi, adult Mystery) even if themes of New Adult fiction are present? Prior to the phrase being coined in 2009 is this where that type of work fell?

 

As you can see New Adult gives me a lot of angst. I particularly think its a great way to identify the age of the audience but it seems to hold many negative connotations.



#2 Nessa

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 04:07 PM

My understanding:
 
NA is a marketing term for college-aged protagonists (usually females) in a romance-heavy plot. NA can also be called "Adult with crossover potential for a YA audience."
 
If you're pitching to agents, you probably will be shooting yourself in the foot. (Unless if the agent is specifically asking for NA.)
 
Your best bet is to stick with "Adult," even if you're in the romance scene. NA isn't very successful in the traditional publishing sphere (the exception being authors who are already established).

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#3 Emily804

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 07:57 PM

Actually, I was under the impression that New Adult is a growing genre, despite the fact that it is fairly new (lol, new adult is a new genre). According to Wikipedia, it's target audience is anywhere from 18 to 30, which is a pretty broad range. Found nothing about it only being for females.  :smile: 


Query Compatibility YA sci-fi: http://agentquerycon...lity-ya-sci-fi/


#4 Nessa

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 09:38 PM

I've yet to hear from a literary agent that NA is a growing genre. It's new, but it hasn't done well.
 
Suzie Townsend answered a question about NA on her blog last month. Here's what she had to say: "Right now I would not use the term NA. It’s just not working in traditional publishing right now and I don’t think it’s the right move in terms of selling yourself and your project to agents. I do love NA personally but I cannot sell it to a publisher and that’s what I’m thinking about when I read queries. I’d recommend calling it adult with crossover potential."
 
There certainly are agents looking for NA, but overall, NA is not sturdy enough as a genre to sell in traditional publishing. "Adult with crossover potential" is the safest thing you can do until NA finds its legs.

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#5 Springfield

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:42 PM

As a doornail.

 

Ok....So I've read all of the posts on this forum concerning YA vs NA vs A. And I've read just about every article online concerning NA fiction. NA fiction is fiction that deals with themes of (big surprise) "emerging adults". Navigating college and life after. Tone is similar to YA with older female protagonists. All in all it's a cross over genre between YA and A for mostly college-aged females.

 

All that being said. Should writer's even use NA to describe their genre? It seems to generate a lot of disapproval from agents/ publishers. Is one shooting themselves in the foot by calling anything "New Adult"?

 

For example: Novel with a college aged protagonist navigating life but in a sci-fi environment.

Even though main themes are NA, should the author just go with Sci-fi vs NA Sci-fi (more accurate) to avoid rejections based on the genre class alone.

 

Additional example: College aged protagonist, hot steamy romances etc. Should author just categorize as Romance instead of New Adult Romance.

 

And last but not least, can writers who fall into the "New Adult" category just simply call their work adult (i.e., adult Sci-Fi, adult Mystery) even if themes of New Adult fiction are present? Prior to the phrase being coined in 2009 is this where that type of work fell?

 

As you can see New Adult gives me a lot of angst. I particularly think its a great way to identify the age of the audience but it seems to hold many negative connotations.

 

Yeah, anything past YA is just adult.

 

 

My understanding:
 
NA is a marketing term for college-aged protagonists (usually females) in a romance-heavy plot. NA can also be called "Adult with crossover potential for a YA audience."
 
If you're pitching to agents, you probably will be shooting yourself in the foot. (Unless if the agent is specifically asking for NA.)
 
Your best bet is to stick with "Adult," even if you're in the romance scene. NA isn't very successful in the traditional publishing sphere (the exception being authors who are already established).

 

 

Agreed, esp with the bolded.

 

Actually, I was under the impression that New Adult is a growing genre, despite the fact that it is fairly new (lol, new adult is a new genre). According to Wikipedia, it's target audience is anywhere from 18 to 30, which is a pretty broad range. Found nothing about it only being for females.  :smile:

 

It was never a genre, it's a marketing category, and it's a goner. It was supposed to be the big new thing, never got any traction outside of some soft erotica-type romances, and was consigned to the scrap heap of publishing history. 







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