Jump to content

Disclaimer



Photo

A Book a Year is Slacking


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 S.K. Keogh

S.K. Keogh

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,365 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut historical novel, THE PRODIGAL, was published in 2012 by Fireship Press. My second novel, THE ALLIANCE, was released in Dec 2013. Currently I am querying agents with another historical novel.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 09:29 AM

Patterson does 12 books in a year? I know he has co-writers but even so, how is that even possible? A novel a month? Insane. http://www.nytimes.c...1&_r=2&emc=eta1

____________

 

SKKeogh.com

 

http://www.facebook.com/S.K.Keogh


Click to purchase your copy or to read free samples
Photobucket.jpg19279504.jpgSmallCover_zpsa4ea36fe.jpg


#2 TBruce

TBruce

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 660 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:It's complicated...

Posted 14 May 2012 - 10:22 AM

::groan:: oh God, just one more reason to feel bad about myself. Well, I console myself I'd be more prolific if I didn't have to work full time. ::sigh::

hereafter_cover_jpg_72_twitter.jpg

 

Terri Bruce--creating my own special blend of literary science fiction and fantasy
Website/Blog | Twitter | Facebook Fan Page | Facebook Profile Page | Goodreads

 
 


#3 Joey

Joey

    Owner of an Evil Little Manuscript

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,176 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Newspaper articles in hometown newspaper on medicine and specialty insurance topics. Stop by my blog where refreshing iced is served after swift, verbal punches are thrown.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 10:52 AM

Well goodness gracious, if you have a)a team behind you "helping" you write and b) can afford to have as your full time job "being a writer" then I can see being far more productive. Trying to squeeze in work, life and writing takes balance.

Sometimes I fear that excessive novel procreation can lead to mediocrity. But that's just my theory.

Visit my blog! www.joeyfrancisco.blogspot.com

JoeynGA on Twitter!

 

 

 

"Substitute "damn" every time you're inclined to write "very"; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be."

 

 

 

 

~Mark Twain

 


#4 spauff

spauff

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 76 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Newspaper articles, columns and blog posts, but no published fiction...yet.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 01:29 PM

Sometimes I fear that excessive novel procreation can lead to mediocrity. But that's just my theory.


I agree. I'm not generally a fan of Patterson. I think his books read like they were mass produced.

Of course, this trend having to produce more and more stretches across other forms of writing too. I work as a newspaper reporter. In the "good 'ole days" that my older co-workers talk about, you would "feed the beast," once a day, -- producing an article or two for the print edition. Now, the Internet and the 24-hour news cycle means you never stop producing. There are fewer editors too, so you have to proof your own work and errors slip in. Sometimes it makes me want to tear my hair out.

#5 Caterina

Caterina

    Zombie Whisperer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, emerging, published, unagented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Self-published my first book, Zombie Whisperer.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 01:44 PM

Holy Crackers! That's pretty damn impressive. If I'm lucky, I can barely write one book per year (here's to hoping Death's List will be finished this year)

#6 S Jenan

S Jenan

    Even my dreams are third person past tense.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,036 posts
  • Literary Status:unagented
  • LocationUS Southwest
  • Publishing Experience:None.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 02:02 PM

Two (plus a smidgen) per year is what I can manage, but the nuts and bolts of typing it all out aside, there just aren't enough ideas I could come up with in month to manage that pace. Sure, maybe to think up a storyline and characters, but all the richness and depth comes from the rewrites (oh dear Lord please make these rewrites stop!), finding surprises in the prose that I hadn't realized were there, themes and interactions. All the moments I craft that make this worth doing I have to find in the process. I could write a main character in one month, but everything interesting about my supporting characters takes until month three to materialize.

Now I'm going to read a Patterson book. Never have.

WIP - Black Sea. It's not about the Black Sea.

Twitter: @sljenan Follow my ongoing quest to tweet that elusive 141st character...

 

Blog: The Slosh Pile More alcohol stuff than writer stuff. Wait, alcohol stuff IS writer stuff...


#7 Joey

Joey

    Owner of an Evil Little Manuscript

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,176 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Newspaper articles in hometown newspaper on medicine and specialty insurance topics. Stop by my blog where refreshing iced is served after swift, verbal punches are thrown.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:07 PM

I have a feeling if I start reading Patterson now, it will not do anything much for me. Again, I have a nasty habit of tossing books (not forcefully) but down upon the floor that I find cliched or poorly written. Entertain me and do not give me the same ol' story and same ol' song and dance (sorry for the Aerosmith reference).

Visit my blog! www.joeyfrancisco.blogspot.com

JoeynGA on Twitter!

 

 

 

"Substitute "damn" every time you're inclined to write "very"; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be."

 

 

 

 

~Mark Twain

 


#8 Eli Ashpence

Eli Ashpence

    (Penny Avatar Inserted)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,681 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Starting over.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 05:52 PM

I believe it. It only took me three years to write my 3.2 million word fanfiction (~27-41 novels, if broken down to 80k-100k lengths).

If it'd been an original fiction.... and I had agents, editors, and publishers waiting in the wings to do all the legwork for me.... I don't think it would have taken long to transition from rough draft to final draft.

It's all about motivation and support.... including a strong foundation in your written world.

P.S. Of course, this is also how I got Carpal Tunnel. :(

"Until the last breath leaves my body, I'll keep walking."  --Allen Walker, "D. Gray-man"


#9 H. Bruce

H. Bruce

    A Man of Mice

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 386 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, unagented
  • LocationUS Southeast
  • Publishing Experience:Not yet.

Posted 14 May 2012 - 06:39 PM

I'm sorry, but 12 books per year sounds like misery. Not for me.

#10 S.K. Keogh

S.K. Keogh

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,365 posts
  • Literary Status:published, in-between agents
  • LocationUS Midwest
  • Publishing Experience:My debut historical novel, THE PRODIGAL, was published in 2012 by Fireship Press. My second novel, THE ALLIANCE, was released in Dec 2013. Currently I am querying agents with another historical novel.

Posted 15 May 2012 - 10:29 PM

I'm sorry, but 12 books per year sounds like misery. Not for me.


When compared to the misery of my day job, I think I'd rather produce one novel a month! :laugh:

____________

 

SKKeogh.com

 

http://www.facebook.com/S.K.Keogh


Click to purchase your copy or to read free samples
Photobucket.jpg19279504.jpgSmallCover_zpsa4ea36fe.jpg


#11 Brendacarre

Brendacarre

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,032 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, published, unagented, industry insider
  • LocationCanada
  • Publishing Experience:I write fantasy, urban fantasy, young adult, steampunk and romance fiction. I also write short fiction in a variety of genres. I have published short fiction. My first pro fiction sale was THE TALE OF NAMELESS CHAMELEON (recommended reading by Tangent Online) to the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Most recent publications: EMBRACE OF THE PLANETS Sept-October 2014 Magazine of F&Sf. SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY November 2014 FICTION RIVER PAST CRIME ANTHOLOGY, GOOLIE UNRULY, Feb 2015 SKYWARRIOR BOOKS FIRST CONTACT CAFE ANTHOLOGY, GRET, BLACKGUARDS/BLACKLIST ANTHOLOGY from Ragnarok Publications, ST JEAN AND THE DRAGON May 2015 FICTION RIVER ALCHEMY AND STEAM ANTHOLOGY. I am currently at work on a Mythic Epic Fantasy series set in a Parallel Universe.

Posted 16 May 2012 - 02:34 AM

I do know folks who write a book every two months. It is their process, but this is not the way everyone works. I do believe that the more you write the more fluid you become, however. I think people like Patterson write from the intuitive part of the brain and don't spend a whole lot of time on the editing process. If this works for you great. But I don't think it helps to beat yourself up if you aren't producing like this. I think it takes a whole lot of experience to write at this level.


#12 Joey

Joey

    Owner of an Evil Little Manuscript

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,176 posts
  • Literary Status:emerging, unagented
  • LocationUS South
  • Publishing Experience:Newspaper articles in hometown newspaper on medicine and specialty insurance topics. Stop by my blog where refreshing iced is served after swift, verbal punches are thrown.

Posted 16 May 2012 - 07:14 AM

Brenda is right. There probably is a very comfortable process Patterson has in place to accomplish this task. He may be writing nonstop, and then have many people editing everything he does, so that could possibly expedite his process. Having "people" is imho, a necessity if you are to be that productive of a writer.

But yes, if this were my job, I think I'd be far more productive as well.

Visit my blog! www.joeyfrancisco.blogspot.com

JoeynGA on Twitter!

 

 

 

"Substitute "damn" every time you're inclined to write "very"; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be."

 

 

 

 

~Mark Twain

 


#13 mwsinclair

mwsinclair

    Elephant with a trunk full of novels

  • Group Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,554 posts
  • Literary Status:published, unagented, media
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Journalist covering U.S. nonprofits, foundations, and life in general. President and Chief Elephant Officer of Elephant's Bookshelf Press, LLC. Since establishing the company in 2012, we have published ten books, including short stories by several AQC writers and debut novels by AQC authors A.T. O'Connor (aka Cat Woods), "ScubaSteve" Carman, and R.S. Mellette. Heading into 2016, we're aiming to publish at least two books, including the second Mellette novel and an anthology. In 2015, I saw a few memoir/nonfiction pieces published in Red Fez. I expect to do more of that in 2016 and beyond, while also looking to add freelance editing and writing clients.

Posted 16 May 2012 - 07:44 AM

Yes, it's very much about having a process and discipline. It's not a book a month, exactly, it's having several projects working simultaneously and managing them all. In Patterson's case, he's basically established a writing factory with a product issued per month. In my opinion, he's more an editor than a writer these days, keeping track of multiple projects and polishing off things to fit his brand's style and substance. It's probably three or four months per book, but he's got 12 in production at any time and is also planning the next project while another is rolling off the assembly line. That's publishing.

#14 Rick Spilman

Rick Spilman

    Veteran Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,145 posts
  • Literary Status:published
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:My novel Hell Around the Horn is published by Old Salt Press

Posted 16 May 2012 - 09:16 AM

Yes, it's very much about having a process and discipline. It's not a book a month, exactly, it's having several projects working simultaneously and managing them all. In Patterson's case, he's basically established a writing factory with a product issued per month. In my opinion, he's more an editor than a writer these days, keeping track of multiple projects and polishing off things to fit his brand's style and substance. It's probably three or four months per book, but he's got 12 in production at any time and is also planning the next project while another is rolling off the assembly line. That's publishing.


What I find odd about Patterson and his book factory is not that he has a team of writers cranking out the prose, but rather that the plot lines and characterizations have to to be reduced to a set of formulas to keep up with the speed of the assembly line.

I am not a Patterson fan so I do not follow his product line, nevertheless, I suppose that I have an idea of what his readers find interesting based on my TV watching. I think I have seen most of the original Law and Order episodes, yet I can remember very few of the story lines. I suppose if one is aiming for the forgettable but high volume, Patterson may be a good model. Not my first choice and certainly not the reason I write.

#15 Robin Breyer

Robin Breyer

    Timelord & Traveler

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,900 posts
  • Literary Status:self-published
  • LocationUS Northwest
  • Publishing Experience:Smashwords, Kindle Direct Publishing, Createspace

Posted 16 May 2012 - 10:31 AM

If I didn't have a day job, I could churn out the rough draft of a book a month, but I couldn't edit them that fast. The fastest I could see myself going would be to write 6 novels a year and still have time to edit them. My plan is 3 a year with some short stories thrown in. This year I don't know if I will make that. My current WIP has stagnated and I need to get energized (in more ways than one) about it again. But last year for NNWM, I wrote a full 150k word novel within the month. I can do it, but that pace was too fast for me. I think my max speed to turn out a descent product is no more than 100k in a month (well, maybe 110k). My current self publishing goal is the get a second novel edited and released this summer and have a third ready for Christmas and to write two (one now and one for NNWM) with a third of a different sort thrown in before November. That would be about 400k this year. That is stretching things and supposes that I can actually meed my daily writing goal, which I so far have been failing at.

Website, Blog

 

Writing as Scott Seldon:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

Writing as Robert Courtland:
Website, Blog, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and iTunes

 

 


#16 Caterina

Caterina

    Zombie Whisperer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • Literary Status:just starting, emerging, published, unagented
  • LocationUS Northeast
  • Publishing Experience:Self-published my first book, Zombie Whisperer.

Posted 16 May 2012 - 10:43 AM

If I didn't have a day job, I could churn out the rough draft of a book a month, but I couldn't edit them that fast.


Hey, if we're taking away our day jobs, then I could probably churn out at least 4-5 books per year at least. I would love to be a full time author one day.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users