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My Self-Publishing Experiment - Initial Results


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#1 dgaughran

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:47 AM

Hi,

As some of you may know, I decided to take the plunge into self-publishing at the start of April, beginning with some short stories to test the waters. I self-published my first title on May 4 and my second on May 21. A few days ago, I pulled my novel from the four agents that were still considering it, as I had decided to self-publish that too.

I wrote a post on my blog today, fulfilling a promise I had made to my readers that I would publish my sales figures at the end of each month. I thought those who are considering self-publishing - or those curious about it - might find it useful, so I have cross-posted it here, in full (it's quite long). If there is interest, I can come back each month and do the same, but without the long preamble next time!

Dave


My Self-Publishing Experiment - Initial Results

I started this blog at the beginning of April at the same time that I made my decision to self-publish. I thought I would document the process of an unknown, unpublished writer as they attempted to get noticed out of the near-million items in the Kindle Store.

People warned me that there was so much crap out there that I would sink to the bottom unnoticed. However, that just strengthened my belief that if you put out a professional product (well-edited, good cover, competitive price, catchy blurb, clever marketing), that you would stand out even more.

Right from the start, I promised to give you my sales figures, warts and all. There were times this month that I regretted that pledge. I went four days when I sold nothing at all in the US, and a whole week in the UK, but my sales pulled through in the end and I comfortably beat my targets.

Too often the talk in self-publishing is about people at the very top of the bestseller charts whom we have no realistic hope of matching, or people who don’t approach this professionally (i.e. poor editor, crappy design etc.), and sell nothing at all.

I don’t think either extreme is particularly useful for the average unpublished writer who is considering self-publishing.

What first made me sit up and take notice of self-publishing was the amazing figures being posted by people like Joe Konrath, Amanda Hocking, and John Locke.

However, what convinced me to take the plunge was the much more widespread success of previously unpublished writers on the next “tier” down: David Dalglish, Victorine Lieske, HP Mallory, Michael Wallace, Christopher Smith, Mel Comley, J. Carson Black, David McAffee, Sibel Hodge, Imogen Rose, and many more.

Robin Sullivan of Ridan Publishing regularly posts monthly totals of some of the top-sellers she has information for. But even more convincing than that was the monthly thread on Kindle Boards, where people published their totals whether they were selling big numbers or not. (Like this one: http://www.kindleboa...ic,69390.0.html)

Two things became clear to me. First, there were a lot more people making good money from self-publishing than I realised. Second, the sales curve for self-published work is completely different to traditional publishing.

In traditional publishing there is a massive push in the first week and the first month to sell as many copies as possible. Good numbers are crucial in preventing booksellers from returning the books to the publisher, so all the marketing push is focussed on those opening weeks.

If the first month is a good one, the hope is that momentum will carry the book through a few months good sales before it dies down to a trickle. If it’s a bad one (which is far more likely), the book is written off and destroyed.

However, in self-publishing, it is completely different. Virtually every writer who posted their sales figures had a slow build, with each month gradually improving before some kind of jump after five, six, or seven months.

None of them could really put their finger on what led to the boom, but many felt it was their cumulative marketing efforts finally finding their audience.

This is a great boon to self-publishers. It removes the insane pressure for instant success, and give you time to find the pricing and marketing strategies that work for you. It also negates the unrealistic expectations that hound trade published writers, where their book is deemed a hit or a flop in a matter of days.

All that said, it’s time for my figures.

I launched my first e-book If You Go Into The Woods on May 4 & my second Transfection on May 21. Both titles are short stories. The first has a length of around 4,000 words, the second, closer to 6,000. Both are priced at the minimum 99c.

I had some fears that I would sell only a handful because of the sheer amount of full-length novels, many from bestsellers, available for the same price.

Full Breakdown for May

If You Go Into The Woods (on sale since May 4)

Amazon US 88

Amazon UK 15

Amazon DE 1

Smashwords 4

Sub-total 108

Transfection (on sale since May 21)

Amazon US 40

Amazon UK 2

Amazon DE 0

Smashwords 3

Sub-total 45

Total 153*

*That total includes 13 copies gifted through Amazon, but doesn’t include free downloads on Smashwords or copies given away through other means.

“Real” Total 140

With both titles there was an initial burst of sales, then nothing, then a slow build (with ups and downs).

Neither title is in the Smashwords Premium Catalogue yet, which is cutting out 20%-30% of my sales channels (I am international so can’t list direct with Barnes & Noble and must go through Smashwords).

Sales of Transfection have been much stronger in the US. In fact, overall sales have collapsed completely in the UK, with only 1 sale in the last week of May. I haven’t figured out why yet, although 99% of my promotional efforts are focused on the US.

There was zero spend on advertising, until May 27, when I took out a cheap ad on the KU Forum which has had zero effect on sales.

I made a couple of mistakes, which had an effect on sales (not least running a competition on Twitter and sending 70 US readers to my Amazon UK listing – ouch).

I had a couple of breaks with some nice reviews in book blogs towards the end of the month which will hopefully lift sales (or keep them at this level) in June. I got a very nice review from SIFT Book Reviews two days ago, and I’m hoping that will have a positive effect.

Obviously, it’s too early to draw any conclusions, but the reviews are building nicely, and some people are starting to say some nice things.

Personally, I am delighted. It’s far more than I could have expected.

Out of all the promotional things I attempted, the second most effective was competitions. The first, by far, was releasing a new title. The sales of If You Go Into The Woods jumped when I released Transfection, even though they are different genres.

When I started on this path, I was unknown and unpublished (aside from few stories in magazines). I also had no platform. I started a blog in April about a month before my first release.

It grew pretty fast – I was hitting 1000 views a week by the release of If You Go Into The Woods, and it’s approaching 2000 views a week now.

My recommendation to anyone considering self-publishing is to start building that platform now. I only joined Twitter 3 weeks ago, and I should have done that a lot earlier. Blogging too.

There are tons of (free) promotional avenues I haven’t explored yet, and I am still experimenting with what is an effective use of my time. I should have a clearer picture in a few months.

But overall, I’m very happy with the way things are gone.

Cold Hard Cash

So what’s that in dollars? I make 35 cent per copy sold in the US, about the same from the UK, a little more in Germany, and a lot more from Smashwords. In total I cleared over $50.

I’m not driving a gold car yet, but it’s a good start. Remember, self-publishing is all about a slow build. To give you a comparison, John Locke made less than that in his first six months. He made $126,000 in April.

To put it another way, I covered 50% of the costs of the first story in 3 weeks. The second one was a little more expensive to produce and will take longer to cover costs, but then everything after that is profit. Forever. With no further costs on my side.

The plan is to use these shorts as a springboard to tap into the higher royalty rates. I’m never going to get rich making 35c per e-book.

My next project will be priced at $2.99 and that will make me over $2 a copy. The next release after that will be $3.99 or $4.99 (haven’t decided yet), and that will make me $2.79/$3.49 a copy.

I view the stories as “loss leaders” for the longer work (even though it looks like they will turn a profit). Longer work tends to sell much better, plus you get the 70% royalty rate instead of 35%.

The hope is that readers who aren’t sure whether to take a risk at a higher price, have a lower-priced alternative to sample my writing.

Plus, they will see the reviews of the lower-priced stuff (which has done well in that regard so far). Essentially, the short stories are like ads for the rest of my stuff which will come out this summer.

Also, I will bundle them into collection of 5 for $2.99 too, which will also tap into that higher royalty rate.

That’s speaking with my business hat on. I love writing shorts just for the fun of it too.

So, how do I feel overall? Well, I’m beginning to build an audience, I’m starting to get my name out there, and collect some good reviews.

But you know what? If $50 is all I ever make, if I never sell one more copy, I will be out about $140. Even if that happens, the experience (and the education) will have been well worth it.

I see these sales as the start, not the end. There is huge potential here. I just can’t wait to bring out longer work and see what level my sales could rise to.

June, here we come!
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#2 Cat Woods

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 08:10 AM

Thanks so much for this informative break-down. I appreciate that you put yourself out there for us to see some real figures. I'm sure others considering the e-pub route will also enjoy this info.

Best luck as you continue on your journey~

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#3 mwsinclair

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 08:19 AM

Indeed interesting, thanks!

#4 Pete Morin

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 08:21 AM

Well done, Dave. Thanks for sharing.

So, approximately how many hours a day or week would you say you've spent on marketing?

And tell us (if you will) about the competition you ran!
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#5 Peter Burton

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:46 AM

Congratulations, Dave!

It is results like these that gives me hope.

Thanks, M'man! :biggrin:

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And just like us, you must have had, a Once Upon A Time."

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#6 jwmstudio

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 10:20 AM

Thanks so much for posting this. It's very helpful!
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#7 Eric Maskell

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 11:21 AM

That is AWESOME! This is what keeps me going. I have just now started to send out query letters but in the back of my mind I hold onto the idea that if its not ready for an agent or publisher to snap up then I'm going to self publish. I believe in the story and have had positive feedback on it. I have a friend who self published and we are supposed to be having lunch tomorrow so I can get his book, signed as well, and talk about his trials in querying/publishing. But I think that is a great plan. With each subsequent book you are building a larger and larger fan base eventually, assuming the writing stays at the high level you start with, garnering quite a following.

Inspirational.

E

#8 dgaughran

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 01:27 PM

Well done, Dave. Thanks for sharing.

So, approximately how many hours a day or week would you say you've spent on marketing?

And tell us (if you will) about the competition you ran!


It depends. And it depends what you consider pure "marketing".

For example, I write a blog every day. That can be quick, or if I am researching something like the relative size of the various e-book markets in Europe it can take a long time. Technically, that could be considered "marketing", but as I am compiling a lot of these posts into a book which will go onsale this month, it could be considered writing too.

My golden rule is writing comes first. When I am done with writing, or just burnt out, or stuck, or whatever, then I promote. The time really varies from day to day, or week to week.

Around a release, it takes every spare second. Times like now, very little. It really depends. Some days you decide to hit as many book bloggers as possible, or input all your contacts into a mailing list and that can take all day. Other days you just send out a tweet or two, make a couple of facebook posts, post on a couple of Kindle forums, and it takes maybe 15 minutes.

You begin to learn what has an effect and what doesn't (and it's different for everyone), so you learn to use your time more effectively as you go along.

In short, I was spending a lot of time on it at the start, not so much now, but the few days around a release will swamp everything else.

Re the competition, that was a lot of fun, and could have got me a lot of sales if I didn't screw it up.

I announced I was going to give away a bunch of free e-books. To enter, all people had to do was tweet "I want a free copy of IF YOU GO INTO THE WOODS by David Gaughran so bad that it HURTS" or something like that. People thought it was fun, and it spread quite a bit on twitter. I was giving bonus entries and spot prizes for creativity. So people were taking photos promoting the book, doing facebook posts, one woman even wrote me an open letter on her blog demanding a free copy! So that was fun. The winners left lots of nice reviews, it cost me nothing, and it gave a nice bump to sales and brought some traffic to the blog and got me quite a few followers on twitter.

Only problem was, in the tweet I asked everyone to send was a bit.ly link. But it was the link for my UK listing. Over 70 people clicked on it that day, and over 90% of those were from the US. Big mistake. I could have made serious sales. But it still worked pretty well.

These things are tricky to pull off. I tried something similar with my second release, and it wasn't quite as successful.

My #1 tip re competitions is this: Do them on Friday when the internet is drunk.

That competition might sound like a lot of effort, but it was an idea I came up with that morning. An hour later, the blog post went live announcing it (which is linked to FB and Twitter). I then went out for the entire day, came back at 9pm, and it was all happening without any input from me.

There is so much stuff you can do that costs you nothing, it's amazing. Some of the stuff is can be time intensive, some isn't. But the trick is to always make new writing come first. It's the #1 promo thing you can do - release new stuff.

Dave

P.S. Re to query or not to query, I'm obviously pro self-publishing, but I am glad I went through 18 months of querying. It toughened me up and it tightened my work up - I must have gone through 3 or 4 new drafts in that time. If self-publishing had been as popular in 2009, I might have done it, and that would have been a disaster - my work wasn't ready.
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#9 Deb Borys

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:30 PM

Dave, you are doing exactly what I was/am doing only you're doing it successfully! :smile: Check out my blog at www.debra-r-borys.com if you want to see what I mean.

I was wondering if your sales are because you also are selling your book, as opposed to just the two short stories you mentioned. I was planning on self pubbing my novel, but when a publishing company offered me a contact, I decided to just publish two of my short stories instead.

I've been telling myself my slow sales are because no one wants to pay 99¢ for a short story. What do you think?
Deb Borys
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#10 RuthCardello

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 06:10 AM

Dave,

Love that you share your numbers. I'm so impressed with the self-published authors I've met since I started on the same road. Lots of people sharing and helping each other out.

Never thought of bundling later. Great idea.

I've posted my numbers in the Welcome section of this site. I'm really enjoying learning how to self-market.

Love your traffic on your blog. My blog gets 10-20 people a day and I suspect I'm related to half of them :)

Nice work!

Ruth
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#11 dgaughran

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 11:57 AM

Dave, you are doing exactly what I was/am doing only you're doing it successfully! :smile: Check out my blog at www.debra-r-borys.com if you want to see what I mean.

I was wondering if your sales are because you also are selling your book, as opposed to just the two short stories you mentioned. I was planning on self pubbing my novel, but when a publishing company offered me a contact, I decided to just publish two of my short stories instead.

I've been telling myself my slow sales are because no one wants to pay 99¢ for a short story. What do you think?


Hi Deb,

The only titles I have out are the two e-books in my signature. Both are short stories (99c).

I think there is a market at that price, for sure. Nobody knew who the hell I was a month ago and I have sold over 150 e-books.

The basic rules for e-book success are:

#1 Great Cover
#2 Great Blurb
#3 Great Opening
#4 Great Book
#5 Great Promo

I'm doing well on #1, I haven't quite nailed #2 but they are looking better now. #3 is tricky with shorts because Amazon will only sample 10% of the file (and I think my high spec covers use up a lot of that) so readers only get a page or two. #4 is not for me to say, but I'm averaging 4 star reviews on all sites. #5 I still have a lot to learn here, and there is so much stuff I haven't even tried yet, but social networking is key and I think I'm doing okay there, and reviews are very, very important (both Amazon and book blogs), and I am starting to collect those.

For any title that is under-performing, I suggest looking at those five aspects and seeing what you can work on.

Out of all of them, the cover is the most important in getting someone to click on your listing in the first place. Then the blurb has to make them want to sample or buy. Promo is obviously crucial - if people don't know about it, they can't buy it.

A great book is obviously important, but if you don't have a great cover, great blurb, and tell people it's there, they will never find out.
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#12 dgaughran

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 12:02 PM

Dave,

Love that you share your numbers. I'm so impressed with the self-published authors I've met since I started on the same road. Lots of people sharing and helping each other out.

Never thought of bundling later. Great idea.

I've posted my numbers in the Welcome section of this site. I'm really enjoying learning how to self-market.

Love your traffic on your blog. My blog gets 10-20 people a day and I suspect I'm related to half of them :)

Nice work!

Ruth


The self-publishing community is amazing. Everyone from the bestsellers down to the newbies is willing to take the time to help everyone else. It's great, and I don't know any other profession like it (and a lot of that goes for writing as a whole and forums like this one).

In terms of blogging, Sommer Leigh has a superb series called the College of Blogging, with simple, practical tips on how to boost your traffic. I learned a huge amount from it. http://sommerleigh.com/archives/2194

In terms of sales numbers, I don't know of one success story (of a writer without a history in trade publishing) where the writer hit big numbers right out of the gate. Victorine Lieske only sold a handful of copies at the start - now she has sold over 100,000. John Locke only made $47 in his first six months. J Carson Black sold around 6 copies in her first 6 months. 6 months later she sold over 70,000 books in May alone.
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#13 Deb Borys

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 10:30 AM

The basic rules for e-book success are:

#1 Great Cover
#2 Great Blurb
#3 Great Opening
#4 Great Book
#5 Great Promo



It's number 5 I have the biggest problem with. :unsure:
Deb Borys
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#14 dgaughran

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:40 PM

It's number 5 I have the biggest problem with. :unsure:


Tell me about it. If I knew the answer to that riddle I would be in my yacht sailing to Honduras right now.

Don't know if it's going to work, but I'll tell you what I'm doing. I'm breaking it down piece by piece. I started with blogging. That got in decent shape pretty quickly, so I moved on Twitter. That was a bit of a learning curve, but I'm starting to get a nice number of followers after just a few weeks. Reviews were next. Once I had plenty of requests sent out, I moved on to my Facebook page. That's only getting going, and I really need to pretty it up. After that, I need to get into Goodreads. They are all time-sinks at the start, but as you go along, you start to realise what's a good use of your time and what isn't.

You need to get other people having conversations about your or your books. Starting them all yourself will never be enough (and can grate). If other people are doing your promo, then you have succeeded. Getting to that point is key, but it's not easy.
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#15 jwmstudio

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 05:15 PM

Tell me about it. If I knew the answer to that riddle I would be in my yacht sailing to Honduras right now.

Don't know if it's going to work, but I'll tell you what I'm doing. I'm breaking it down piece by piece. I started with blogging. That got in decent shape pretty quickly, so I moved on Twitter. That was a bit of a learning curve, but I'm starting to get a nice number of followers after just a few weeks. Reviews were next. Once I had plenty of requests sent out, I moved on to my Facebook page. That's only getting going, and I really need to pretty it up. After that, I need to get into Goodreads. They are all time-sinks at the start, but as you go along, you start to realise what's a good use of your time and what isn't.

You need to get other people having conversations about your or your books. Starting them all yourself will never be enough (and can grate). If other people are doing your promo, then you have succeeded. Getting to that point is key, but it's not easy.

Thanks for being so generous in sharing your strategy and stats. It is helpful.
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#16 Deb Borys

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  • Publishing Experience:My STREET STORIES suspense novel series is published by New Libri Press. I am also a freelance writer and editor, and spent four years volunteering with Emmaus Ministries and the Night Ministry in Chicago, and eight years doing similar work at Teen Feed, New Horizons and Street Links in Seattle. The STREET STORIES series reflects the reality of throw away youth striving to survive. I have also had several short stories published in print magazines and do freelance writing and editing. Some stories have been reprinted as self e-published stories on Amazon Kindle and Barnes and Noble Nook.

Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:41 PM

I've been doing the blogging and twittering also and am waiting for my publisher to give me a pub date for the novel before fleshing out my Face book page. How did you decide who to ask for reviews if you dont mind telling?
Deb Borys
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.debra-r-borys.com
www.paintedblacknovel.com
Debra Borys Kindle Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Author of Painted Black to be released Fall 2011 via New Libri Press.

#17 Lora Palmer

Lora Palmer

    Defying Gravity

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  • Publishing Experience:I have a short paranormal story, "Unfinished," published on Samantha Mabry's site, Flash Paranormal Fiction.

Posted 09 June 2011 - 02:58 PM

I haven't at all tried self-publishing, but at some point I might eventually try that for short story collections on Kindle Singles. The other day on the Kindle discussion forums at Amazon, there was a thread on how it's crucial to have discussions about your work. So, the thread proposed the idea of a discussion swap. That could be a useful idea for anyone looking to help others who need discussions on their work, and in return having someone begin a discussion on your work.
A Writer in Bloom blog: lorarpfictionblog.blogspot.com

#18 dgaughran

dgaughran

    Let's Get Digital

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 09:08 AM

Hi all,

People seemed to find my sales breakdown last month of interest. So here are the numbers for June. As if to shield me from any accusations of trumpet-blowing, sales almost halved this month.

Dave

Full Breakdown for June

If You Go Into The Woods

Amazon US 33 (down from 88)

Amazon UK 3 (down from 15)

Amazon DE 0 (down from 1)

Smashwords 5 (up from 4)

Sub-total 41 (down from 108)

Transfection

Amazon US 23 (down from 40)

Amazon UK 4 (up from 2)

Amazon DE 0 (no change)

Smashwords 10 (up from 3)

Sub-total 37 (down from 45)

June Total 78 (down from 153)

CUMULATIVE TOTALS:

If You Go Into The Woods (on sale since May 4th) – 149

Transfection (on sale since May 21st) – 82

GRAND TOTAL – 231 e-books sold since May 4th.

Analysis

Sales almost halved this month. There are a number of factors I can pinpoint, but some things are a mystery.

Tags disappeared for a couple of weeks. And at the same time, Amazon ran a sale called Sunshine Deals. 600 popular books from large publishers were slashed to prices as low as 99c.

This made it very difficult for a lot of indies, especially those like me who were selling short stories for that price. The sale ran for the first two weeks of the month, and it killed me.

Sales were around 4 a day going in to the month, but by the second week of June they had dropped to one every other day. All of John Locke’s books were knocked out of the Top 100. Amanda Hocking had a big drop in rankings. Joe Konrath was down 15% for the month. If those guys were going to be affected, I had no chance.

As soon as the sale ended, my sales climbed back up to the old level. However, they just flatlined again for the last few days of the month. I have no explanation for that.

Additionally, I did very little promo this month as I raced to finish a new book. Writing comes first, so that doesn’t bother me. I had some promo benefits – stuff I had set up in May, such as reviews – and that kept my numbers out of the fire.

Perhaps a far bigger factor than reduced promo was the lack of a new release. I had two books out in May, and two corresponding sales spikes (and in fact the second release raised the sale of the first release hugely).

Now I have (almost) two months of data. It’s too early to make judgments on anything, but I can at least highlight some things I need to watch. Transfection is not selling as well as If You Go Into The Woods. That has surprised me. I thought it would be the other way around, for a number of reasons.

Having said that, my first title got all the promo love before I had to knuckle down and finish my book. It has received way more reviews (book blogs and Amazon), and was the focus of a more sustained push. The second one didn’t get the same help at all, but I can address that this month.

Something else I need to watch: my UK sales. While the numbers are in line with the US, I have sold maybe one book there in three weeks. Not sure why.

That’s all the negatives out of the way. And I’m not too disappointed with this numbers. I have sold 231 e-books in my first 2 months. I think that’s pretty impressive. I have covered 75% of the costs of my first release, and paid off a chunk of the second.

Plus, I am now in the Smashwords Premium Catalogue, and the books trickled through to Barnes & Noble, and iTunes in the last few days. I know I have some sales there, but they are not included above – I won’t get those numbers for a while.

Also, I didn’t spend a dime in June, my Smashwords sales have doubled, and the blog is exploding in popularity.

I had over 11,000 views in June, with 4,000 of those coming in the last 7 days. Blog subscribers have tripled. On days where I don’t post, I am hitting 400 views. When I do, it can be as high as 700. For a blog that is less than three months old, those are astounding numbers.

I’m starting to get a handle on Twitter. In June, my followers jumped from 180 or so to 1,800. This has been one of the biggest drivers of traffic to my blog. I have seen a few posts in the last couple of weeks go “viral” to some extent, and I am picking up 50 to 100 followers a day at the moment.

All of this is building nicely towards the release of Let’s Get Digital. That’s with the editor now, and my cover designer is beavering away; I’m looking towards a mid-July release. I have high hopes for it.

I think the combination of a guide to the nuts-and-bolts of digital self-publishing, with an overview of the publishing industry, plus all those success stories could be popular. When you add that to the PDF version being available for free, it has a chance of taking off.

It will be interesting to see if a new release in a completely different genre (and non-fiction rather than fiction) will lift the sales of my existing titles. I think it will, but even if it doesn’t, I have some promo stuff planned for those too (especially Transfection). I will also be working on new stories, and preparing a novel for an end of summer release.
Posted Image   Posted Image http://ecx.images-am...+yL._SL125_.jpg   http://ecx.images-am...91L._SL125_.jpg <---NEW RELEASE!!!
Download the FREE PDF version at my blog: Let's Get Digital
I have a new blog where I share curious incidents from the history of the world's most exotic continent: South Americana

#19 dgaughran

dgaughran

    Let's Get Digital

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 01:04 PM

Just passed the 250 mark for anyone keeping score :)
Posted Image   Posted Image http://ecx.images-am...+yL._SL125_.jpg   http://ecx.images-am...91L._SL125_.jpg <---NEW RELEASE!!!
Download the FREE PDF version at my blog: Let's Get Digital
I have a new blog where I share curious incidents from the history of the world's most exotic continent: South Americana

#20 mwsinclair

mwsinclair

    Elephant with a trunk full of novels

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  • Publishing Experience:Journalist covering U.S. nonprofits, foundations, and life in general. President and Chief Elephant Officer of Elephant's Bookshelf Press, LLC, and publisher of Spring Fevers, an anthology of short stories, 2012, which includes sixteen stories by ten AQC writers, and The Fall, a collection of tales from the apocalypse. Ironically, The Fall was delayed by the apocalyptic Hurricane Sandy. Published Summer's Edge and Summer's Double Edge in July 2013 and Winter's Regret in January 2014. Our first novel, Whispering Minds by A.T. O'Connor, was published in November 2013, and our second, Battery Brothers, in time for baseball's opening day, 2014. We're getting Billy Bobble Makes a Magic Wand by RS Mellette ready for publication on Dec. 1, 2014.

Posted 12 July 2011 - 08:57 AM

For what it's worth, Dave, if I'm coming at them just based on the covers and titles, I'd have little interest in "Transfection" because the word is essentially meaningless to me, while If You Go Into the Woods is chock-full of possibilities and really bodes well for a collection of stories.




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