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Use Common Sense When Sharing Your Work


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#21 KateJourdan

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 12:25 AM

Well I am definately in the newbie category. However sometimes you can trust your gut to a point. If you don't catch someone, maybe someone who has gotten to know you on here can fill in the blanks. I will be perusing very carefully for beta readers for a while before I get the nerve to approach anyone. I think it is expected of writers and authors to be nervous as someone once said you open yourself up to the world when you write. That is why everyone adores words of one way or another spoken or written.



#22 Rihan761

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 06:51 PM

Great advice. I think having your hard work stolen is every writers worst nightmare.



#23 mladie14

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 09:37 AM

I think another good way to protect yourself is to send a copy of your work to U.S. Copyright Office. That way if a new #1 best seller looks strangly similar to the one you have written you have a good way of proving it was your work.  I'd just make sure to have it copyrighted as soon as you are complete and ready to have other people look at it.



#24 sharpegirl

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:01 PM

I think another good way to protect yourself is to send a copy of your work to U.S. Copyright Office. That way if a new #1 best seller looks strangly similar to the one you have written you have a good way of proving it was your work.  I'd just make sure to have it copyrighted as soon as you are complete and ready to have other people look at it.

 

Unless you're self-publishing, this is not the greatest idea, because your publisher takes care of this--after the book is revised. And if you tell an agent you've copyrighted your manuscript, it comes off as amateurish. Publishers don't want a bunch of different versions of the book floating around.



#25 mladie14

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 10:10 AM

Unless you're self-publishing, this is not the greatest idea, because your publisher takes care of this--after the book is revised. And if you tell an agent you've copyrighted your manuscript, it comes off as amateurish. Publishers don't want a bunch of different versions of the book floating around.

 

 

The only problem with that is not eveyone is lucky enough to get an agent or publisher so protecting their work is left in their hands.



#26 sharpegirl

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 02:35 PM

The only problem with that is not eveyone is lucky enough to get an agent or publisher so protecting their work is left in their hands.

 

Which is why my advice was preceded by "Unless you are self publishing" meaning if you are pursuing trade publication. You mentioned nothing about trade or self, you just said to copyright your work as soon as you are done and ready for others to look at it. I mentioned that it might not be the best idea if you're going any way but Self, because the publisher takes care of that for you and there's a lot of change that happens. Plus, if you tell an agent in a query "I have this copyrighted!" it comes off as clueless and not knowing how the industry works. I absolutely believe it's necessary to copyright your work yourself in the SP world, just look at the thread that AQ Crew started about the plagiarism problem. 

 

But if you are pursuing trade publication, copyrighting your own work can cause some snafus. Which is why it is not recommend. 

 

If a person really distrusts an agent so much with their work that they don't feel it's safe to send to them unless it's copyrighted, then I'm not sure why a person would trust them to enter a business partnership with them. After all, any money involved is sent from the publisher TO the agent, who then sends it to the author. If you can't trust them not to steal your words, how can you trust them not to steal your money? My best advice to alleviate those kind of fears is to do your agent research, query professionals with proven track records and great clients who you see regularly on shelves. 



#27 Sherry1781

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 11:18 AM

I'm happy to see that I'm not the only one worried about this! We're told to use CP's and beta readers that are writers vs only relying on friends/family if we truly want to polish our MS, but the thought of sending it to a "stranger" is terrifying because I think most of us worry that our work will be stolen or posted somewhere online. 

 

To those who are experienced in sharing your work, do you think sending it via e-mail protects you at all as far as proving it's your work? Not that it would help if someone just posts your stuff online, but at least it might help if they were to actually go and publish it as their own.



#28 sharpegirl

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 06:53 PM

I'm happy to see that I'm not the only one worried about this! We're told to use CP's and beta readers that are writers vs only relying on friends/family if we truly want to polish our MS, but the thought of sending it to a "stranger" is terrifying because I think most of us worry that our work will be stolen or posted somewhere online. 

 

To those who are experienced in sharing your work, do you think sending it via e-mail protects you at all as far as proving it's your work? Not that it would help if someone just posts your stuff online, but at least it might help if they were to actually go and publish it as their own.

 

Honestly, I think the best thing to protect yourself is to be friends with your CP's and only send your work to people you trust. Considering that actual published books get plagiarized all the time on amazon under different titles, having an email trail would definitely help in proving to a web site that you're the author, so that could be helpful. But in terms of like, taking someone to court over it? I'm not a lawyer so I'm not sure :D But using common sense and being careful are the best protections, IMO. I wouldn't worry TOO much. There are definitely crummy people out there, but I think the good ones outweigh the crummy :) 



#29 Dawn Marie

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 08:55 AM

Good advice.  Thanks.  I'm new and will be wanting a Beta reader in the next few weeks.  I hope to attract an established member, otherwise I'll wait.  :smile:


I'm a work in progress


#30 MamaTee

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 04:57 PM

After reading everyone's post on this thread, I feel more relaxed.  I'm a newbie who is  apparently not as unreasonably paranoid about the sharing of my work as I thought I was.  I figured that I was the only one.  Thanks, everyone for making me feel better-  except you, Peter Burton.  You freak me out!  (Just kiddin')



#31 Paula Davids

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 11:44 AM

Hi, I am a newbie here, but am already impressed by the quality of discourse on the site. I hope to get to know you better.

 

With respect to Jean Oram’s headline post (which I think is very sound) another way of protecting your work might be to publish your pre-beta draft in a local organ, or possibly a share your work forum – that will establish and date your ownership incontrovertibly. Then, when you eventually submit your work to a beta reader you can reveal this (ever so subtly and nicely). If you are dealing with a shark, they will almost certainly move on to more promising waters. After all, if they intend to defraud you with the objective of making money they will know that you will sue them if they are significantly successful – all their effort in promoting your work will go to waste.

However, the thought of having to litigate (not to mention the heartbreak of betrayed trust) makes me feel ill. Much better to proceed slowly and build trust, as Jean suggests. :wacko: 



#32 iads2jw

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    As my works are very long, I prefer to publish them on the Internet.

Posted 29 July 2017 - 07:53 AM

Thank you for your advice, Jean.

What I've been writing is poetry, which is very long and a work in progress. Therefore:

While posting a notice for each poetry update on Facebook and other poetry sites including this site, I do not "send" any materials to others, and while including a link to my site in every notice I post, I do not share any physical materials with others -- links are electric materials.

Besides, looking at my work Aestas, you will know no one will ever intend to imitate, steal, or criticise it, let alone impersonate me:
http://aestas.sakura.ne.jp/

I appreciate your precious comments.

Kind regards,

Walter Daniel
 



#33 Vivairi

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 10:23 PM

I'm super happy I'm not the only one that is a little scared of sending my work off to people that I don't know in person! It's refreshing to see that so many other people share this concern--and I think it illustrates that we're mostly all the same here; just hardworking writers that have no ill-intent towards others that share the trade. We're just looking to help each other, and that's beautiful!






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