Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

British Style Children's Lit


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 29 November 2011 - 07:46 PM

I'm conducting a little experiment.

If I were to say a novel was "British-style Children's Lit" what would that mean to you?

I'll tell you why I ask after a few responses.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#2 Lucy

Lucy

    Veteran Member

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 677 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging
  • LocationUS Northeast

Posted 29 November 2011 - 08:50 PM

So are we talking Edith Nesbit-esque? Because if so, that sounds fabulous.

#3 anticipa

anticipa

    Ant, the Quixotic Query Quibbler

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,981 posts
  • Literary Status:agented
  • LocationUS Southeast
  • Publishing Experience:A piece of flash fiction in Bad Austen, published Nov. 2011 by Adams Media.

Posted 29 November 2011 - 08:57 PM

Dang, I'm not sure. I was practically raised on Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl, but I can't see any similarities between the two, to be honest. :blush: Not getting it.

Is it something having to do with the sort of frank expository voice some British authors have? :blink:

© this post is a riley redgate production

reports of my demise are greatly exaggerated.

i blog! i tweet!


#4 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 29 November 2011 - 09:23 PM

Just looking for what the phrase might mean to you. There's no wrong answer.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#5 Paul Dillon

Paul Dillon

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,222 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published, unagented
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:Debut novel published by Mark Williams international Digital Publishing July 2012

Posted 29 November 2011 - 11:05 PM

RS,

I am British and was once a child, but "British-style Children's Lit" means nothing to me.

#6 C. Taylor

C. Taylor

    Subsisting on Pots of Tea

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,259 posts
  • Literary Status:published, self-published, agented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:I'm a NY Times and USA Today bestselling author writing under the pen name, Cali MacKay and write fun and steamy contemporary romances, in addition to erotica, paranormal romances and mysteries. I also write steampunk romances under the pen name Calista Taylor.

Posted 29 November 2011 - 11:26 PM

The only thing I think of is Beatrix Potter. But I've never heard the term before.


Cali MacKay

        FREE

51HdjDwZKxL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-51Ekbyv33TL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-51HnUjguTHL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-511uTCIPFnL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-51-y12BGRPL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-51LB9MAkXgL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-612uyFf1xML._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-61y0ZMZ-%2BaL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arro51J-PsyEZoL._SL500_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-

 


#7 Pete Morin

Pete Morin

    Nut Cracker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,469 posts
  • Literary Status:agented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Some shorts published in obscure anthologies.
    Diary of a Small Fish, a first little piggy heading to market.

Posted 30 November 2011 - 10:12 AM

lots of foul language and sexual innuendo?Posted Image
Pete

Posted Image

Read Diary of a Small Fish
Read Uneasy Living

Blog - Pete Morin
Join me on Facebook

#8 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 30 November 2011 - 11:53 AM

lots of foul language and sexual innuendo?Posted Image


Ah... I think that would be British 1980's Punk Rock.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#9 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:38 PM

The reason why I ask...

In passing on my last MS, my agent said that my MG/YA science fiction books have adult themes in them and appeal to adults as much as kids.

Well... YEAH! I work hard to make that balance, but she sees it as a problem. She sees the kids lit that's out there now as clearly for kids and that my work - while being excellent writing - is hard to sell.

So I'm looking for a marketing catch phrase that might discribe what used to be "Good for the whole family." To me British Style Children's Lit means darker darks, fully formed adult characters, and stark reality contrasted by high fantasy.

Since you can't say "It's like Harry Potter" I thought "British Style" might be a good substitute. From Dickens to Nesbit (thank you, Lucy) Stevenson to Rowlings, the Brits (or Scots in Robert Louis' case)have always approached childrens stories as literature first, "for Children" second.

Of course, whatever catch phrase I make up has to be self-explanatory. I can't waist words defining something I've made up.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#10 Jean Oram

Jean Oram

    Your friendly, neighborhood, all-purpose moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • 9,171 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:Indie publishing romance, magazine articles, etc., as well as traditionally published short stories.
  • City (optional):C-eh?-N-eh?-D-eh?

Posted 30 November 2011 - 01:45 PM

So I'm looking for a marketing catch phrase that might discribe what used to be "Good for the whole family." To me British Style Children's Lit means darker darks, fully formed adult characters, and stark reality contrasted by high fantasy.


I like that definition. It should be one. Because now that you have mentioned it and defined it, it makes PERFECT sense. That is totally it! My daughter (8) who is a little more 'mature' in terms of being a reader and all-round kid, likes British stuff. Not the dark stuff so much, but that it doesn't talk down to her. She can get as much as she wants out of it. And I find it fun to read to her.

Maybe you could call it British Style Children's Lit followed by your brief definition. To me it means more than any actual book/author comparison. Change the world, RS!

I love connecting with and helping other AQCers outside this forum as well. You can find me all over the place!

If you are looking for more about writing, you may find my blog helpful, as well as my Twitter feed:

*The Helpful Writer *Twitter

If you are a parent, you might be interested in my ideas on growing happy, healthy kids who'll thrive in this ever changing world (includes crafts, activities, games, articles, and fun!):
*Twitter *Blog *Pinterest *Facebook

 

Check it out! I write stuff (www.jeanoram.com):
 

ChampagneLemonDrops_20K1-e1363631144721.   Whiskey78k-e1383796585580.jpg   Rum-e1397057240802.jpg   loveandrumors579K-e1409935457105.jpg   loveanddreams1dot9MG-e1409935497302.jpg   HotSummerLove-e1409935103103.jpg

     FREE!               $2.99             $2.99               $2.99            $2.99   * $0.99 SEPTEMBER ONLY! *


#11 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 30 November 2011 - 08:22 PM

I like that definition. It should be one. Because now that you have mentioned it and defined it, it makes PERFECT sense. That is totally it! My daughter (8) who is a little more 'mature' in terms of being a reader and all-round kid, likes British stuff. Not the dark stuff so much, but that it doesn't talk down to her. She can get as much as she wants out of it. And I find it fun to read to her.

Maybe you could call it British Style Children's Lit followed by your brief definition. To me it means more than any actual book/author comparison. Change the world, RS!


I don't know about changing the world... I just want to sell books.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#12 Jean Oram

Jean Oram

    Your friendly, neighborhood, all-purpose moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • 9,171 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:Indie publishing romance, magazine articles, etc., as well as traditionally published short stories.
  • City (optional):C-eh?-N-eh?-D-eh?

Posted 30 November 2011 - 09:22 PM

Come on, dream BIG! First books, then the world!

I love connecting with and helping other AQCers outside this forum as well. You can find me all over the place!

If you are looking for more about writing, you may find my blog helpful, as well as my Twitter feed:

*The Helpful Writer *Twitter

If you are a parent, you might be interested in my ideas on growing happy, healthy kids who'll thrive in this ever changing world (includes crafts, activities, games, articles, and fun!):
*Twitter *Blog *Pinterest *Facebook

 

Check it out! I write stuff (www.jeanoram.com):
 

ChampagneLemonDrops_20K1-e1363631144721.   Whiskey78k-e1383796585580.jpg   Rum-e1397057240802.jpg   loveandrumors579K-e1409935457105.jpg   loveanddreams1dot9MG-e1409935497302.jpg   HotSummerLove-e1409935103103.jpg

     FREE!               $2.99             $2.99               $2.99            $2.99   * $0.99 SEPTEMBER ONLY! *


#13 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 01 December 2011 - 01:05 PM

Hmmmm.... Arthor C. Clark wrote about weaponized satellites before satellites existed... I've just written about how to make a real, working magic wand...

maybe I could change the world.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#14 Jean Oram

Jean Oram

    Your friendly, neighborhood, all-purpose moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • 9,171 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:Indie publishing romance, magazine articles, etc., as well as traditionally published short stories.
  • City (optional):C-eh?-N-eh?-D-eh?

Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:00 PM

That's the spirit!

I love connecting with and helping other AQCers outside this forum as well. You can find me all over the place!

If you are looking for more about writing, you may find my blog helpful, as well as my Twitter feed:

*The Helpful Writer *Twitter

If you are a parent, you might be interested in my ideas on growing happy, healthy kids who'll thrive in this ever changing world (includes crafts, activities, games, articles, and fun!):
*Twitter *Blog *Pinterest *Facebook

 

Check it out! I write stuff (www.jeanoram.com):
 

ChampagneLemonDrops_20K1-e1363631144721.   Whiskey78k-e1383796585580.jpg   Rum-e1397057240802.jpg   loveandrumors579K-e1409935457105.jpg   loveanddreams1dot9MG-e1409935497302.jpg   HotSummerLove-e1409935103103.jpg

     FREE!               $2.99             $2.99               $2.99            $2.99   * $0.99 SEPTEMBER ONLY! *


#15 EricJ

EricJ

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 429 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, unagented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Complimentary praise on rejection slips

Posted 04 December 2011 - 03:34 PM

Dang, I'm not sure. I was practically raised on Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl, but I can't see any similarities between the two, to be honest. :blush: Not getting it.

Is it something having to do with the sort of frank expository voice some British authors have? :blink:


Roald Dahl was an adult mystery author who personally thought kids were being "tyrannized" by the rule of big, belching authoritarian adults.
But to read the Dursleys in the first couple Harry Potters, or most of Eva Ibbotson, you would Roald Dahl was ALL THAT WAS IN most British children's libraries, growing up... :blink:

It almost national law that a British YA/MG author has to make rib-nudgingly over-the-top cartoon Dahl-baddies in their stories, no matter how realistic or natural the rest of the story plays out.

#16 Cat Woods

Cat Woods

    Juvenile Junky and Clairvoyant Ninja

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,155 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:As Cat Woods: adult short stories in SPRING FEVERS, THE FALL and SUMMER'S EDGE (June 2013). 2014 MG novel ABIGAIL BINDLE AND THE SLAM BOOK SCAM.

    As A.T.O'Connor: short stories in THE FALL and SUMMER'S EDGE. Fall 2013 YA novel WHISPERING MINDS.

Posted 05 December 2011 - 12:08 PM

RS, have you read Jonathan Stroud? He is the epitomy of contemporary British Children's Lit as far as I'm concerned.

What does that mean exactly? Charming, humorous with both adult and kid themes woven together simultaneously and seemlessly. In fact, I would highly recommend the Bartimaeus Trilogy to you because there are some aspects of it that you could use in comparisons with BB.

Just a thought.

Cat Woods
Juvenile Junction Group Moderator


Words from the Woods~ Blog for Cat Woods
From the Write Angle~ Group Blog

Whispering Minds~ Blog for A.T. O'Connor

 

SpringFeversthumb.jpg   thefall_front_cover.jpg


#17 Countrymouse

Countrymouse

    Literary mouse

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 136 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:None––as of yet. Fingers crossed that that will change.

Posted 05 December 2011 - 04:16 PM

Hi, RS

Yeah, I was thinking J.K. Rowling. I'm guessing your agent also hasn't read Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book. Very adult themes, yet written for a MG/YA audience.

I would think that if it's sci-fi, fantasy, and/or horror, or embodies any of those elements, some darker themes are to be expected. Could be just me though. I prefer dark.


Good luck,

I'm with Jean on this––start with books, then change the world.

Cheers,

Sue
Conventional opinion is the ruin of our Souls. ~Rumi~

#18 RSMellette

RSMellette

    I Have Many Skills.

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:The Xena Scrolls on-line and episode TV credit. I worked on the show for the first two years.
    Billy Bobble Makes A Magic Wand, Dec. 2014 Elephant's Bookshelf Press

Posted 05 December 2011 - 07:14 PM

Hi, RS

Yeah, I was thinking J.K. Rowling. I'm guessing your agent also hasn't read Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book. Very adult themes, yet written for a MG/YA audience.
Cheers,

Sue


Actually, she did say that the only author she could find to compare me with was Gaiman. I hadn't read any of his stuff then, but have now, and take it as a great compliment. Especially since he's now written for Dr. Who.

I never miss a chance to slip in a Who-reference.

51xExIpByyL._AA160_.jpg


#19 Countrymouse

Countrymouse

    Literary mouse

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 136 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:None––as of yet. Fingers crossed that that will change.

Posted 06 December 2011 - 02:07 PM

Actually, she did say that the only author she could find to compare me with was Gaiman. I hadn't read any of his stuff then, but have now, and take it as a great compliment. Especially since he's now written for Dr. Who.

I never miss a chance to slip in a Who-reference.



Wow! A compliment indeed. I love Neil Gaiman.


Cheers,
Sue
Conventional opinion is the ruin of our Souls. ~Rumi~

#20 Julez

Julez

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 106 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, emerging, unagented
  • LocationUnited Kingdom

Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:06 PM

hey, I'm British.

The term (which is a good one) "British-style Children's Lit" evokes authors/books like

Philip Pullman and his Dark Materials trilogy,

China Miévillex King Rat

William Mayne's Antar and the Eagles

As oppose to "American-style Children's Lit"

Rick Rordean and his Percy Jackson series

Rl Stine and his Goosebumps series

Orson Scott Card and his enders saga series




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users