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#21 Mark Friedlander

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:40 AM

I'm at the stage where I'm considering cover art, but I'm sort of stuck on the font copyright issue. What do you think of http://www.1001fonts.com as a site for searching for free for commercial use fonts? I looked at http://dafont.com but I had a hard time searching for free for commercial use fonts (perhaps I'm missing how to search for that). Thanks.

 In dafont, click one of the choices under one of the red category listings. Then, to the right of the words "Custom Preview" click "More Options". Then, to the right of "Only As" you can click "Public Domain" and "Free".

 

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#22 Robin Breyer

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:46 AM

Raziel, as long as you are rendering the cover as a bitmap, there is no issue using any font you have the legal right to use. You do not need any special copyright to use a font to produce a bitmap image. Only if you were to distribute a font within a file (such as a font embedded in an ebook or pdf) would you require a special commercial license to use a font.

 

A font is comprised of two pieces; the design of the letters/characters (properly called the typeface) which cannot be copyrighted but can be patented (which only lasts 17 years), and the bezier curve points that are used in the font to render the typeface at any size (the copyrighted portion of the font which is removed when it is rendered as a bitmap or printed on paper). Under US copyright law/interpretation by the courts, a typeface fails to meet the level of creativity to be considered a copyrightable artform. However, creating the shapes needed to make a scalable font does create a piece of computer software (the actual computer font) that is copyrightable, but anything it produces that does not contain that software (rendered as a fixed size bitmap image or printed on a surface) is only covered by any potential patent protection of the typeface.


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#23 Raziel

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:53 AM

Thanks, Robin. If I'm reading you right, then by bitmap, you mean saving the cover as an image? (For instance, does what you've said apply equally to .gif and .jpeg etc.?). Thanks again for the help - this isn't something I know very much about.

 

Thanks as well, Mark. I tried what you suggested and it worked!



#24 Robin Breyer

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:55 AM

Any image rendered as pixels. The most common files types are .bmp, .jpg, .tif, .png, and .gif. You have to be careful of some images types because they save the font outlines. Software such as Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, MS Word, etc. You also have to be careful if you are generating a pdf from these sources. As ebook covers must be .jpg files, they are pretty safe.

 

If you are outside the US, check your local copyright laws. They are not all the same.


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#25 KimYoonmi

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 07:44 PM

If anyone needs tips on graphic design for covers, I can help with the tips, though I do not do covers for free for you.

 

I can cover graphics, color harmony, communication through art, typography, etc.


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#26 TBruce

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 08:42 PM

I didn't see this covered anywhere else (feel free to bop me on the head if I missed it):

 

So, let's say you managed to get an AMAZING deal where a photographer/graphic artist is going to do an original piece of photo manipulation art for your book cover and she's going to actually do a photo shoot for this artwork, using a model from an agency who is willing to do "time for prints" (apparently, this is a thing models do where they will waive their fee in exchange for a copy of all the photos taken for their portfolio).

 

What rights/paperwork (a release of some kind?) does one need to secure from the MODEL to use her image on your book cover(s)?

 

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#27 J. Lea Lopez

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 12:04 PM

You should get a model release... though to be honest, I'm not sure what that includes lol.

#28 Midnight Whimsy

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 01:32 PM

I'm by no means an expert, but as I understand it, it's the photographer's job to provide a model release form for the model and make sure it gets signed. Model releases are usually pretty standard boilerplate stuff that outlines how and where you can use that model's photos. It would be a good idea for you to get a copy of the model release, but it's not your job to prepare one or provide it to the model. The photographer works with the model, you work with the photographer. :)

 

Good luck!

 

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#29 Dawn Marie

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 07:55 AM

There were some great discussions going on here at AQ regarding the copyright of images and their legal use. Whenever I make a cover, I first try and find an image through a photo stock site, because I know I can pick up an image for little money, and it will save me any legal headaches in the future. The standard licensing on most of the sites allows the image to be used on an ebook and print book, though you'll always want to double check their wording. Confused? Most sites have a free 800 # and are happy to answer any questions!

Though there are a TON of stock photo sites, the cost can vary widely, with most medium size photos (usually the size you'll want to be working with) running between $4- $1200. Needless to say, I usually hit the $4 sites which have an amazing amount of great photos, though I'll admit, $1200 buys you some GORGEOUS photos.

Licensing also needs to be taken into account for fonts and also for any brushes you may use-- and it can and will vary so again, make sure anything you use specifies that it's ok for commercial use.

Here's a list of sites I use for stock photos-- they're all in that $4 range for a M-- and also other sites for fonts and brushes. Feel free to add any sites you use!!

Stock Photos

http://bigstockphoto.com
http://123rf.com
http://photos.com
http://stockfresh.com

Fonts
http://dafont.com (an advanced search can narrow things down to just fonts that can be used commercially)

Brushes
I tend to go to http://deviantart.com and search under their resources/stock category for brushes (and sometimes stock photos, also) BUT you need to be very careful with regards to the allowed use, since each artist differs. Some ONLY allow the image/brush to be displayed on deviantart, others allow commercial use but with a link back.

Hope this helps!

This is really helpful, thank you  :smile:


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